2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Mar 05, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Physics

  
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    PH 415 - Quantum Mechanics I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 307  and PH 312 , or written permission of the department chair. A study of quantum physics based on the Schrödinger Wave Equation and its solutions for various physically interesting systems. Applications include atomic and molecular physics, plus other topics contingent on time and interest.
  
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    PH 416 - Quantum Mechanics II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 415 . A study of the formal structure of quantum mechanics including matrix mechanics, operators, and spin. Includes more advanced applications such as scattering theory, perturbations, and quantum statistics.
  
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    PH 417 - Electricity and Magnetism I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: MA 351 , PH 316  or written permission of the department chair. An examination of Maxwell's equations in free space. Includes the calculation of electric and magnetic fields from charge and current distributions, as well as the creation/propagation of electromagnetic waves.
  
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    PH 418 - Electricity and Magnetism II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 417 . Electric and magnetic fields in matter and the relativistic formulation of electrodynamics.
  
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    PH 480 - Advanced Topics in Physics

    (3.00 cr.)

    An advanced course in one or more areas of special interest. Possible topics include solid state physics, nuclear and particle physics, general relativity, astrophysics, statistical mechanics, advanced mechanics, optics, or computational physics. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    PH 484 - Methods of Theoretical Physics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: MA 351 , PH 307 , and PH 312 ; or written permission of the instructor. An introduction to advanced mathematical techniques which are often used in physical theory. Includes elliptic integrals, spherical harmonics, Bessel functions, Fourier analysis, complex analysis, and calculus of variations.
  
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    PH 491 - Technical Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of technical innovation and entrepreneurship. Introduces theoretical frameworks and examples of issues, skills, and challenges of innovating in the fields of science and engineering. Establishes multi-disciplinary skill sets for creating and managing technology-based entrepreneurship. Includes idea generation, evaluation, intellectual property, teamwork, business plans, financing through private and public sources, developing and marketing products, and legal issues. Includes a semester-long group project with a faculty and/or industrial mentor. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Same course as CS491 and EG491.
  
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    PH 493 - Advanced Laboratory

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 294 , PH 312 . A laboratory that emphasizes extended experiments requiring equipment design and originality. A public presentation of results is required.
  
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    PH 495 - Senior Honors Thesis I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 307 , PH 312 , and written or electronic permission of the department chair. A full-year research project providing the opportunity for students to pursue an area of special interest. A preliminary paper is required outlining the nature and scope of the problem, the associated literature, and the proposed contribution. Progress reports and a final research paper are required. By invitation only. Must be followed by PH 496 .
  
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    PH 496 - Senior Honors Thesis II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 495 . A continuation of PH 495 .
  
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    PH 498 - Forensic Studies Experience

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone experience in forensic studies in which a student may arrange an internship, independent study, or research experience with a faculty sponsor to engage in an in depth exploration of a topic associated with forensic or criminal investigation. Written or electronic permission of a sponsoring faculty member. Generally completed during senior year; students should secure a faculty sponsor and obtain the approval of the forensic studies director by the end of junior year. IFS

Political Science

  
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    PS 101 - Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    The basic principles and problems of political science centered on the origin, powers, and limitations of the state and the nature of the political process.
  
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    PS 102 - American Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    The nature and concepts of the federal government; the function and operations of its three branches- executive, legislative, and judicial; the role of political parties and pressure groups. IU
  
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    PS 301 - Asian Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    The politics of Asia in comparative perspective.
  
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    PS 302 - Chinese Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Will the twenty-first century be the "Chinese century"? The course seeks to answer this question by studying the legacies of the pre-1949 era, the impact of the Mao era, and the continuing sources of economic growth and political instability in contemporary China through the writings of Mao, documentary films, and the latest work of political scientists today. GT/IA
  
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    PS 303 - Latin American Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    The politics of Latin America in comparative perspective. GT/IL
  
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    PS 304 - Politics of the Middle East

    (3.00 cr.)

    The politics of the Middle East in comparative perspective. GT
  
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    PS 305 - Natural Law in Political and Legal Thought

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of natural law doctrines from Greek and Roman speculations to contemporary debates on the possibility and content of a natural law. A review of the writings of various natural law thinkers is undertaken from both an historical and analytical perspective.
  
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    PS 306 - Politics of Russia

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to Russia in the twenty-first century, emphasizing its political system and foreign policy. An independent research paper on one aspect of this fascinating country is required. GT
  
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    PS 307 - The Global Politics of Migration

    (3.00 cr.)

    One of the most enduring questions of global politics is why humans move from their home communities to other places, often at great cost and personal risk. This course introduces students to the main approaches to the study of international migration, including the impact of immigration on the host nation. A significant portion of the course focuses on forced migration and refugee policies. Students complete an independent research paper using migration data, in addition to course readings. GT
  
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    PS 308 - China and Globalization

    (3.00 cr.)

    During the past three decades, China's development has sparked unprecedented changes at home and abroad, leading critics to lay blame and admirers to cheer its impact on the world economy and political stability. The world's most populous country under a Communist regime has plunged into capitalist practices with abandon. Is China's quest for energy, minerals, land, water, and security fundamentally altering the world? Or, is it drawing China further into the existing international rules and institutions? Students examine the process of globalization as it is reshaping China domestically and how it is remaking the world. GT/IA
  
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    PS 314 - Public Opinion and American Democracy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Deals with the origins, nature, content, and impact of American public opinion. Role of demographics and economics on the distribution of public sentiment is noted; so are surprising departures from "conventional wisdoms" regarding its character. IU
  
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    PS 315 - American Political Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    What factors explain the "exceptional" character of the American state and American politics more generally? What roles have America's political institutions as well as its political ideas and rhetoric played in society and the economy? What are the dominant patterns, causes, and consequences of political change in American history? Answers to these and other questions concerning the development of the American state are sought through focus on key moments of state-building and institutional development from its founding to the present. IU
  
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    PS 316 - American Political Parties

    (3.00 cr.)

    The continuing combat between Democrats and Republicans in the electoral arena. Focus on contemporary studies of the American electorate and its behavior. Attention to congressional and other elections as well as those at the presidential level. IU
  
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    PS 317 - Contemporary Campaigns and Elections

    (3.00 cr.)

    A thorough examination of modern campaigns, electoral strategy, and campaign finance.
  
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    PS 318 - Media and Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    What impact do media institutions and actors have on public opinion, governing, and the substance of public policy? Students examine how media routines affect what constitutes news; how political elites use media strategies for campaigning and governing; and how the public consumes and perceives media messages about politics. IU
  
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    PS 319 - Interest Groups in American Democracy

    (3.00 cr.)

    An in-depth look at how interest groups and lobbyists function inside the Washington beltway. The course strikes a balance between practical, strategic, and theoretical issues, including interest group formation and maintenance, lobbying, influencing elections, and group representation in a democratic society. IU
  
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    PS 320 - Environmental Politics and Sustainability in U.S.

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the politics of a variety of environmental issues in the United States, including climate change, energy usage, food policy, and urban planning. Particular attention is given to the role played by public opinion, media, interest groups, and social movements in shaping environmental politics and policy, and to the practical, political, and ethical dilemmas raised by these issues. IES (Fall only) (Odd Years)
  
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    PS 321 - Religion and Politics in America

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the attempts by religious groups, movements, and interests to influence American Politics through agenda setting, lobbying, demonstrations, and electoral activities. Is "religion and politics" a toxic mix? How do religious interests compete in the political arena? Is the United States a "Christian nation"? IU
  
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    PS 323 - Gender in American Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides students with a critical examination of how gender matters in American politics. The course explores the different ways that men and women participate in politics through both traditional and nontraditional means and the difference such participation makes to public policy.
  
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    PS 324 - State and Local Politics and Policymaking

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the process and politics of policymaking at the state level in our federal system. Students seek understandings of the fluctuations in national and state government power over time, as well as how politics and policymaking differ among the states and between the states and the federal government.
  
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    PS 325 - Introduction to Public Policy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the politics and processes that govern policy making and policy implementation in the American political system. Combining substantive knowledge about a variety of public policy areas with multiple theoretical perspectives about policy processes and political institutions, this course focuses on how the national policy agenda is set, where policy alternatives are developed, and the influence of governmental and nongovernmental actors in policy making. IU
  
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    PS 326 - Congress: The Legislative Process

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the political and institutional factors that determine how and whether legislation becomes law. The role of parties, committees, and other House and Senate legislative institutions in the legislative process are examined. What factors promote and hinder Congress' ability to pass laws in the public interest? IU
  
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    PS 327 - Congressional Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the politics of Congress, both as a collection of individual members and as an institution. Using the whole of congressional history, students examine changes in congressional representation and elections, the politics of lawmaking, the role of Congress in the separation of powers, and Congress' impact on society. IU
  
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    PS 328 - Statesmen and Tyrants

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the nature and dilemmas of political leadership. Examines the actions and reflections of notable rulers from a variety of regimes and historical periods. Pericles, Caesar, Charlemagne, Bismark, Lincoln, Lenin, Churchill, DeGaulle.
  
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    PS 329 - The Modern American Presidency

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the presidency since FDR in theory and practice, placing special emphasis on the concept of presidential power. The personal and institutional politics of the oval office in war and peace, crisis and conspiracy. IU
  
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    PS 330 - Strategic Intelligence and American Democracy

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to one of the least understood sectors of the American government, the intelligence community. Examines the missions of the major agencies linked to intelligence collection and analysis, and explores the roles they have played and the challenges they have posed to the democratic state since the second World War. IU
  
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    PS 331 - Political Responses to Crisis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the reactions of the executive branch to unanticipated domestic and international events. Students examine both the institutional mechanisms and the political imperatives generated in cases such as the Cuban Missile Crisis, the onset of the First World War, and 9/11. Is the "energy in the executive" touted by Hamilton up to the challenges of the twenty-first century?
  
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    PS 333 - Politics and Science: The Biotech Revolution

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students examine the political and ethical questions arising from advances in biotechnology. Possible topics include cloning, stem cell research, animal-human chimeras, genetic engineering, and nanotechnology.
  
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    PS 337 - Analytical and Legal Reasoning

    (3.00 cr.)

    Uses various texts from judicial politics, legal theory, and rhetoric to explore the relationship between law and reason.  Ideally suited for students interested in taking the LSAT, attending law school, or simply developing their reasoning skills. IFS
  
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    PS 338 - Constitutional Law I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to the constitutional principles that structure governmental power, focusing in particular on the limits on governmental action imposed by federalism and the separation of powers. IFS
  
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    PS 339 - Constitutional Law II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to the constitutional principles that govern the relationship between individuals and the state, focusing in particular on the limits on governmental action imposed by
    the due process and equal protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. IFS
  
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    PS 341 - Constitutional Law: Power in the National System

    (3.00 cr.)

    A case and doctrinal approach to the Constitutional issues involved with the "separation of powers" system and American federalism. Focuses on the growth of presidential power, the use of congressional power, and the place of judicial power in the United States government. A visit to the Supreme Court is planned. IU
  
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    PS 342 - Equal Protection Law

    (3.00 cr.)

    A case and doctrinal approach to Supreme Court interpretations of the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment: racial, gender, wealth, etc.; discrimination; affirmative action. IU
  
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    PS 343 - Crime, the Individual, and Society

    (3.00 cr.)

    America's means for controlling undesirable behavior include criminal law. Examines how much behavior criminal law controls; how crimes are handled by courts; and what notions of individualism, criminality, and " justice" emerge from criminal law process. IFS/IU
  
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    PS 344 - Civil Liberties I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to the constitutional principles that govern the relationship between individuals and the state. The course explores the concept of national citizenship and examines the limits on governmental action imposed by the First Amendment, as well as the due process and equal protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. The state action doctrine and the power of Congress and the courts to remedy constitutional violations are also introduced. A visit to the Supreme Court is planned. IU
  
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    PS 345 - Civil Liberties II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Freedoms of the first and fourteenth amendments of the United States Constitution. Focuses on the controversies regarding speech, press, religion, assembly, racial discrimination, and voting rights. A visit to the Supreme Court is planned. IU
  
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    PS 346 - Law and Religion

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to the religion clauses of the First Amendment -- the establishment clause, which prohibits the government from promoting religion, and the free exercise clause, which guarantees religious liberty.
  
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    PS 350 - Comparative Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the study of countries through comparing and contrasting their domestic political, economic, and social institutions and practices. Deliberate comparison of two or more different political systems and cultures enable students to develop a global perspective in understanding government in our current era of transformation. GT
  
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    PS 351 - Third World Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    The difficulties and complexities of the long trek from tradition to modernity. IA
  
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    PS 352 - Gender, Human Rights, and Conflict

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines armed conflict as a gendered phenomenon. It begins by asking how gendered relations of power sustain and reproduce various aspects of contemporary warfare and its aftermath. In order to address this query, students engage with readings on how gender figures in the causes of war; the barriers to promoting and protecting gender rights during war and how they may be overcome; and the global movements to incorporate gender more fully in post-conflict reconstruction policies and reforms. Readings include feminist theories on international relations, peace and conflict; substantive empirical work on gender rights violations in conflict zones; and policy documents from both domestic and international forums on peace-building efforts. GT/IG/IPJ
  
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    PS 353 - Global Democratization

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the foundations and growth of democracy, in theory and practice, from the institutions of ancient Greece and the Renaissance Italian republics, through early English and American democracy, up to late twentieth century democratization. Countries in different stages of democratization are studied: Russia, South Africa, China, and Chile. Country studies cover various aspects of democratization including economics, institutions, the transition from communism, and globalization. GT
  
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    PS 355 - Religion and the State in Asia

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students grapple with the contentious relationship between religion and politics, analyzing ways that states have made use of, attempted to keep apart from, and tried to exterminate religious beliefs among their populations. Three sociological approaches to religion are studied and applied to cases of religion-state interaction. By tracing the religious and political histories of Japan, India, and China, students grasp the commonalities between religious and nationalist mobilization; identify beliefs and organization of three religions practiced in Asia (Shinto, Hinduism, and Christianity); and analyze the points of conflict that emerge as a consequence of different religion-state arrangements. GT
  
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    PS 357 - The Politics of Globalization

    (3.00 cr.)

    In globalization flows of people, ideas, and resources across state borders affect politics, power, and wealth in often unpredictable ways. Through film, supplemented by written texts, students study transnational issues such as international trade, the environment, social movements, and immigration. GT
  
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    PS 359 - Approaches to American Foreign Policy

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of American foreign policy since World War II. Compares the usefulness of real politik, Marxist, bureaucratic, and pluralist approaches in understanding post-1945 events such as the Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam, and the Gulf War. GT/IU
  
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    PS 360 - Transitional Justice

    (3.00 cr.)

    Since World War II, the use of human rights trials, truth commissions, and other justice mechanisms has become a common strategy to hold nonstate and state actors accountable for human rights violations. The origins of this international norm of accountability and the various mechanisms states have designed and implemented to remedy past injustices are examined. GT/IPJ
  
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    PS 363 - Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict

    (3.00 cr.)

    Despite increasing global integration, identity-based conflicts persist throughout the world. This course provides an overview of the comparative study of nationalism and ethnic conflict, juxtaposing classic texts from the nationalism literature with contemporary cases to illustrate key themes. The course is divided into two complementary parts: theories of nationalism and explanations of nationalist conflict. Beginning with a theoretical exploration of the origins of national identity, the course addresses concepts including types of nationalism (ethnic, civic, revolutionary, and counter-revolutionary); aims and goals of nationalist movements (especially recognition, remedial policies, autonomy, and/or independence); nationalism and rationality; the ethnic security dilemma; democratization and nationalist conflict; colonial legacies; and structural solutions to violent nationalism, culminating in discussion on the future of nationalism in light of increasing global interconnectedness. GT/IPJ
  
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    PS 364 - International Relations through Non-Western Lenses

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students study global politics through the lenses of gender, race, and ethnicity. Suspending the traditional view of international relations as the study of how nation-states make war, this course emphasizes the processes by which gendered and racialized local communities act to challenge dominant cultures, ideologies, and institutions. Students are encouraged to question the role of their own social locations and identities in their interpretations of the world. GT/IG
  
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    PS 365 - International Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to the main arguments about the causes of war and peace in today's world. The course covers current debates over whether conflict will continue to occur among states; the role of human rights; and if globalization and trade will bring more cooperation to the world stage. GT
  
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    PS 366 - International Political Economy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students consider the evolution of the theory and practice of the interplay between politics and economics. They also gain an understanding of the competing arguments in current policy debates. GT
  
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    PS 368 - Entertainment, Media, and Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Today, entertainment media dominates our lives more than ever before. Content and platforms proliferate; people can listen to podcasts in the shower, watch YouTube clips while on the bus, and stream TV shows all night. This entertainment boom has occurred as democratic politics has become more fraught: U.S. electoral politics is dominated by partisan polarization and the rise of populist outsider candidates while Brexit is shaking the European Union. This course explores the relationship between these changes in entertainment media and democratic politics. How does the increasing proliferation of entertainment options and platforms shape political knowledge, civic engagement, and democratic citizenship? How is electoral politics affected by the rise of 'infotainment'? To what extent have television comedies and dramas shaped perceptions of crime and threat and helped drive changes in social attitudes about gender and sexuality? How accurate are fictional portrayals of politics on the big and small screen, and what do such portrayals teach the public about democracy? What does the future of entertainment and politics look like, and is it as dark as dystopian portrayals in pop culture might suggest? Same course as CM 368 
     
  
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    PS 369 - War

    (3.00 cr.)

    As aggressive instincts appear to be part of the human psyche, the drumbeat of war has echoed down the corridors of history. This team-taught course attempts to trace this phenomenon to its psychological and social roots, looks at the political and economic ramifications and the present-day configurations of war, its future and that of mankind. GT
  
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    PS 370 - Theories of International Relations

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the theoretical foundations of international relations as well as modern and postmodern critiques. Examines the works of Hobbes, Kant, Marx, Rousseau, and Rawls in their "international politics" forms. Also treats theories of eco-politics, "democratization," and transnational social movements.
  
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    PS 372 - Political Pathology: Terrorism

    (3.00 cr.)

    A broad-based examination of modern terrorism, inquiring into historical roots, cross-civilizational dimensions, internal rationales, personal motivations, underlying spiritual disorders, political ramifications, and future prospects.
  
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    PS 374 - Thinking Through Terrorism

    (3.00 cr.)

    A team-taught, interdisciplinary approach that seeks to examine the causes and effects of contemporary terrorism and to develop critical perspectives concerning on-going efforts to combat it. Special attention is given to the tension between the interests of public security and those of democratic values, civil liberties, and moral principles. Same course as PL 379 . IFS
  
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    PS 376 - International Law

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students examine the legal consequences of the fact that contemporary nation-states are creations of international law. This course explores who is subject to this law, how the law is created and enforced, and the relationship between international law and international politics. GT
  
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    PS 378 - First Critics and Defenders of Global Capitalism

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the issues surrounding "globalization," this course takes its bearings from the fierce debates over effects of increased global economic interdependence raised by dramatic social and economic changes of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The complex effects of these shifts upon stubbornly independent polities were analyzed with great clarity and foresight by thinkers such as Montesquieu, Rousseau, Hume, Smith, Jefferson, Tocqueville, and Weber, whose primary writings are considered. Contemporary assessments of the present-day effects of globalization are also utilized, drawn from works of history, economics, sociology, and political theory. GT
  
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    PS 379 - Studies in the Origins of War

    (3.00 cr.)

    A team-taught, interdisciplinary course designed to promote a dialogue between philosophical reflection and social scientific analysis in the treatment of a singularly important yet immensely complex problem: the origins of war. In the conduct of such a dialogue, philosophical theorizing is challenged in the confrontation with concrete actualities just as the plain "facts" of political history are stripped of their veneer of false obviousness, thereby opening the space for more essential questions. We hope students leave the course less inclined to demand simple answers and more imbued with the patience and humility demanded by the greatest questions. Readings include Homer, Thucydides, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Hegel, Clausewitz, Lenin, Nietzsche, and Freud.
  
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    PS 380 - Platonic Political Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Socrates and the founding of political philosophy; Thucydides and the crisis of the polis; the critique of Aristophanes; Plato's Apology, Crito, Gorgias, Republis, Theaetetus; subsequent contributions to the tradition by Cicero, Saint Augustine, Alfarabi, Saint Thomas More; Plato's modern enemies: Machiavelli and Mill. Same course as CL 380 .
  
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    PS 381 - Aristotelian Political Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    An investigation of the founding of political science by Aristotle devoted to a reading of Nicomachean Ethics and Politics, as well as selections from Aristotle's scientific and logical treatises. Subsequent contributions to the tradition are also considered, including those of Marsilius of Padua and Saint Thomas Aquinas. Aristotle's modern enemies: Hobbes and Marx. Same course as CL 381 .
  
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    PS 382 - Modern Political Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    An analysis of major works in political theory from the Italian Renaissance to the French Revolution, including readings from Machiavelli, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Special emphasis on modern conceptions of human nature, authority, and power, as well as the formative impact of the Enlightenment, Scientific Revolution, and Protestant Reformation.
  
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    PS 383 - Contemporary French Political Thought

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of current French political philosophy, including the writings of Claude Lefort, Raymond Aron, Pierre Manent, Philippe Beneton, and Chantal Delsol. The course focuses on some of the most penetrating students of contemporary liberal democracy.
  
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    PS 384 - American Political Thought

    (3.00 cr.)

    An investigation of the ideological origins of the American Revolution; principal writings of the founding period including those of Jefferson, John Adams, Hamilton, and Madison; Tocqueville's assessment of American democracy; Calhoun, Lincoln, Frederick Douglas, and the crisis of the house divided; contemporary currents in American political thought. IU
  
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    PS 385 - Democratic Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    A theoretical and historical examination of the structural advantages and limitations of democratic political systems, incorporating readings from the history of political philosophy and contemporary political science. Special emphasis on the tension between liberty and equality, the problem of democratic statesmanship, and the relationship between democracy and capitalism.
  
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    PS 386 - Marxist Political Thought

    (3.00 cr.)

    Origins of Marxist theory in Utopian Socialism and German Idealism; Marx's writings on human nature, historical development, political struggle, and economic relationships; subsequent developments in Marxist theory and practice in the Soviet, Chinese, and Third World contexts.
  
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    PS 387 - Marx after Marxism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Contemporary problems in the relation of polity and economy are explored by way of an intensive re-reading of Marx and several of his most insightful successors. By surveying the contemporary economic landscape through the lens of his work, students will judge how much of Marx is either vital or vitiated today.
  
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    PS 388 - Socratic Political Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Socrates, the first political philosopher, wrote nothing. His unique life and thought are known only through the writings of others-both friends and enemies. By reading works by Aristophanes, Plato, Xenophon, and Nietzsche, students seek to understand the Socratic way of life. The famous "Socratic turn" is examined-Socrates' move from natural philosophy toward political philosophy and the study of "the human things." Students also examine Socrates' quarrel with poets, the Sophists, and the political community itself. Was the Athenian democracy right to put Socrates to death? Finally, Socrates' relations with his friends and students are examined-how and what did he teach them. Same course as CL 388  .
  
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    PS 389 - African American Political Thought

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the writings of those African Americans who have reflected most profoundly on the American regime and their place in it, from the time of the nation's founding to the present. Authors include Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Shelby Steele. IAF/IU
  
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    PS 391 - Historicism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Perhaps no development has been so fateful for modern man as the philosophic discovery of History. No longer simply an adjunct of philosophic reasoning, History acquires a new primacy for those thinkers who seek an alternative to Nature or Providence. Examines the emergence of the historical consciousness, beginning with its first appearance in Rousseau and moving through its subsequent elaboration in nineteenth- and twentieth-century thinkers (Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, and Heidegger).
  
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    PS 392 - Sexual Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    While most courses in political philosophy are concerned with the nature of man (understood to mean the nature of humankind), this course is concerned with the nature of men and women-humankind in its bifurcated state. Students examine the classical treatment of sexual politics (in Plato and Aristophanes); the Bible's handling of the question; as well as modern and contemporary authors who deal with the ever vexed questions of the relation between nature and convention, family and state, public and private, men and women. IG
  
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    PS 395 - Bio-Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    An inquiry into the basic nature of Homo sapiens and how that nature helps shape politics. Particular attention to questions such as: Is man inherently good or bad? Aggressive? Rational? Destructive? Genetically determined? Able to survive another hundred years, given what we know about ourselves and our technology?
  
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    PS 396 - Politics of Eastern Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the politics, economics, and history of the region of east central Europe. Special attention to the collapse of communist party rule and its implications for state and society. GT
  
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    PS 397 - Politics of Western Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the politics, economics, and history of the region of western Europe. GT
  
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    PS 398 - Contemporary Italian Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the current political structure of Italy. Offered in Rome only.
  
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    PS 401 - Seminar: Research Methods in Political Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    Is political science really a science? Students read works on the underlying philosophy of science, as well as the nature of hypothesis, evidence, and theory in the social sciences. Research strategies and techniques that can serve students when writing papers, theses, pursuing graduate degrees, or in future careers are developed. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    PS 402 - Seminar: State-Society Relations in Contemporary China

    (3.00 cr.)

    Rapid and tumultuous economic changes during the reform era have led to more incremental, yet far-ranging transformation in China's social and religious sphere. Will these changes in state-society relations lead to civil society as in the West, and potentially democracy? Or, will China's hybrid relationship between state and society reinforce state power and prolong authoritarian rule? These questions are the core themes of this seminar. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    PS 404 - Seminar: Politics of Resistance in Contemporary China

    (3.00 cr.)

    China's historic economic growth since the early 1980s has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty and, at the same time, created huge discontent inside the country. What are the possibilities, limits, and future of collective contention in China today? Although the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is ruled by an authoritarian single party-state, citizens, farmers, students, workers, and others have devised multiple strategies to make their collective voices heard, often outside official channels of political participation. This course aims to get a sense of the rapidly emerging field of collective resistance in China by surveying recent scholarship on protestors of all types in the early twenty-first century. Whether China will face a large-scale revolution similar to the one that brought the CCP to power or whether it will repeatedly endure small-scale protests that act as "pressure valves" to release the frustration is an open question. GT (Fall only) (Even Years)
  
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    PS 410 - Seminar: Modern Constitutional Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    Allows students who have had an introduction to constitutional law to explore more deeply the theoretical foundations that animate contemporary constitutional doctrine. Focuses on discussion of some of the debates surrounding the fundamental premises underlying various constitutional issues, including the nature of and justification for judicial review, methods of constitutional interpretation, federalism, equal protection, and substantive due process. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU
  
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    PS 411 - The Legal Conservative Movement in the U.S.

    (3.00 cr.)

    Recommended Prerequisite: PS 338 , PS 339 . Examines the successes and failures of the legal conservative movement, at a time when the meaning of conservatism is changing dramatically in American politics. Special emphasis is placed on the changing meaning of ideology across time, and how social movements can use courts to further their ideological agendas. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. (Fall only) (Even Years)
  
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    PS 420 - Seminar: American Political Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the historical development of the American state by focusing on key moments of state-building in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. An emerging subfield in political science, American Political Development treats political institutions and practices as embedded in social and economic changes and as consequential for future political developments. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU
  
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    PS 426 - Conflict, Peace, and Reconciliation in the Balkans

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the themes of conflict, peace, and reconciliation, using Yugoslavia and its successor states (Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia) to illustrate how collective memory, history, and trauma can create conditions ripe for conflict and violence, and present special challenges to attaining peace. Although the course focuses regionally on the Balkans, other comparative cases are used to illustrate key themes and concepts. Students have the opportunity to write a research paper on a course-relevant topic of their choice. Seminar-style with an emphasis on student-driven discussion. GT (Fall only) (Even Years)
  
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    PS 468 - Seminar: Rousseau

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive study of the political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    PS 469 - Seminar: Montesquieu

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive study of the political philosophy of Montesquieu, with special emphasis on The Spirit of the Laws and The Persian Letters. Also considers the implications of Montesquieu's writings for liberalism and modernity, and their broader significance within the history of political philosophy. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    PS 470 - Seminar: Tocqueville

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive study of Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU
  
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    PS 471 - Seminar: The Politics of Spiritual Disorder

    (3.00 cr.)

    A theoretical and historical examination of the convergence of spiritual disorientation and political disorder. Readings focus on the doctrines and political activities of apocalyptic cults in the ancient world, millenarian sects in the Middle Ages, and the revolutionary communist and fascist parties in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students explore the extent to which patterns of continuity can be found among these groups, and offer presentations to the seminar based upon extensive research papers. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    PS 472 - Seminar: Warfare and Human Nature

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive examination of leading theories regarding the causes of war and of their implications for the mutability or immutability of organized combat between human groups. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT
  
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    PS 474 - Seminar: Eastern Europe between Nationalism and Democracy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on different ways of interpreting the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe in 1989. Explores the roles of nationalist and democratic politics in the establishment of new forms of governing in Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Romania, and former Yugoslavia. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    PS 476 - Intelligence, Secrecy, and Governmental Reform

    (3.00 cr.)

    This seminar examines the purposes and limitations of the U.S. intelligence community and explores the role of secrecy and covert action in a democratic regime. Special emphasis is placed upon opportunities and impediments to fundamental reforms in the intelligence community. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU
  
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    PS 477 - Intelligence and the Executive Branch

    (3.00 cr.)

    This seminar examines the unique relationship between the United States intelligence community and the president. Students explore the historical patterns of interaction between the White House and the intelligence community, with special emphasis on the use of intelligence, intelligence related activities, and covert action to achieve the president's national security goals. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU
  
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    PS 480 - Seminar: Poland and the Holocaust

    (3.00 cr.)

    While Nazi Germany initiated the Holocaust, Poland was the territory on which it was carried out. Almost half of the Jews killed in the Holocaust were Polish. This seminar focuses on the relationships between Catholic and Jewish citizens of Poland during the Nazi occupation and terror. Recent scholarship, memoirs, and films are used to understand the politics of the Holocaust in Poland, both in the past and today. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT
 

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