2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Dec 02, 2020  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Communication

  
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    CM 367 - Sports Writing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 205 . Students start with traditional game coverage and move toward more literary explorations of topics in sports. Students write news, features, opinion pieces, and essays. Readings range from journalistic examples to pieces and books by such authors as Norman Mailer, George Plimpton, George Will, and Roger Khan.
  
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    CM 368 - Entertainment, Media, and Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Today, entertainment media dominates our lives more than ever before. Content and platforms proliferate; people can listen to podcasts in the shower, watch YouTube clips while on the bus, and stream TV shows all night. This entertainment boom has occurred as democratic politics has become more fraught: U.S. electoral politics is dominated by partisan polarization and the rise of populist outsider candidates while Brexit is shaking the European Union. This course explores the relationship between these changes in entertainment media and democratic politics. How does the increasing proliferation of entertainment options and platforms shape political knowledge, civic engagement, and democratic citizenship? How is electoral politics affected by the rise of 'infotainment'? To what extent have television comedies and dramas shaped perceptions of crime and threat and helped drive changes in social attitudes about gender and sexuality? How accurate are fictional portrayals of politics on the big and small screen, and what do such portrayals teach the public about democracy? What does the future of entertainment and politics look like, and is it as dark as dystopian portrayals in pop culture might suggest? Same course as PS 368  
  
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    CM 371 - Web II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 312 . Students extend their knowledge of website design, publishing, aesthetics and concepts through community-focused projects.
  
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    CM 372 - Studio Television Production

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 324 . Students crew live-to-tape studio productions for telecast and streaming on the campus television station. Leadership, teamwork, technological innovations, ethics, and social responsibility are explored. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 374 - Documentary Production

    (3.00 cr.)

    An advanced video production course focused on producing documentaries on domestic diversity topics. Students research, write, shoot, edit, and present to the public. IAF
  
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    CM 375 - Video Animation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 324 . An advanced production class offering hands-on experiences in design and execution of state-of-the-art video animations for broadcast and interactive media applications. For mass communicators and media artists.
  
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    CM 376 - Media Training

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 227 . A course in professional skills for effective self-presentation in any communication medium. Media training formerly was the arcane concern of corporate spokespersons and politicians. Now, people increasingly live their lives in public view, with smart phone video capability available everywhere; social media outlets such as YouTube and Twitter; and the explosion in traditional media complements such as cable television and internet radio. Students learn how to conduct themselves in this mediated public environment and how to train others to do so. Topics include pitching to the media; understanding what journalists want; protecting from being misquoted or quoted out of context; and delivering key messages both in short windows and longer opportunities such as being a guest on a television show.
  
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    CM 377 - Media Relations

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 227  A vital skill for public relations professionals is their ability to communicate effectively with members of the media on behalf of an organization. Students are provided with the techniques and strategies needed to support the role of an organizational media relations manager with emphasis on serving as a spokesperson. This course looks at the media needs, including communication planning, tips, and techniques. Additionally, the course establishes a framework for a successful media relations program. A significant portion of the course requires students to participate as spokespersons in various scenario-based exercises.
  
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    CM 380 - Advanced Study in Communication

    (3.00 cr.)

    An upper-level, hands-on project class in professional media, guided by the sponsoring faculty member. Written or electronic permission of the sponsoring faculty member. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    CM 382 - Introduction to Book Publishing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Contemporary print media from the publisher's perspective, including editorial management, promotion, design, manufacturing, and new developments in the publishing industry. (Fall only)
  
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    CM 383 - Broadcast Journalism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 324 . Focuses on storytelling for broadcast television. Students learn writing and interviewing skills to help tell compelling stories for television news, magazine, and sports programs. Cross-media storytelling techniques also are taught to prepare students for "backpack" journalism careers for the web and cable.
  
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    CM 384 - Book Marketing and Promotion

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn to position books in the marketplace by direct sales and by wholesale distribution to chain and independent bookstores; write news releases; pitch review media; conduct print and electronic publicity campaigns; and plan author events. Projects support books published by Apprentice House. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 385 - Special Topics in Communication

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Varies with topic. An upper-level course in communication study. Topic announced when course is offered. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    CM 387 - Book Publishing: Manuscript Evaluation and Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students solicit and evaluate manuscripts submitted to Apprentice House for publication and work with authors to edit manuscripts and prepare them for publication.
  
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    CM 388 - Book Design and Production

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 322 . Principles of long-form visual communication are applied to computer-aided book design and layout. Students work with authors and editors to develop and implement cover and internal designs for books published by Apprentice House.
  
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    CM 389 - Media Presence and Performance

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 324 . Students learn the techniques used by broadcast journalists in presenting stories on the air. Topics include how to frame stories for field reporting, how to shape voice and body language for studio-based performance, how to conduct both short and long interviews on camera, and how to develop personal on-air presence. Recommended for students interested in careers in broadcast news both in front of and behind the camera.
  
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    CM 394 - Research Experience

    (3.00 cr.)

    Following the apprenticeship model, students work with professors on on-going qualitative or quantitative research projects. Research activities might include library database searches, development of questionnaires, interviews in the field, online surveys, collection and analysis of data, and research report writing. The course is ideally suited to seniors who can handle a significant amount of independent work. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 400 - Senior Capstone in Journalism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 205 , and one 300-level digital media or journalism specialization course. Restricted to seniors. Students work in teams to develop a magazine with multimedia components. Each team prepares a project prospectus outlining content and a business plan, and creates a prototype magazine for one or more media platforms, including print, video, or online. The finished magazine prototype may be submitted to a national contest. Required of communication majors with a journalism specialization. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 401 - Senior Capstone in Web and Print Media

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 322  and one 300-level digital media specialization course. Recommended Prerequisite: CM 312 , for students intending to work on web projects. Restricted to seniors. Students work in teams to create either small websites or promotional print materials for community clients. Students demonstrate their proficiency and creativity in a variety of digital media. An option for communication majors specializing in digital media. (Fall only)
  
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    CM 402 - Senior Capstone in Video Production

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 324 , CM 311  or CM 352  or CM 353  or CM 372  or CM 374  or CM 375  or CM 383  or CM 389 . Restricted to seniors. Students work in teams to produce videos that demonstrate their proficiency and creativity in a variety of genres, such as electronic news, documentary, advertising, or features. An option for communication majors specializing in digital media or journalism. (Spring only)
  
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    CM 403 - Senior Capstone in Advertising

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 226  and one 300-level advertising/public relations specialization course. Restricted to seniors. A capstone course for the advertising specialization. Students work in a simulated advertising agency environment in order to develop a comprehensive advertising plan and ad campaign on behalf of a client. Students demonstrate their ability to conduct appropriate research, develop advertising strategy, design a media plan, and develop a sales promotion program in service of a comprehensive plan. CM 403 or CM 404  required for communication majors specializing in advertising/public relations. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 404 - Senior Capstone in Public Relations

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 354 , CM 314  or CM 346  or CM 352  or CM 356  or CM 357  or CM 358  or CM 376  or CM 384 . Restricted to seniors. A capstone course for the public relations specialization integrating all facets of the public relations mix. Students demonstrate their ability to conduct research, develop a public relations program, and execute the plan. Generally, students work in teams to develop a campaign on behalf of a client. CM 403  or CM 404 required for communication majors specializing in advertising/public relations.
  
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    CM 411 - Exploring Digital Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Assesses the way the Internet and its applications have influenced the way we see others and ourselves, the way we interact, and even the way we think. Students investigate the social, political, cultural, intellectual, and economic impacts of Internet services such as Facebook, Twitter, Blogging, Second Life, the World Wide Web, and others. The course is organized around four major subject areas: the transformative nature of the Internet, the impact on interpersonal relationship, changes in marketing, and the legal and political implications of the Internet. Discussion includes critical personal and public policy issues such as privacy, civility, identity, and free speech.
  
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    CM 412 - Digital Diversity: Case Studies of the Global Village

    (3.00 cr.)

    A seminar on the past, present, and future of the idea that digital technologies-including video, the Internet, and social media-can help to foster cooperation and to overcome intolerance for cultural, religious, and ethnic diversity around the globe. Class discussion of key readings in primary texts prepares students for research projects in action-oriented pedagogies.
  
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    CM 421 - Communication Internship (150 Hours)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to juniors or seniors. With faculty guidance, students gain hands-on professional experience doing off-campus internships in advertising, broadcasting, journalism, writing, public relations, and print or web publishing at a site in-or out-of-state. Students must keep detailed records and complete online assignments while performing at least 150 hours of work at their chosen site. Course requirements include scheduled performance evaluations signed by the on-site supervisor. Written or electronic permission of the department's internship coordinator. Internships for degree credit may be paid or unpaid. May be taken once for degree credit; may be repeated for nondegree credit.
  
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    CM 423 - Communication Internship (50 Hours)

    (1.00 cr.)

    Restricted to juniors or seniors. With faculty guidance, students gain hands-on professional experience doing off-campus internships in advertising, broadcasting, journalism, writing, public relations, and print or web publishing. Students must keep detailed records and complete online assignments while performing at least 50 hours of work at their chosen site. Requirements include scheduled performance evaluations signed by the on-site supervisor. Written or electronic permission of the department's internship coordinator.  Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. May be repeated for non-degree credit only. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    CM 496 - Environmental Studies Experience

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone experience in the environmental and sustainability studies minor, in which a student arranges an internship, independent study, or research experience with a faculty sponsor to engage in an in-depth exploration of a topic associated with environmental or sustainability issues. Written or electronic permission of a sponsoring faculty member and the environmental and sustainability studies director. Generally completed during the senior year. IES
  
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    CM 498 - Forensic Studies Experience

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone experience in forensic studies in which a student may arrange an internship, independent study, or research experience with a faculty sponsor to engage in an in-depth exploration of a topic associated with forensic or criminal investigation. Written or electronic permission of a sponsoring faculty member. Generally completed during senior year; students should secure a faculty sponsor and obtain the approval of the forensic studies director by the end of junior year. IFS

Computer Science

  
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    CS 099 - Data Management Tools for Business

    (1.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the use of spreadsheets and databases for collecting, organizing, and presenting data to support operational decision making. Includes the use of functions; validation rules and referential integrity; relational databases; and the creation of charts, tables, queries, and reports. Closed to students who have taken CS 111 , CS 115 , or CS 118 . (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CS 111 - Introduction to Computers with Software Applications

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to computer science and software applications that includes the design and operation of personal computers, representation of data by computers, structure of operating systems, design and operation of computer networks, concepts of software design and programming, and social and ethical issues. Students get hands-on experience with spreadsheets, database management systems, and high-level programming. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    CS 115 - Cyber Security and Digital Forensics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to computer science fundamentals that underlie cyber security, digital forensics, and digital privacy. Also introduces principles for encoding, encrypting, and organizing digital data, and applying these principles to hands on work on recovering digital files, monitoring network intrusions, and detecting malicious software. To better understand the vulnerabilities and threats to personal, corporate, and national computer systems, students look at how malicious software operates, as well as look at available government and industry security standards, and best practices for protecting systems from these threats, while getting hands-on experience with data analysis and data organization.  Fulfills one math/science core requirement. IFS
  
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    CS 117 - Computers in Art and Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to computing and programming through algorithmic and interactive art. Students demonstrate the skills needed to program by writing programs that generate patterns, then connect those skills to the concepts of randomness, equations, creativity, and imagination. The question of whether computers can be creative is also considered, which leads to fundamental questions about the nature, limitations, and ethical use of computers and algorithms. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    CS 118 - Computers, Robots and Minds: Introduction to Intelligent Computing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Computing technology is changing the way that people interact, relax, think, and accomplish work. This course is an introduction to computer science focused around robots that have limited reasoning ability and yet can accomplish complex tasks. Hands-on laboratories allow students to gain experience developing logical thinking using a programming language to control a personal robot; conducting field studies to obtain data; storing and accessing data from a database using queries; performing data analysis with spreadsheet formulas; and developing decision analysis models. Students also grapple with social and philosophical implications of intelligent computers, what intelligent machines tell us about the nature of the human mind, and how an understanding of the human mind helps us create intelligent computers. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    CS 120 - Topics in Introductory Computer Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introductory exploration of a topic of current interest in computer science. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    CS 151 - Computer Science I

    (4.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to problem solving with the fundamentals of programming, enabling them to decompose complex problems into elementary steps for effective implementation in a modern programming language. Students work with numeric and textual data, procedural programming with conditionals and loops, basic linear data structures, and on testing their solutions. Problems may draw on topics in computer security, data encoding, graphics, games, financial analysis, physical models, and others. Provides a general survey of some of the major areas of computer science, such as digital logic, software engineering, computer graphics, artificial intelligence, theory of computation, object-oriented programming, and ethical and societal issues in computing. First course in the major's sequence. Must be passed with a C- or better to move to the next course. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.

     

  
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    CS 200 - Opportunities in STEM

    (1.00 cr.)

    The colloquium focuses on internships, research, and career options available to students in Computer Science, Physics, Mathematics, and Statistics (CPaMS) through speaker talks, career center workshops, and field trips to research and industry partners. This course is intended for natural and applied science majors. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Required for all CPaMS Scholars in their second year. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. Same course as MA 200 , PH 200 ST 200 . (Pass/Fail) (Fall only)
  
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    CS 212 - Object-Oriented Data Structures

    (4.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: At least a C- or better in CS 151   or CS 201 or, with an appropriate programming background, written permission of the department chair. Students learn to program in a high level object-oriented language, with emphasis on data storage and manipulation. Students should have previous experience in programming but do not need experience in an object-oriented language. Students learn essential object-oriented concepts including object, class, message, method, inheritance, and polymorphism. They also learn the analysis of algorithms to determine if a program is correct and efficient. They apply the object-oriented and analysis concepts to data structures such as stacks, queues, priority queues, maps, and trees, as well as algorithms such as sorting and searching. Must be passed with a C- or better to move to the next course. Required for computer science majors.
  
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    CS 218 - Computational Thinking: Exploring Computing through Robotics

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the great ideas of computing through hands-on experiments with robotics. The course explores the nature and limits of computers; engages with the philosophical and social implications of intelligent machines; and asks what the science of computing can tell us about creativity, reasoning, and the human mind. Students gain experience developing logical thinking using a programming language to control small robots; conducting field studies to obtain data; storing and accessing data from a database using queries; and performing data analysis with spreadsheet formulas. Fulfills one math/science core requirement. Same course as HN 218 .
  
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    CS 220 - Current Topics in Computer Science

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Varies with topic. A one-hour introductory exploration of a topic of current interest in computer science. Does not count toward fulfillment of degree requirements. May be repeated.
  
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    CS 295 - Discrete Structures

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 151  or CS 201; MA 109  or a score of 56 or better on Part I of the Math Placement Test or one year of high school calculus. Boolean algebra, combinatorics, inductive and deductive proofs, sets, graphs, functions, and recurrence relations. Same course as MA 295 . (Fall only)
  
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    CS 301 - Data Structures and Algorithms I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 202 ; CS 295  or MA 295  or MA 395  may be taken concurrently. Elementary data structures are designed and built according to principles of data encapsulation and abstraction. Associated algorithms are analyzed for efficiency. Introduces a UNIX-based platform and tools for programming. Must be passed with a C- or better to move to the next course.
  
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    CS 302 - Data Structures and Algorithms II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 301 . A continuation of CS 301 . An introduction to the study of algorithms using imperative programming in the GNU/Linux programming environment. Emphasizes software development tools, software testing, and empirical analysis using advanced data structures and algorithms. Attention is paid to lower level programming concerns such as memory layout and management. Must be passed with a C- or better to move to the next course.
  
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    CS 312 - Object-Oriented Software Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 202 or CS 212 . At least a C- or better in CS 202 or CS 212 . A continuation of CS 212 . Students learn how to design and implement flexible, reusable, and maintainable object-oriented programs. The course fosters a deeper understanding of object-oriented programming, including generics, inheritance, and composition as dual techniques for software reuse, forwarding versus delegation, and sub-classing versus sub-typing. Students apply these methods to the implementation and analysis of advanced data structures such as balanced trees, heaps, graphs, and related algorithms. Required for computer science majors. Closed to students who have taken CS 301 .
  
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    CS 366 - Computer Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: At least a C- or better in CS 312 . Introduces students to imperative programming in the GNU/Linux software development environment. Attention is paid to lower-level programming concerns such as memory layout and management, concurrency, threading, and synchronization, given their importance in all systems, but particularly in embedded processors and microcontrollers. This course stresses the understanding of how programs execute on modern architectures and how to measure and optimize performance.
  
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    CS 371 - Computer Engineering I

    (4.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 202  or CS 212 ; CS 295  or MA 295  or MA 395  may be taken concurrently. An introduction to the design and assembler programming of computers. Topics include Boolean algebra, combinatorial and sequential circuit design, and assembly language programming.
  
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    CS 420 - Computer Science Research

    (1-4.00 cr.)

    Supervised research projects may be taken for credit by qualified students. Requires a preliminary paper outlining the scope of the problem and the associated literature. Requires progress reports and a final research paper. Written or electronic permission of the sponsoring computer science faculty member.
  
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    CS 451 - Programming Languages

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 302  or CS 312 . A study of important programming language concepts. Topics include imperative, functional, logic, and object-oriented programming as well as new programming paradigms. An introduction to the formal study of programming language specification and analysis. (Spring only)
  
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    CS 455 - Graphical User Interface Design and Implementation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 202  or CS 212 . Restricted to juniors or seniors. Covers the design, implementation, and evaluation of graphical user interfaces for computer applications. Topics include the human factors that direct interface design; existing standards for human/computer interaction; event-driven programming in a modern GUI system; and techniques for testing user interface effectiveness.
  
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    CS 456 - Web Programming

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 202  or CS 212 . A review of client-side and server-side web development languages and practices. Covers HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in addition to a variety of server-side scripting languages for processing user input. Also covers the basics of good web design, in terms of making both a usable and a working website.
  
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    CS 457 - Introduction to Computer Networks

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 202  or CS 312 . Local area networks of computers. An introduction to telecommunications. Network architectures: physical, data link, network, transport and application layers, with detailed attention to Network layers protocols including routing; internetworking (IP); transport layers (TCP); application layer internals including DNS, electronic mail, and the Web.
  
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    CS 462 - Algorithm Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 302  or CS 312 ; CS 295  or MA 295  or MA 395  or equivalent. Design of computer algorithms and analysis of their performance. Includes dynamic programming, graph algorithms, and NP-completeness. (Spring only)
  
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    CS 464 - Object-Oriented Analysis and Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 302  or CS 312 . A survey of object-oriented analysis, design, and programming including encapsulation, information hiding, and inheritance. Several modeling languages and object-oriented programming languages are studied. Also includes a survey of patterns and strategies.
  
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    CS 466 - Operating Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 302  or CS 366 , CS 371 . Considers processes, process synchronization and mutual exclusion, and techniques for memory allocation, scheduling, and disk management. Surveys current computer operating systems and discusses research in distributed operating systems. (Fall only)
  
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    CS 471 - Computer Architecture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 371 ; or EG 071 , EG 360 , EG 471 . Design and understanding of the computer system as a whole unit. Performance evaluation and its role in computer system design; instruction set architecture design, datapath design, and optimizations (e.g., ALU); control design; single cycle, multiple cycle, and pipeline implementations of processor; hazard detection and forwarding; memory hierarchy design; and cache memories, virtual memory, peripheral devices, and input/output. Same course as EG 478 . (Fall only)
  
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    CS 476 - Electronic Digital Circuits

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 371 ; or EG 071 , EG 331 , EG 432 , EG 471 . Design and testing of complex sequential state machines including machine controllers, modulator/demodulator circuits and CPUs using HDL. Design and testing of several 8-bit multipliers, binary to decimal converters, a CISC CPU, several RISC CPUs, a microcontroller with microprogramming as a controller for a RISC CPU and a CISC CPU, methods to implement hardware for parallel processing, and a wide variety of CPU interrupt structures. Also included are introductions to FPGAs, machine-to-machine communications, using the OSI model. Same course as EG 476 .
  
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    CS 478 - Theory of Computation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 302  or CS 312 ; CS 295  or MA 295  or MA 395 . Basic results on the capabilities, limitations, and applications of formal models of computation. Includes finite state machines, push down automata, grammars, computable and noncomputable functions, and NP-completeness.
  
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    CS 479 - Topics in Computer Engineering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 371   Restricted to senior computer science majors. An advanced course in computer engineering. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    CS 482 - Software Engineering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 301  or written permission of the instructor; or CS 312  and CS 366 . Restricted to seniors. Techniques of software design, development, maintenance: requirements analysis, design methods, implementation techniques, testing strategies, and project management. Life cycles and process models. A team project serves as a case study. (Fall only)
  
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    CS 483 - Software Testing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 302  or CS 312 . Techniques for evaluating software and verifying that software conforms to its requirements: static and dynamic analysis, theoretical foundations, and formal proofs; error, fault, and failure classification; test planning; software quality assurance; metrics; consistency.
  
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    CS 484 - Artificial Intelligence

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 301  or CS 312 ; ST 210  or written permission of the instructor. An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence. Topics include search, logic for knowledge representation and deduction, and machine learning. Some current application areas such as natural language, vision, and robotics are surveyed.
  
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    CS 485 - Database Management Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 212  or CS 301 . Concepts and structures necessary to design, implement, and use a database management system: logical and physical organization; various database models with emphasis on the relational model; data description languages; query facilities including SQL; the use of embedded SQL.
  
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    CS 486 - Computer Graphics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 212  or CS 301 ; MA 301  or written permission of the instructor. An introduction to the mathematics and algorithms required to create two- and three-dimensional computer images. Covers the modeling and display of objects, scenes, and lighting in high-level computer languages.
  
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    CS 489 - Topics in Computer Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to junior or senior computer science majors or written permission of the instructor. An advanced course in computer science. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    CS 491 - Technical Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of innovation and entrepreneurship. Introduces theoretical frameworks and examples of issues, skills, and challenges of innovating in the fields of science and engineering. Establishes multidisciplinary skill sets for creating and managing technology-based entrepreneurship. Includes idea generation evaluation, intellectual property, teamwork, business plans, financing through private and public sources, developing and marketing products, and legal issues. Includes a semester-long group project with a faculty and/or industrial mentor. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Same course as EG 491  and PH 491 .
  
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    CS 496 - Computer Science Project I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 482 . Students work with an external client on a substantial research or software development project. Students gather project requirements through consultation with their clients and document them in a proposal approved by the client and the course instructor. Classroom discussions focus on social and ethical issues in computer science, as well as reading, critiquing, and presenting technical literature. An oral presentation and a formal paper conclude the course.
  
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    CS 497 - Computer Science Project II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 496 . A continuation of CS 496 .
  
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    CS 499 - Computer Science Internship

    (1.00 cr.)

    Restricted to junior or senior computer science majors or minors. Students gain a better understanding of the application of computer science through work experience. Interns are required to work in a computer science-related business or professional environment under the guidance of an on-site supervisor for a minimum of 100 hours. The location may be in- or out-of-state, on a paid or unpaid basis. Course requirements include a weekly work log, a scheduled performance evaluation signed by the on-site supervisor, and an updated résumé, and cover letter. Written or electronic permission of the instructor or department chair. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. May be repeated 3 times for credit.

Economics/Business Economics

  
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    EC 102 - Microeconomic Principles

    (3.00 cr.)

    Investigates how individuals in market economies make decisions about what goods will be produced, how they will be produced, and for whom they will be produced. Students learn to analyze the impacts of changes in markets; illustrate the concepts of consumer demand and production; and explain the process of profit maximization under various market structures. Topics include the laws of supply and demand; behavior of firms in competitive and noncompetitive markets; functioning of labor and capital markets; poverty and income inequality; economics and the environment; economic systems in other countries. GT
  
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    EC 103 - Macroeconomic Principles

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . Introduces macroeconomic equilibrium, its impact on unemployment and inflation, and the effect of economic policy initiatives on that equilibrium. Students learn to predict the qualitative effect on changes in economic aggregates on each other and on GDP. Topics include the business cycle; national income and product accounting; equilibrium in the aggregate demand-aggregate supply model; the multiplier; the national debt; financial intermediaries; money and its creation; fiscal and monetary policy; comparative advantage and the gains from international trade; commercial policy; foreign exchange markets; and the balance of payments. Effects of international transactions are incorporated with each topic. GT
  
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    EC 220 - Business Statistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: MA 151  or MA 251  or equivalent. MA 151  or MA 251  may be taken concurrently. Introduces the concepts and application of statistics in management. Students learn to apply estimation and hypothesis testing to univariate and multivariate business problems. Topics include descriptive statistics and statistical inference; multiple regression; correlation; and trend and seasonal time series analysis. GT
  
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    EC 301 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , MA 151  or MA 251 . Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors. Analyzes the economy-wide forces, policies, and institutions that directly determine or otherwise influence long-term economic trends and short-term fluctuations. Students learn the central lessons of contemporary macroeconomics; gain confidence in their ability to mathematically model and discuss economic policies in professional settings; and acquire the skills needed to begin macroeconometric studies. Topics include the key ideas of Nobel Prize winners; national income and product accounting; balance of payments; unemployment; employment; labor force participation; international trade and finance; monetary fiscal policies; facts and theories of long-term economic growth; facts and theories of business cycles; the powerful role of expectations and policy credibility; and modern electronic connections among all types of international markets. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    EC 302 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , MA 151  or MA 251 . Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors. Analyzes the motives, constraints, and behaviors of consumers and producers. This course builds on EC 102  concepts with mathematical modeling. Students learn the foundations of supply and demand analysis, cost analysis, and pricing strategy; refinements of these foundations under different market structures and regulation environments; and basic market and policy research. Topics include consumer preferences, budget constraints, work incentives, and demand patterns; producer input-output technology, cost of production, factor demand, and product supply patterns; entrepreneurial behavior; market structures such as perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and monopoly; antitrust law and regulation institutions; property rights; and economic notions of voter behavior.
  
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    EC 304 - Survey of International Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , or written permission of the instructor. Utilizes the tools of economic principle to analyze the global economy that is increasingly open to trade and capital flows across borders. Major topics are international trade in goods and services, and the workings of international finance, particularly the foreign exchange market. Additional topics include a comparison of economic trade systems, regional trade arrangements, and the role of institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund on the global economy. GT (Fall/Spring)
  
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    EC 305 - Mathematical Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , MA 151  or MA 251 . A grade of C or better required in all prerequisites. Investigates the use of applied mathematics in economics and strengthens the mathematical skills of economics majors. Students learn to structure, discuss, and analyze fundamental economics using calculus and linear algebra. Topics include the structure of constrained optimization problems, market equilibrium analysis, comparative statics of economic models, distinction between stocks and flows, and the analysis of dynamic systems.
  
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    EC 310 - American Economic History

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102  or written permission of the instructor. Examines the economic forces underlying historical development in America from the pre-Colombian period to modern times. Students develop skills in the use of economic tools of analysis and an enhanced understanding of the application of the laws of economic behavior to events of historical significance. Topics include problems of exploration and migration; the economics of revolution; the institution of slavery; entrepreneurship and development; causes and consequences of the Great Depression; and the economics of political and cultural change. IU
  
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    EC 320 - The Political Economy of War

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 103 . The economic causes and consequences of war. Topics include how war transforms economic and political institutions; economic interventionism as a cause of war; laissez-faire as the antitheses of war; the ratchet effect of war on the growth of government; the political economy of the military-industrial-congressional complex; the myths of wartime prosperity and nation building; hidden and not-so-hidden costs of war; how wars are financed; and who benefits from war. GT/IFS
  
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    EC 330 - Law and Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . An application of the tools of economic analysis to several key areas of the law. Topics include contracts, environmental policy, criminal law and crime deterrence, discrimination in employment and housing, landlord-tenant laws, property law, torts, and zoning. IFS
  
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    EC 340 - Economic Problems of Cities

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . An application of the tools of economic analysis to some of the most pressing contemporary problems of American cities: poverty, crime, job loss, low educational attainment, affordable housing, and sprawl. Policies that affect the property rights of urban citizens are examined, and the effects of these policies on a city's stock of physical, human, and social capital are assessed.
  
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    EC 341 - Special Topics in Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , and 60 credits; or written permission of the instructor. Examines a selected area of economics with in-depth coverage of concepts and applications. Students engage in readings and discussion in selected areas of economics. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. GT
  
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    EC 348 - Development Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 . Examines the theory and practice of the economic development of nations. The first segment focuses on the meaning of development. The second segment considers the internal and external forces that encourage or discourage economic development. The course closes with a consideration of special topics such as the link between development, environment, education, and income distribution. Closed to students who have taken EC 448. GT
  
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    EC 350 - Capitalism and Its Critics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . Provides students with an opportunity to read and think carefully about some of the major writings that defend and criticize capitalism, especially on moral and philosophical grounds. Topics for discussion include the industrial revolution; causes and consequences of the Great Depression; economic justice; wealth creation; environmentalism; economics and race; and the social responsibility of business.
  
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    EC 360 - Environmental Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . Recommended Prerequisite: EC 302 . Examines contemporary issues of environmental quality, natural resource allocation, and conservation from the economic perspective. Students develop an understanding of the history of the environmental movement and learn to analyze environmental issues using economic tools. Topics include benefit-cost analysis, property rights, incentive-based pollution control policies, and a review of government regulatory performance. GT/IES
  
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    EC 370 - Cost-Benefit Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . Presents the foundations and methods of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) used to evaluate environmental, health, and safety regulations. Students learn to develop and use CBA. Topics include the economic and ethical principles underlying CBA; the distinction between real costs and transfers; alternative methods for estimating benefits and costs; the discounting of benefits and costs; risk assessment; and federal guidelines for conducting CBA. GT
  
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    EC 380 - Sports Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 220  (may be taken concurrently). Applies the tools of price theory to professional and amateur sports. Students develop analytic tools useful in the management of sports (and other) enterprises and the evaluation of strategy in the contests themselves. Topics include market demand analysis; performance measurement and compensation of athletes; economic impact analysis and stadium subsidies; labor market discrimination; and collegiate sports.
  
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    EC 390 - Growth, Globalization and History

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102  or written permission of the instructor. Combines an examination of historical events with basic economic tools and principles to provide a different perspective on European development. Attention is focused on important economic processes that help to shape the European historical record. Students gain an introduction to economic reasoning and methods from the perspective of their relevance to an understanding of history. Students have the opportunity to use economic concepts to obtain a deeper understanding of historical questions. Topics include the effects of European nationalism; the nature and consequences of the Industrial Revolution; the effects of the Transportation Revolution; the economics of European migration patterns; and the creation of an international economy. GT
  
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    EC 405 - Game Theory and the Economics of Information

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , MA 151  or MA 251 . A grade of C or better required in all prerequisites. Recommended Prerequisite: EC 302 . Game theory is the science of strategic thinking; the study of learning how to outdo an adversary, knowing that the adversary is trying to do the same to you. This course introduces students to this science of strategic thinking or game theory. Strategic thinking is practiced at work or at home in order to survive. Business persons and corporations must use competitive strategies to survive. Politicians devise campaigns to get elected and legislative strategies to implement their visions. The course, therefore, includes applications to the business world, finance, management, law-enforcement, and political economy. It also covers applications of game theory to the economics of information (i.e., making strategic choices when there is limited information about your adversaries). Topics such as moral hazard, adverse selection, and strategic bidding in auctions are covered.
  
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    EC 420 - Econometrics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , and EC 220  or ST 210 . A grade of C or better required in all prerequisites. Develops and applies the tools of economic theory, mathematics, and statistics to economic phenomena. Students learn to investigate the specification, estimation, and interpretation of empirical economic relationships using least squares techniques. Simple and multiple regression, alternative specifications, and simultaneous equations are used in case studies to form a foundation of experience for students to become applied statisticians and economists.
  
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    EC 425 - Applied Economic Forecasting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 103 , EC 420  or ST 381 , MA 151  or MA 251 . A grade of C or better required in all prerequisites. Forecasts play a crucial role in the formation of economic policy and business decisions. As a result, accurate predictions of the future are critical for the public and private sector alike. This course introduces students to the techniques used by professional economists in business and government to model the complex processes generating data through time and to make real world forecasts. The steps and methods required to develop a forecast-from understanding the properties of time-series data to forecast evaluation-are defined. Topics include modeling trends, seasonality and cycles, ARMA and ARIMA models, forecast combination, vector-autoregression, and nonlinear methods. (Spring only)
  
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    EC 430 - Monetary Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 103 . Recommended Prerequisite: EC 301 . Examines micro- and macroeconomic monetary issues, problems, and theory. Students learn to predict the effect of monetary events on financial markets and the real economy. Topics include functions and measures of money; interest rates, present value, and yield; capital asset pricing model; diversification; risk and term structure of interest rates; financial intermediaries; creation and determination of the money supply; the Federal Reserve System; tools, goals, and targets of monetary policy; demand for money; money and real GDP; transmissions mechanisms.
  
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    EC 435 - Public Sector Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . Recommended Prerequisite: EC 302 . Examines the nonmarket provision of goods and services. Students learn to analyze public expenditure and tax policies and investigate their impact on income distribution and resource allocation. Topics include the analysis of collective decision making and the application of cost-benefit analysis.
  
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    EC 440 - International Financial Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 103 . Recommended Prerequisite: EC 301 . Examines the financial side of international economic activity. Topics include balance of payments; foreign exchange; spot markets and forward markets; covered and uncovered interest parity conditions; monetary and portfolio balance models of exchange rate determination; macroeconomic policy in an open economy; under fixed and flexible exchange rates; optimum currency areas; and issues surrounding the European Monetary Union. GT
  
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    EC 446 - International Trade

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , EC 302 , or written permission of the instructor. Investigates the theory and practice of international trade. The course begins with an analysis of the basis and gains from trade and considers trade policy and obstructions to trade. It reaches focus on special topics such as the relationship between trade and the environment and the development of other economies. GT
  
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    EC 450 - Managerial Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , EC 220 . Develops expertise in applying microeconomic analysis to practical business management decisions using a combination of economic theory, quantitative tools, and practical exercises. Students identify and analyze aspects of business strategy decisions. Topics include demand and cost, including the theory and how to apply it in a practical way; pricing; competitive strategies; and the impact of the environment of business and governmental actions on business decision making.
  
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    EC 460 - Business and Government

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . Recommended Prerequisite: EC 302 . Examines the nature of business behavior in competitive and noncompetitive markets and the nature and consequences of government regulation of this behavior. Students acquire tools useful in the development of competitive strategies and develop a sophisticated understanding of regulatory institutions and behavior. Topics include collusion; mergers and acquisitions; predatory behavior and monopolization; and emerging deregulation of telecommunication, transportation, and financial institutions.
  
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    EC 470 - Pricing Strategy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , EC 220 . Develops expertise in pricing for profitability. Economics and marketing tools are used to consider how firms can successfully price in a variety of situations. Topics include competition, the role of cost in pricing, successful price changes, life cycle pricing, when to negotiate, and price sensitivity. The course is a mix of theory and practical application to frequently occurring business situations. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    EC 480 - Labor Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . Recommended Prerequisite: EC 103 , EC 302 . Individuals make decisions on how much to work, where to work, and how to utilize the earnings from their labor. Firms develop compensation systems and make hiring decisions to efficiently extract the most from their workers, and governments make decisions on what policies are required to regulate the labor market. At a micro level, these decisions determine a family's financial resources, whether college is a good investment, and whether women face wage discrimination. At a macro level, these decisions determine the level of poverty, inequality, unemployment, and the generosity of the social safety net. This course introduces students to economic analysis of these decisions and their outcomes. Topics include wage determination and structure; human capital theory and returns to education; unemployment and search theory; unions; immigration; minimum wage; and social assistance programs.
  
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    EC 490 - Health Economics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 . Recommended Prerequisite: EC 302 . Examines the basic concepts and models of health economics. Students learn to understand and critique the health care industry and proposed policies. Topics include the institutional and economic structure of the health care industry; the incentives provided by the market, government, and insurance; the private and public demand; production; and the political economy of health care.
  
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    EC 491 - Environmental Studies Experience

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone experience in the environmental and sustainability studies minor, in which a student arranges an internship, independent study, or research experience with a faculty sponsor to engage in an in-depth exploration of a topic associated with environmental or sustainability issues. Written or electronic permission of a sponsoring faculty member and the environmental and sustainability studies director. Generally completed during the senior year. IES
  
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    EC 492 - Economics International Study Tour

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One 300-level or 400-level economics course (may be taken concurrently). Restricted to juniors or seniors with cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. Demonstrates the applied economic and international aspects of classroom concepts and theories in an international setting. This course involves a classroom component and a study tour component with site visits to organizations in the Caribbean or Central America. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Preference may be given to economics majors and minors. May be repeated once with different travel destination. (Spring only)
  
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    EC 496 - Independent Study in Stata for Economists

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 420  (may be taken concurrently). An independent laboratory course in the use of Stata. Stata is a statistical software package that is widely used throughout the government, business, industrial, scientific, and academic sectors. Proficiency in using Stata for data management, analysis, and reporting is developed. The focus is on developing Stata computer experience and extensive project work while reviewing business statistics and econometrics. Closed to students who have taken or plan to take ST 365 .
 

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