2016-2017 Graduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Aug 22, 2019  
2016-2017 Graduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
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    AC 700 - Ethics for Accounting Professionals

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. students. This course has two primary objectives: to provide a practical, action-oriented approach to business ethics that helps individuals who work in corporations and organizations decide what to do when they are faced with an ethical dilemma, and to explore modern corporate social responsibility-an approach to management that guides organizations beyond creating an ethical environment in the workplace. While pursuing these objectives, students study alternative perspectives on a wide range of contemporary business issues through readings and case studies. Ultimately, students see the extent to which ethics and moral and social responsibilities are intertwined. Verbal and written communication skills and the professional judgment expected of leaders are emphasized.
  
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    AC 701 - Advanced International Accounting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. students. Examines the international dimensions of accounting. Topics include International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), corporate financial reporting and convergence, and international financial statement analysis.
  
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    AC 702 - Advanced Financial Accounting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. and graduate accounting certificate students. Building on their study of intermediate accounting, students gain an understanding of financial accounting concepts, use data to engage in problem-solving, and learn technical details regarding pensions and additional financial instruments. Topics include stockholders' equity, dilutive securities and earnings per share, accounting for income taxes, accounting for pensions, postretirement benefits, accounting changes and error analysis, statement of cash flows, and full disclosure in financial reporting. Closed to students who have taken the course as a topic under GB 763.

    (Summer only)

  
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    AC 703 - Performance Measurement and Strategic Cost Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. students. Addresses how accounting is used to support decision making, planning, control, and performance measurement within organizations.
  
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    AC 704 - Tax Research

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. students. Provides in-depth electronic accounting, auditing, and tax research. Emphasizes the use of databases, practice in issue identification, reading and analyzing primary authority, and communicating results.
  
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    AC 705 - Advanced Accounting Information Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. and graduate accounting certificate students. Provides a detailed study of integrated components within an accounting information system. A thorough examination of current issues that pertain to information technology is conducted. Students utilize the database approach to design and develop a complex system of storing and retrieving data. Closed to students who have taken GB 768.

    (Summer only)

  
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    AC 707 - Government and Nonprofit Accounting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. students. Focuses on the accounting and financial reporting issues of governmental units, not-for-profit organizations, colleges and universities, and some health care entities. Covers fund accounting and financial reporting for state and local units under GASB Statement No. 34, as well as not-for-profit accounting principles.
  
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    AC 708 - Advanced Finance

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. students. Students learn to apply financial accounting metrics to the valuation of firms in the capital markets. They also gain an understanding of the interrelationships among financial statements, stock options, and derivatives.
  
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    AC 709 - Accounting Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. students. Students work full-time for an accounting firm, company, government agency, or not-for-profit organization.
  
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    AC 710 - Professional Communications

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. and graduate accounting certificate students. The course teaches professional people how to communicate more effectively using various media. It begins with the basics-grammar, spelling, punctuation-and progresses through audience identification, message creation, communication media, nonverbal communication, and visual presentations. Students use a workbook to practice the basics and a textbook to learn the fundamentals of communication via various media. The goal is for students to gain the ability to construct an effective document using any available medium and to understand the dynamics of interpersonal communication. Closed to students who have taken GB 767. (Summer only)
  
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    AC 711 - Seminar in Accounting Practice

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.Acc. students. An overall analysis and review of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountant's (AICPA) Content Specification outlines. Study includes financial accounting and reporting,regulation, auditing and attestation, and business environment and concepts. (Fall/Spring)

Computer Science

  
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    CS 610 - Discrete Mathematics and Algorithm Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of mathematical topics common to many areas of computer science. Topics include logic and proof techniques, sequences and summations, set theory and combinatorics, probability, recurrence relations and asymptotic growth of functions, graph theory, finite-state machines, and Turing machines.
  
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    CS 630 - Computing Fundamentals I

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the basic concepts of computer organization and programming. Algorithms are created and implemented in a high-level, object-oriented language to perform mathematical computations and data processing. Includes basic control flow constructs, elementary data structures (strings and arrays), and object-oriented design.
  
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    CS 631 - Computing Fundamentals II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 630 . Intermediate programming emphasizing object-oriented methodologies for development, debugging, and testing of programs. Topics include inheritance, file processing, basic algorithm analysis, recursion, and data structures such as lists, stacks, queues, binary trees, and hash tables.
  
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    CS 701 - Principles of Programming Languages

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 722 . Concepts and structures governing the design and implementation of modern programming languages. Run-time representations of traditional block structured languages, typing systems, abstraction and procedure mechanisms, and storage management. Special emphasis on object-oriented and functional languages, their type systems, and operational and denotational semantics.
  
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    CS 702 - Operating Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 722 . Considers processes, process synchronization and mutual exclusion, and techniques for memory allocation, scheduling, and disk management. Surveys current computer operating systems and discusses research in distributed operating systems.
  
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    CS 703 - Programming for Data Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    Blends methods of organizing data with algorithms for extracting and manipulating very large data sets. This course enables students to prepare data and generate features for unstructured text. Data structures such as hashing, trees, queues, lists, priority queues, and graphs are studied. Algorithms such as sorting, searching, and basic graph algorithms are included. The map-reduce framework is also introduced.
  
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    CS 710 - Fundamentals of Web Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 722  or written permission of the program director. This course concentrates on webpage layout techniques and graphics concepts. These concepts are implemented using advanced HTML and Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) techniques, as well as basic JavaScript. Industry standard commercial tools, Adobe Dreamweaver, and Adobe Photoshop are taught and utilized in class projects. Prior knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript is helpful but not required.
  
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    CS 712 - Web Application Development with Servlets and JavaServer Pages

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 722 . This project-oriented course delves into techniques for developing server-side programs for websites, e-commerce, web-enabled enterprise computing, and other applications that require web-based access to server-based resources. Attention is paid to methods for making server-side applications efficient, maintainable, and flexible. Topics include handling HTTP request information, generating HTTP response data, processing cookies, tracking sessions, server-side security, basics of model-view-controller architecture, designing custom JSP tag libraries, and some common "real world" design patterns used in web development.
  
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    CS 713 - Java Design Patterns and Best Practices

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 712 . Provides real-world Java best practices along with concepts underlying these best practices. Examines core design patterns used in everyday Java development including discussion of why and when design patterns are useful as well as how specific design patterns support best practices. Assigned projects exercise the application of sound software design and best practices.
  
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    CS 714 - XML Technologies and Applications

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 712 . A project-oriented course introducing students to XML and XML-related technologies. The course covers XML itself, DTD, XML Scheme, Namespaces, XSLT, XPath, SAX, DOM, JAXP, JAXB, Apache Digester, etc. It briefly introduces the basics of CSS and XHTML. Students are introduced to web services (WSDL, SOAP, JAX-WS, etc.) within the JEE, as well as standalone client environments. Projects reinforce the concepts discussed in class, requiring students to use these technologies to solve similar-to-real-world problems, including developing and deploying JEE-compliant web services.
  
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    CS 715 - Developing Rich Internet Applications with AJAX

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 712 . A project-oriented course introducing the student to development and deployment of AJAX-based web applications. Advanced JavaScript is introduced as it relates to AJAX and manipulating the browser's Document Object Model (DOM). AJAXbased frameworks are introduced to ease JavaScript and AJAX development. Among these are Prototype, Scriptaculous, JQuery, Google Widget Toolkit, etc.
  
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    CS 716 - Modern MVC Web Frameworks

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 712 . This project-oriented course introduces the student to modern model-view-controller (MVC) web frameworks like JavaServer Faces, Struts, and Spring Framework MVC. The course concentrates on the framework's how-to's, its pros and cons, its life cycle management, time-saving development techniques, and deployment strategies.
  
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    CS 718 - Graphics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 722 . A comprehensive analysis of the techniques and algorithms used to develop graphical images using computer generated data. Covers the mathematical concepts required to produce two and three-dimensional text and graphics on raster and vector displays. Examines and evaluates hardware and software design considerations relative to current display technology. Explores techniques for three-dimensional photorealistic graphics, as well as advanced methods in object modeling and animation. Emphasis on the algorithms and mathematical principles that underpin programming techniques. Includes ray tracing, hidden surface elimination, radiosity, physics-based modeling for animation, and other topics as possible.
  
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    CS 730 - Introduction to Networking

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 722  or written permission of instructor. An overview of the concepts of computer networking, including the TCP/IP suite, network interfaces, and design and performance issues. The course provides familiarity with network tools and network programming and considers some contemporary issues, both technical and social, concerning network technologies.
  
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    CS 731 - Advanced Networking

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 730 . An in-depth look at contemporary networking challenges, including peer-to-peer, multimedia, and mobile/wireless devices. Offers hands-on experience at all network levels from low-level router behavior to the analysis of global-scale network traffic. Students also have the opportunity to read and present on modern research topics.
  
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    CS 750 - Special Topics in Computer Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Varies with topic. An on-demand course for a current topic. May be repeated twice for credit.
  
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    CS 751 - Independent Study

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students must submit a written proposal to a member of the faculty of the computer science program prior to the last day of class registration. Proposed topics, which are normally discussed in advance with the professor, should permit study and/or laboratory work in considerable depth beyond the scope of a course offered in the curriculum.
  
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    CS 760 - Advanced Operating Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 702 . An in-depth inspection of the UNIX operating system internals via the C programming language. Topics include system calls and their internals, process implementation, communication, and management; file system implementation and management; device management; and networking, with a detailed analysis of virtualization, embedded systems, and cloud computing.
  
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    CS 762 - Database Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 610  and CS 631 , or equivalent; CS 722  (may be taken concurrently). Discusses major database organizations with emphasis on the relational approach. Topics include physical storage; design tools including entity-relationship modeling and normalization techniques; query processing including formal languages, SQL, QBE, and optimization; transaction modeling; concurrency issues; and current trends in database management systems. Includes laboratory experiences with the design and use of database management systems.
  
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    CS 764 - Network Security

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 730 . Focuses on practical applications such as firewalls, intrusion detection, virus prevention, and security settings for Windows and Linux. Also covers the basics of cryptography as well as security protocols such as SSL, IPsec, and Kerberos.
  
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    CS 770 - Software Engineering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 722 , CS 724 . Covers software engineering practices and approaches. Topics include development life cycle models, requirements specification, use cases, design methods, testing, software evolution, quality assurance, and configuration management. Unified Modeling Language (UML) is introduced. Traditional versus agile methods are contrasted. Management concerns and standards, including Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI), are discussed. Additional topics may include metrics, reuse, development environments, introduction to formal methods, and software engineering research.
  
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    CS 771 - Engineering Systems Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 770 . Engineering systems, design processes, decision making, models, alternatives and evaluation, optimization, feasibility and reliability, and management and organization.
  
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    CS 772 - Object-Oriented Analysis and Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 722 . Presents the concepts and techniques necessary to effectively use system requirements captured through use cases to drive the development of a software design model. Students use Unified Modeling Language (UML) to represent object-oriented analysis and design views for architecture, classes, objects, components, and other items of interest. Relationships, stereotypes, and other UML considerations are covered.
  
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    CS 773 - Software System Specification

    (3.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: CS 770 . Formal specification of architecture and architecture frameworks, requirements, systems modeling languages, algebraic specification languages, denotational semantics, and correctness. Emphasis is on the rigor required to design and build critical systems.
  
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    CS 774 - Human-Computer Interaction

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 630 . Corequisite: CS 631 . The design and measurement of the interface between users and software. Mixes examination and construction of real-world user interfaces with relevant theories of cognition, mental models, and human performance. Students build and critique user interfaces. Strategies for obtaining a high-performance, high-quality user experience are considered. Additional topics may include interaction with portable devices, audio and haptic interaction, online communities, visualization, new devices, and advanced HCI research areas.
  
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    CS 780 - Software Reliability and Testing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 770 . Explores approaches to testing and analysis aimed at improving software quality, safety, and reliability across the software development lifecycle. Topics include concepts, models, and design techniques related to software reliability. Testing topics include formal and informal methods; dynamic, static, and data-flow program analysis; selection of test cases; program instrumentation; mutation analysis; and symbolic execution.

    Last semester offered, Spring 2015.

  
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    CS 790 - Software Architecture and Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 770 . Topics include the organization of a software system; the selection of the structural elements and their interfaces and behavior as specified in the collaboration among those elements; the composition of the elements into progressively larger subsystems; and the architectural style that guides the organization, its elements and their interfaces, collaborations, and composition.
  
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    CS 791 - Cost Estimation and Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 770 . Covers both traditional and state-of-the-art methods, identifying advantages and disadvantages of each, and the underlying aspects of preparing cost estimates of significant software systems. Topics include estimation, risk analysis, scheduling, software quality assurance, software configuration management planning, and execution.
  
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    CS 792 - Software Maintenance and Evolution

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 770 . Software maintenance, also known as software evolution, is the implementation of consistent changes to an existing system. This difficult task is compounded both by the pressing business constraints which lead to the required change and the inherent difficulty of safely modifying complex systems. Both the process under which software is changed (e.g., configuration control) and the modern techniques for reducing the engineer's effort when making changes (e.g., comprehension strategies, consistent change principles, ripple analysis, and regression test effort) are examined.

Data Science

  
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    CS 737 - Machine Learning

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 703 . Introduces core machine learning models and algorithms for classification, regression, clustering, and dimensionality reduction. The course focuses on both understanding the theory of learning approaches, and effectively using them to solve real-world data science problems. Topics include least squares methods, linear classification, support vector machines, Bayesian networks and inference, the EM algorithm, and kernel methods.
  
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    CS 745 - Multimedia Data Analysis and Mining

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 737 , ST 710 . Explores the analysis of images, video, and audio for identification and extraction of meaningful information from large databases. Students apply techniques from areas such as image processing, pattern recognition, machine learning, and computer vision to the large datasets produced in applications including medical imaging, robotic vision, remote satellite sensing, and surveillance. Students learn to transform, compress, segment, track, and classify structured multimedia data.
  
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    CS 746 - Data Visualization

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 703 , ST 710 . Examines techniques for both exploratory graphical analysis and effective visual presentation of complex data. This course covers both analytic techniques for data preparation as well as cognitive and perceptual issues in designing informative and effective visualizations. Students learn to model, reduce, and interpret large sets of discrete and continuous data for display and interactive visualization. Through case studies and projects, students review how to use and choose standard methods in charting and plotting data, and create these with statistical design software tools and languages.
  
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    CS 752 - Parallel Computing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 703 . Presents the fundamentals of parallel computing from both hardware and software perspectives with an emphasis on writing and analyzing parallel data analysis and visualization algorithms. This course examines various parallel processor and memory architectures (including, but not limited to SMP and multi-core), and introduces appropriate parallel programming models, focusing on threading models. Metrics and tools for algorithm and architecture analysis are also discussed.
  
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    CS 753 - Big Data

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 703 . Covers a range of topics from big data storage and processing to large-scale machine learning libraries. As a hands-on programming course, students learn the details of the design and administration of a cluster, as well as how to apply these details to process "big data". By the end of the course, students should understand the challenges associated with big data, and the tools available to support answering big data questions.
  
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    CS 761 - Modeling and Simulation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 737 . Discusses the general theory of modeling and simulation, as applied to computational science, studying a variety of systems, including physical processes, computer systems, and biological systems. Simulation approaches include agent-based modeling, discrete-event modeling, and complex network analysis. This course also includes the entire modeling and simulation life cycle, such as analysis of the initial problem, abstraction to a model, simulation and validation of the model, and analysis of results.
  
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    CS 765 - Database Retrieval

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 703 . Focuses on how to retrieve data from relational and NoSQL databases. Topics include physical organization; query processing including formal languages, SQL, and optimization; transaction modeling; and concurrency issues. Students are exposed to graph-based databases, key-value stores, and other NoSQL databases. Includes laboratory experiences with the use of database management systems.
  
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    CS 766 - Information Retrieval and Natural Language Processing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 737 . Blends textual information retrieval with natural language processing to focus on topics data scientists use to collect web data and make use of unstructured text in data models. Examples of topics are basic and advanced techniques for text-based information systems involving indexing and text representation; text classification and Naïve Bayes; web search, crawling and indexing; statistical inference, Markov models; and clustering.
  
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    DS 795 - Data Science Project Design

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 703 , GB 851 , ST 710 . Corequisite: CS 737 , ST 765 . Students must pursue an independent or small group research project that utilizes data science methods acquired during the program to address a real problem. This one-credit design course requires that students identify a suitable project, including the data to be used, and the questions asked of the data. Depending upon a project's complexity, students work either individually or in small, approved teams. The problem statement and the data stem from real-world situations similar to those that students might encounter within industry, government, non-profit, or academic research. The problem is usually specified by an industry, governmental, or non-profit sponsor with the data sets provided by that sponsor. Academic and governmental research groups may also propose projects. Each project team is supervised by the course director (in some cases, with a relevant faculty advisor) and advised by the project coach assigned from the academic, governmental, or industry sponsor, generally representing the organization that supplied the data. A component of the design is the consideration of any ethical issues raised by the project. As such, the need for ethical actions with respect to data science is also studied. The project design is reviewed by the course director and either the program board or, in the case of confidential data, by the course director after a confidentiality agreement is signed, and a group internal to the organization.
  
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    DS 796 - Data Science Project

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: DS 795 . Students complete the independent or small group research project proposed in DS 795 , then present their work as a paper and at an end-of-semester symposium. Within the project, students use the complete process of addressing a real data science project which includes collecting and processing the data, applying an appropriate method to the problem, reporting on the problem, and its solution. The final report includes a discussion of the ethics involved in the project. Each project team is supervised by the course director (in some cases, with a relevant faculty advisor) and advised by the project coach assigned from the academic, governmental, or industry sponsor. To be taken the semester following DS 795 .
  
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    GB 852 - Advanced Analytics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GB 851 .  

    This advanced course provides a more in-depth coverage of the technical aspects of each of the modeling tools discussed in previous courses. Furthermore, this course expands students' knowledge set to techniques such as optimization, risk management, and new types of data visualizations that streamline the visual presentation of large, complex datasets in order to support better business decision making. These techniques are demonstrated using many of today's leading analysis tools including NoSQL, Hadoop, Hive, Shark, R, Apache, and Google BigQuery. These technologies form the core of an open-source software framework that supports the processing of large datasets, visualizing data, building dashboards, and choosing tools for statistical analyses. Application of these techniques to National Security concerns is also examined. Students apply analytics to their organization's datasets or to a dataset provided by the instructor.

  
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    GB 853 - Social Media and Web Mining

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GB 851 . Teaches students to uncover underlying themes or concepts contained in large document collections, automatically group documents into topical clusters, classify documents into predefined categories, and integrate text data with structured data to enrich predictive modeling endeavors. Students participate in managerial decision making, using social media and web mining through analyses of these data types. Students also process and prepare textual data for analysis, group documents using similarity measures, identify topics and extract from a document collection, apply association discovery techniques, and address problems from the areas of forensic linguistics, document categorization, and information retrieval. The course provides an introduction to Python which covers the functionality of software SAS Text Miner™—a component for SAS Enterprise Miner™ used in previous courses. Strategic uses of text and social media data are addressed using case studies.

Educational Leadership

  
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    AD 650 - Curriculum, Assessment, and Instructional Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    Supports students' capacity to provide instructional leadership at the school and district level, focusing on the improvement and integration of curriculum, assessment, and instruction. Students apply the "Understanding by Design" model of curriculum design, using a three-stage backward design approach that ensures the coherence and rigor of the curriculum and transforms student learning. The course incorporates research-based design standards and collaborative peer review processes that create high-quality professional development strategies that address the learning needs of teachers.
  
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    AD 662 - Leadership, Supervision, and Professional Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the essential roles that the educational leader plays in the professional growth of the instructional staff in support of improved student learning. The foundation of this course is based upon standards for effective professional development and adult learning, as well as theory and application of contemporary supervisory models. In addition, this course emphasizes the essential role of the school leader in the development and implementation of a professional learning community within the school.
  
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    AD 668 - School Law

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the legal responsibilities of school leaders within the context of the contemporary educational environment. Students explore the historical foundation of constitutional law as it pertains to school law, with particular emphasis on students' and teachers' rights and responsibilities to freedom of speech, privacy, due process, and equal protection of the law. Through the court case analysis approach, students examine, analyze, and assess the impact legislative, executive, and judicial branches of federal and state governments have had on education, both from the historical and contemporary context.
  
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    AD 674 - Human Relations and the Culturally Proficient School Leader

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines human relations in schools from philosophical, psychological, and sociological context through the lens of the culturally proficient school leader. This course includes an examination of pedagogical and social practices for multicultural environments as supported by communication, uncovering and resolving conflicts, parent involvement, and group dynamics. This course also explores issues such as racism, sexism, and classism related to the educational environment.
  
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    AD 680 - Leadership Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores current issues and practices in the field of education through a series of forums designed to help students prepare for their role as a school leader. Through the use of class discussion and reflection, and critical thinking and inquiry, students develop a deeper knowledge and understanding of educational leadership within the current context of education.
  
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    AD 681 - Organizational Development in Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of contemporary models for designing, developing, and managing the complexities of education as a social organization. Particular attention is placed on structure, culture and climate, human and group dynamics, organizational symbols and politics, change, and the critical role of leadership as related to contemporary educational organizations.
  
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    AD 682 - Technology for School Leaders

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the potential of technology and planning for successful implementation in K-12 schools, in classroom and online settings. Students apply technology to leadership in terms of vision, effective teaching, improving student achievement, and professional development, in addition to data-driven decision making, management, operations, and social, legal, and ethical issues. Students join a global learning community and work both individually and in teams to develop innovative action plans, create and share web-based instructional leadership tasks, publish a school leader's blog, and post wikis. This course is aligned with TSSA, ISTE, Maryland Technology Standards for School Administrators, and evidenced-based leadership practices for technology as it evolves within the twenty-first century school context.
  
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    AD 683 - Leadership Theories and Practices in Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines leadership theory, concepts, and philosophy for effective school leadership with special emphasis placed on student acquisition of knowledge, understanding, and application of the Professional Standards for School Leaders and the Maryland Instructional Leadership Framework. Concepts such as visionary leadership, instructional leadership, equity and ethics in leadership, collaborative leadership, change leadership, and the development of the individual as a school leader are also explored. In addition, students are introduced to dispositions needed for effective school leadership.
  
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    AD 684 - Resource Management

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: M.Ed. students must have 33 credits completed. Certification students must have 15 credits completed. Restricted to Educational Leadership students who began the program prior to Fall 2014.

    Provides students the opportunity to apply and develop their conceptual knowledge and understanding of educational leadership under the guidance of both a school leader and a university supervisor. Students also develop, implement and present a portfolio based upon their comprehensive experiences found in their internship. This course constitutes a single internship that will start in the fall and continue through the spring. One final grade is assigned at the completion of the course.

  
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    AD 686 - The Instructional Leader and Assessing Student Learning

    (3.00 cr.)

    Emphasizes the critical role of instructional leadership in the role of the assessment process and its contribution to school improvement and increasing student achievement. Participants analyze, synthesize, and evaluate various theories and applications of assessing student learning in the contemporary educational realm. Special attention is given to the Maryland Instructional Leadership Framework throughout the course, with emphasis on aligning all aspects of school culture to student and adult learning. Using educational statistics is also a critical part of this course as it relates to improving teaching and student learning.
  
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    AD 687 - Internship in Educational Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: M.Ed. students must have 33 credits completed. Certification students must have 15 credits completed. Provides students the opportunity to apply and develop their conceptual knowledge and understanding of educational leadership under the guidance of both a school leader and a University supervisor. Students develop, implement and present a portfolio based upon their comprehensive experiences found in their internship. AD 687 constitutes a single internship that will start in the fall and continue through the spring. One final grade is assigned at the completion of the course. Open to students who entered the program prior to fall 2014.
  
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    AD 688 - Internship in Educational Leadership I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: M.Ed. students must have 33 credits completed. Certification students must have 15 credits completed. Students have the opportunity to apply and develop their conceptual knowledge and understanding of educational leadership under the guidance of both a school leader and a University supervisor. In addition, students develop, implement, and present a portfolio based upon the comprehensive experiences found in their internship. (Fall only)
  
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    AD 689 - Internship in Educational Leadership II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AD 688 ; M.Ed. students must have 33 credits completed. Certification students must have 15 credits completed. Students have the opportunity to complete their internship experiences and portfolios. In addition, they reflect upon the total context of school leadership, including how to provide effective and efficient school leadership from an organizational context in terms of structure, human relations, politics, and culture. (Spring only)
  
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    AD 776 - Theory and Research on Educational Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines recent research in the field of Educational Leadership. Students explore prevailing paradigms and modes of research, as well as topics of contemporary and historical context relative to research in support of teaching, student learning, and school leadership.
  
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    AD 932 - Special Education Law and Compliance for School Leaders

    (3.00 cr.)

    Intended for administrators and other school leaders, this course reviews federal and state regulations and case law regarding special education, as well as other laws that relate to individuals with disabilities (e.g., Section 504, NCLB, FERPA). Using case study and other applied methods, students examine and resolve common legal problems in special education compliance and service delivery. Examples of compliance problem areas include eligibility determinations, 504 plans, IEP development, FAPE, LRE, discipline, staffing, scheduling, progress monitoring, and access to the general curriculum for students with disabilities.

Education

  
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    ED 600 - Foundations of Research in Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines various approaches to research in education, including historical/experimental methods, the survey, case study, and philosophical inquiry. Focuses on quantitative and qualitative methodology. Encourages students to develop a basis for evaluating and understanding research in the field and to familiarize themselves with the literature in their chosen areas of concentration. Acquisition of state-of-the-art information searching and accessing strategies is an integral part of the course objectives.
  
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    ED 601 - Philosophical Foundations of Diversity and Social Justice in Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students focus on the intersection of diversity, social justice, and educational practices. Framed within current educational controversies, students are encouraged to develop an initial articulation of their personal philosophy of education. Readings help provoke critical reflection around these benefits and assumptions that will inform a further elaboration of student's philosophy of education.
  
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    ED 602 - Learner-Centered Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students examine the theoretical roots of learner-centered education. The focus is on the best available knowledge about how individuals learn and the most effective teaching techniques that emerge from those theories. Fundamental principles are stressed that can lead to the formation of motivated learners with a deep understanding of content and the ability to use their new knowledge to solve problems and think critically. Learning by Design, Universal Design for Learning, and Problem-Based Learning are presented as examples of the learner-centered approach.
  
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    ED 608 - Creative Thinking, Collaboration, and Educational Change

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students systematically examine innovation in schools, including the philosophical and psychological assumptions that underlie departures from traditional schooling. Focusing on individuals, students explore theories in creativity and creative problem-solving skills to consider ways to open up individuals, groups, and institutions to meaningful change. Students are also exposed to new paradigms and programs in education.
  
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    ED 612 - Philosophy, History of Education, and Curriculum Theories

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students focus on pivotal moments in American history and their influence upon the development of educational thought, curriculum, and instruction. Students gain a greater understanding of the contemporary condition of schools and educational policies and determine to what extent schools have been successful in fulfilling a democratic idea or complicit in maintaining the status quo.
  
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    ED 618 - Special Topics in Classroom Instruction

    (3-6.00 cr.)

    A survey of current research on topics in instruction strategies. Topics vary. May be repeated once with a different topic.
  
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    ED 623 - Independent Study in Education

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Individual projects geared to specific needs or interests of students. Specific requirements related to each independent study will be approved on an individual basis. Written or electronic permission of the advisor and the department chair.
  
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    ED 625 - Advanced Study in Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Montessori students. An independent study in the culminating experience for the Montessori M.Ed. program. Topics are approved on an individual basis. The student reviews and analyzes relevant research and submits a final paper. Written or electronic permission of the advisor.
  
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    ED 627 - Advanced Research Project in Montessori Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students design and implement a research project related to their field of specialization. A proposal is submitted for approval. Documentation of the project is submitted in a portfolio that includes a research paper.
  
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    ED 650 - Curriculum Theories and Practices

    (3.00 cr.)

    The course is intended to support educator's skills in developing curricula and assessments. Students focus on both the goal of curriculum design work, producing a coherent design with clear alignment among instructional and assessment components, and the process of curriculum development, using a set of design standards and a peer review process.
  
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    ED 659 - Race, Class, and Gender Studies in Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore structural theories of race, class, and gender in an effort to understand how these discourses impact unequal educational experiences and outcomes. Students unpack how schools operate as a mechanism for reproducing a racialized, gendered, and classed social order. Through this conversation students can begin the journey of working toward schools that challenge the status quo.
  
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    ED 670 - Teacher Research and Inquiry

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Curriculum and instruction students must have 24 credits completed. Investigates aspects of action research including choosing a topic to study, examining ethical issues, planning and implementing methodologies, conducting a literature review, becoming a reflective practitioner, and analyzing data.
  
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    ED 750 - Thesis Seminar I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.A. students. Students planning to propose a thesis topic enroll in this course as they begin the thesis process. Informal meetings scheduled at the convenience of the participants and advisors provide an opportunity for critical discussion of planned research. Students receive credit upon successful completion of the thesis. Written or electronic permission of the advisor.
  
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    ED 751 - Thesis Seminar II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 750   Restricted to M.A. students. The culmination of work begun in ED 750 . Students enroll in this course during the last semester of thesis work and receive credit upon successful completion of the thesis. Written or electronic permission of the advisor.
  
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    ED 776 - Theory and Research on Teaching

    (3.00 cr.)

    Designed to give students an understanding of the range of theories and research on teaching and teacher leadership. The course content focuses on original research studies and theoretical arguments, primarily on instructional practices, professional development, cultural contexts of schooling, and pedagogical/philosophical issues within education.
  
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    ED 800 - Thesis Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students analyze data from research projects begun in ED 670 . Students use and apply the lenses gained during the initial course sequence to examine the educational implications of their research. As a summative assessment, students complete an original empirical research thesis based on a conceptual or historical educational issue.

    Should be taken as the final course in the curriculum and instruction program.

  
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    ED 805 - Capstone Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students use and apply the lenses gained during the initial core course sequence to examine an educational problem, topic, or issue related to their chosen track. As a summative assessment, students complete an original empirical research study or other substantive project in close consultation with their faculty advisor.

    Should be taken as the final course in the curriculum and instruction program.

  
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    ED 900 - Advanced Study in Music Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students participate in an in-depth study of music learning theory that includes theory, aptitude testing, practical applications in the classroom, and assessment.

Educational Technology

  
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    ET 605 - Introduction to Educational Technology

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Examines applications of traditional and emerging technology to the curriculum with an emphasis on the use of technology as an instructional tool to enhance the quality of classroom instruction and facilitate the work of the teacher. Includes hands-on experience with a variety of technology as well as discussions of the place of technology in school reform. This laboratory-based course provides hands-on computer experience in class and requires extensive computer work outside of class. M.A.T. program students may opt to take this course for one credit. Completing this course for one credit does not fulfill any non-elective or prerequisite requirement outside of the M.A.T. program.
  
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    ET 610 - Curricular Applications of Technology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ET 605  or written permission of the instructor. Studies applications of technology to the curriculum in a variety of disciplines. Reviews software and technology projects to enhance science, mathematics, social studies, and language arts. Criteria for evaluating software and technology projects are discussed, and technological resources in each curricular area are presented.
  
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    ET 620 - Multimedia Design in the Classroom

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ET 605  or written permission of the instructor. An introduction to design, development, and evaluation of multimedia projects with an emphasis on multimedia production in the K-12 classroom. Students use multimedia authoring tools to produce courseware for classroom use and learn how to incorporate multimedia design projects into their curricula. Emphasis is on the use of multimedia design to teach K-12 students to be critical consumers of information. This laboratory-based course provides hands-on computer experience in class and requires extensive computer work outside of class.
  
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    ET 630 - Digital Communication for Educators

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ET 605  or written permission of the instructor. Examines ways that learners can use digital communication technology to work creatively with others; to expand the walls of their classrooms for collaborative and global learning; and to enhance the ways that students access, evaluate, and disseminate information.
  
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    ET 631 - Transformative Online Teaching

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ET 605  or written permission of the instructor. Students develop expertise for teaching online and blended courses in K-12 and higher education settings. The course focuses on theories and best practices for integrating emerging technologies to facilitate high quality online and blended courses. Students develop pedagogical strategies that promote strategic use of asynchronous and synchronous tools that heighten student engagement, social presence, and interaction.
  
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    ET 640 - Adaptive/Assistive Technology for Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ET 605  or written permission of the instructor. Examines adaptive/assistive technologies for helping special needs students in the classroom.
  
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    ET 641 - Universal Design for Learning with Technology Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Participants experience how to support the learning needs of students with diverse learning styles and needs, including those with special education or limited English proficiency needs in inclusive settings. Universal design for learning is the core for learning specific evidence-based strategies for curriculum content acquisition. Participants are involved in the development of unit plans that incorporate adaptations and accommodations through technology, assistive technology, content enhancements, and learning strategies.
  
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    ET 660 - Innovative Digital Schools

    (3.00 cr.)

    Technology has been both a catalyst for transformation of schools, as well as a way of entrenching traditional pedagogical styles. This course explores examples of schools that have tried to use technology in transformative ways, including schools based around gaming, online schools, flipped classrooms, and one-to-one schools. Participants come away with ideas, based in real examples, of how technology can help schools to break out of the traditional paradigm.
  
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    ET 680 - The Role of the Technology Leader

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ET 605  or written permission of the instructor. Explores the role of the technology leader in fostering school change with technology. Examines models of change and the various ways that teacher leaders, school leaders, and school system leaders can become catalysts for change through innovative technology integration. Focuses on the role of technology planning for successful implementation of school change.
  
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    ET 690 - Educational Technology Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AD 776  or ED 600  or ED 670 , ET 605 . Examines current trends in the field of educational technology. May be repeated for credit with written permission of advisor.
  
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    ET 691 - Educational Technology Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: 24 credits completed. Students engage in a major educational technology leadership project in a school or school-district setting. At meetings with the advisor, assigned readings in specific areas of educational technology are discussed to provide some theory for the educational technology practice in which individual participants engage. At the conclusion of the internship, students complete a portfolio linking the internship to program standards.
  
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    ET 699 - Thesis Seminar

    (6.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.A. students. Students planning to propose a thesis topic enroll in this course as they begin the thesis process. Informal meetings scheduled at the convenience of participants and advisors provide an opportunity for critical discussion of planned research. Students receive credit upon successful completion of their thesis. Written or electronic permission of the advisor.

Emerging Leaders MBA

  
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    EL 700 - Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EL 699 . Restricted to Emerging Leaders MBA students. This course has two primary objectives: to provide a practical, action-oriented approach to business ethics that helps individuals who work in corporations and organizations decide what to do when they are faced with an ethical dilemma, and to explore modern corporate social responsibility-an approach to management that guides organizations beyond creating an ethical environment in the workplace. While pursuing these objectives, students study alternative perspectives on a wide range of contemporary business issues through readings and case studies. Ultimately, students see the extent to which ethics and moral and social responsibilities are intertwined. (Fall only)
  
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    EL 701 - Operations and Supply Chain Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Emerging Leaders MBA students. Focuses on how operations can be used for competitive advantage in today's world by improving the use of an organization's resources. Frameworks are provided by linking business processes, metrics, best practices, and technologies to add value for the ultimate customer of the firm. Topics cover enterprise decisions related to both product and service companies such as process mapping, value stream mapping, quality management, lean philosophy, continuous process improvement, inventory control, waiting line management, and capacity management. Pedagogical methods include lectures, simulations, cases, and projects. Students develop competencies in process analysis, value stream mapping, inventory control, and queuing management. (Spring only)
  
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    EL 702 - Marketing Strategy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Emerging Leaders MBA students. Explores marketing's role in creating value for the firm and its stakeholders in a global environment. Using analytical tools for decision making, students evaluate and formulate a marketing strategy across the product life cycle and in various levels of competitive intensity. Key topics include environmental analysis, marketing mix (product, price, promotion, and distribution strategy), segmentation, targeting, and positioning. (Spring only)
 

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