2016-2017 Graduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Dec 05, 2020  
2016-2017 Graduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Montessori Education

  
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    MO 633 - Creative Activities (Music, Art, Movement, and Drama)

    (3.00 cr.)

    To focus on developing potentialities as the basis for designing learning experiences in art, music, movement, drama, and literature. Students will research, design, and demonstrate appropriate materials and activities in each of these areas.
  
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    MO 634 - Foundation of the Montessori Method

    (3.00 cr.)

    To give a survey of the development of the young child in accordance with the psychology of Maria Montessori and the philosophy of the Montessori Method. Particular emphasis is given to children three to six years old.
  
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    MO 635 - Perceptual-Motor Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    To show by demonstration and lecture a group of activities known in Montessori education as Exercises for the Education of the Senses that are designed to lead the child to an intelligent and imaginative exploration of the world. Content includes identification of a child's process of classifying his/her world, problem solving, and critical thinking.
  
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    MO 636 - Teaching Strategies and Social Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    To research teacher-learner interaction, analyze planning techniques and learning environments, general classroom management, interpersonal relationships.
  
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    MO 637 - Psychology and Philosophy of the Montessori Method

    (2.00 cr.)

    Provides a study of child psychology and child development from a Montessori perspective, including an historical overview of Dr. Montessori's work which led to the development of Montessori pedagogy.
  
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    MO 638 - Child Growth and Development I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the psychological, physical, social, and cognitive development of children from conception through one year.
  
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    MO 639 - Child Growth and Development II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the psychological, physical, social, and cognitive development of children from one to three years of age.
  
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    MO 640 - Creating Healthy, Safe Environments for Infants

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on how to assist caregivers in creating environments which support optimal development in infants.
  
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    MO 641 - Creating Healthy, Safe Environments for Toddlers

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on how to assist caregivers in creating environments which support optimal development in toddlers.
  
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    MO 642 - Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Infants

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn the rationale for application of Montessori-based developmental materials for children from birth to one year.
  
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    MO 643 - Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Toddlers

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn the rationale for application of Montessori-based developmental materials for children from one to three years.
  
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    MO 644 - Working with Parents and Families of Young Children

    (1.00 cr.)

    Students are given guidelines for the implementation of effective parent education. They create and present sample programs for peer review.
  
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    MO 646 - Foundations of the Montessori Method

    (3.00 cr.)

    To give a survey of the development of the young child in accordance with the psychology of the child proposed by Dr. Maria Montessori. To give an overview of the principles underlying Montessori pedagogy. Particular emphasis is directed to children six to twelve years of age.
  
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    MO 647 - Montessori Classroom Methods

    (3.00 cr.)

    To communicate the principles of classroom management for six- to twelve-year-old children that are derived from the philosophical and pedagogical ideas of Dr. Montessori.
  
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    MO 648 - Laboratory: Using Montessori Materials

    (2.00 cr.)

    Provides the opportunity for the individual student to practice with the developmental and didactic materials. Students develop skill in handling the materials and in giving presentations and work through individual difficulties in technique and understanding.
  
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    MO 649 - Language Curriculum and Instruction for the Elementary Years

    (2.00 cr.)

    To show by demonstration and lecture the presentations for the development of spoken and written language, as well as the important functional aspects of grammar that are appropriate for children from six to twelve years of age.
  
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    MO 650 - Art Curriculum and Instruction for the Elementary Years

    (1.00 cr.)

    To show by demonstration and lecture the scope of expression opportunities through art appropriate for children between the ages of six to twelve.
  
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    MO 651 - Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction for the Elementary Years I

    (3.00 cr.)

    To show by demonstration and lecture presentations of arithmetic and geometry which provide the child with understanding of and proficiency with key ideas in mathematics.
  
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    MO 652 - Physical and Biological Science Curriculum and Instruction for the Elementary Years

    (2.00 cr.)

    This is a two-part course. Part I will show by demonstration and lecture the presentations of biology which are designed to give an understanding of the life on earth. Part II will show by demonstration and lecture the presentations of physical and political geography which are designed to give an understanding of the interdependencies of the earth and life upon it.
  
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    MO 653 - Social Studies Curriculum and Instruction for the Elementary Years

    (2.00 cr.)

    To show by demonstration and lecture the presentations of social studies, which give an understanding of the origins and development of the universe and of the human being's relationships to this development.
  
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    MO 654 - Music/Art Curriculum and Instruction for the Elementary Years

    (2.00 cr.)

    This is a two-part course. Part I will show by demonstration and lecture the scope of expression opportunities in music appropriate to children between the ages of six to twelve. Part II will show by demonstration and lecture the scope and importance of movement, nutrition, and physical exercise for the development of mind and body health of children between the ages of six to twelve.
  
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    MO 655 - Practicum I

    (3.00 cr.)

    To develop the skill of scientific observation through guided observational exercise and the observation of young children in a Montessori prepared environment.
  
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    MO 656 - Practicum II

    (3.00 cr.)

    To practice the various professional and personal skills which a Montessori teacher uses, working with a group of children under the supervision of a qualified Montessori teacher.
  
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    MO 657 - Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction for the Elementary Years II

    (2.00 cr.)

    Explores the links between arithmetic and geometry, and stresses the importance of problem solving. The use of computers is introduced as a support mechanism for the child's exploration of mathematics.

Pastoral Counseling

  
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    PC 608 - Theological Anthropology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Overarching and universal themes in religious experience and conversation are considered. Some of these themes are sin, suffering, freedom, conversion, salvation, and grace. The students' objective is to discover the relevance of these themes in their personal experience and the experiences of those with whom they work. Questions are explored that originate in the process of becoming a more fully aware and healthy person; for example: What is the nature of our theological experience? How does theology shape us as individuals? Does theology promote or inhibit human development and well-being? How do we reconcile our theology with the experience of suffering? The course content is designed to promote theological insight and challenges for theological discernment in the existential situation.
  
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    PC 625 - Loss and Bereavement

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 679 . Restricted to M.A. students. Combines didactic and experiential activities in a seminar-style class that deals with the human grief reaction to loss and coping with issues of bereavement, illness, and end-of-life concerns. Personal experiences and readings enhance content that includes the psychology of human grief; bereavement rituals and cultural diversity; supporting grieving people, both generally and clinically; and criteria for identifying the presence of complicated grief reactions. Students are encouraged to explore the bereavement process relative to their own lives by sharing in small groups, readings discussions, and personal writings.
  
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    PC 650 - Substance Abuse and Addictive Behaviors

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 676  (may be taken concurrently) or PC 679 . An overview of substance abuse and addictions with special emphasis on diagnosis and treatment of compulsive and addictive behaviors.
  
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    PC 653 - Statistics and Research Methods

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides an overview of the philosophy of science and how it applies to research in pastoral counseling. Presents a summary of both quantitative and qualitative research designs, as well as the relevant legal and ethical issues to conducting research. Covers basic univariate statistics-including z, t, and F tests-along with correlation and regression analyses, and examines how these techniques are appropriately applied.
  
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    PC 654 - Career Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on testing and data collection as a method of exploration of career choice and lifestyle, of sources of occupational and educational information, and of different approaches to career decision making. Candidates develop a statement of personal career and vocational direction. Includes ethical and legal issues, professional identification, and multicultural and social issues related to career.
  
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    PC 655 - Group Theory and Practice

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 675  and PC 676 ; or PC 679 . Didactic and practicum blended approach to the understanding of group theory, types of groups, group dynamics, methods, and facilitative skills. Includes ethical and legal issues as well as multicultural and social issues related to groups.
  
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    PC 661 - Clinical Case Supervision I: Practicum

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 650 , PC 670 , PC 674 , PC 675 , PC 676 , PC 678 , PC 726 , PC 778 , PC 808 . PC 778  may be taken concurrently. Thirty-seven and one-half hours per semester of clinical supervision in a small group. The student participates in a practicum experience under the supervision of a doctoral-level student. Written and oral presentations accompanied by audio and video recordings form the basis of the supervisory process. Focuses on the dynamics of the counseling relationship, diagnosis, treatment, and legal/ethical issues. A clinical training fee is charged. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    PC 662 - Clinical Case Supervision II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 661 , PC 778 . Thirty-seven and one-half hours per semester of clinical supervision in a small group. The student participates in internship experiences under the supervision of a doctoral-level student. Written and oral presentations accompanied by audio and video recordings form the basis of the supervisory process. Focuses on the dynamics of the counseling relationship, diagnosis, treatment, and legal/ethical issues. A clinical training fee is charged. (Spring/Summer)
  
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    PC 663 - Clinical Case Supervision III

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662 . A continuation of PC 662 . Additional supervision may be assigned based on faculty recommendation. A clinical training fee is charged.

    (Fall only)

  
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    PC 664 - Clinical Case Supervision IV

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 663   A continuation of PC 663 . Additional supervision may be assigned based on faculty recommendation. A clinical training fee is charged.

    (Spring only)

  
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    PC 665 - Contemporary Religious Perspectives

    (3.00 cr.)

    Investigates the foundational spiritual concerns lying at the heart of contemporary faith traditions and how our understanding of these might influence the process of counseling. Videos, guest lectures, and student presentations help to focus on the uniqueness of each faith tradition. Readings and lectures help to develop an intercultural and interpathic approach.
  
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    PC 667 - Clinical Case Supervision: Skill Building

    (3.00 cr.)

    For students required to build upon the clinical and professional skills developed in a clinical case supervision course. Written or electronic permission of the program director.
  
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    PC 670 - Introduction to Pastoral Counseling

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the professional identity, responsibilities, goals, and functions of clinical mental health counselors who are pastoral counselors. This includes the study of needs assessment; program development; consultation; healthcare and mental health trends; client advocacy; political, social, and cultural issues; and community resources. It also includes an integration of Jesuit values and community commitment as a pastoral counselor. Must be taken prior to PC 661 .
  
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    PC 673 - Crisis Intervention

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 679 . Restricted to M.A. students. Crisis intervention theory, skills, and techniques. Change, crises in different cultures, and the legal implications of crisis intervention are studied. Practice focuses on caregiver awareness and understanding. Not available to M.S. or M.S./Ph.D. students during the M.S. portion of their program.
  
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    PC 674 - Human Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    An overview of the major developmental theories throughout the life span, with an emphasis on evaluating theories as a way to understand human behavior. Aspects of emotional, cognitive, psychosocial, personality, and spiritual development are included. The models of such theorists as Freud, Erikson, Bandura, Ainsworth, Skinner, Piaget, Kohlberg, Fowler, and Gilligan are explored. In addition, an emphasis is placed on diversity and the impact of cultural context (e.g., ethnicity, age, gender) on human development. Must be taken prior to PC 661 .
  
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    PC 675 - Helping Relationships

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to clinical skills which are fundamental to the development and maintenance of the counseling relationship. An experiential class that covers such topics as active listening, being attuned to clients, and building empathy. In addition, focus is placed on the counseling interview and the balance between gathering information and fostering empathy. Finally, the ethical and diversity issues involved in counseling are considered, as well as counselor self-care. Overall, focus is placed on the counselor's development as a professional helper. A personal therapeutic experience is required for the writing of the major paper. Must be taken prior to PC 661 .
  
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    PC 676 - Counseling Theory and Practice

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introductory course which includes an overview of several theoretical approaches to counseling, a consideration of what is uniquely pastoral or spiritual in each theory, and professional trends including multicultural and ethical issues for each theory. Must be taken prior to PC 661 .
  
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    PC 678 - Psychopathology

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the major psychiatric diagnoses included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), with an overview of classification, diagnosis, and etiology of mental disorders most likely encountered in the practice of pastoral counseling. This also includes mental status exams, ethical and legal issues, professional identification, and multicultural and social justice issues related to this topic. The goal is for students to develop skills in gathering relevant information from interviews and/or other sources, and to diagnose mental disorders on the basis of current DSM-5 criteria. Must be taken prior to PC 661 .
  
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    PC 679 - Pastoral Helping Relationship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.A. students. Designed to enhance the students' self-understanding of the methods and motivations used by caregivers in helping relationships. Introduces M.A. students to basic counseling skills necessary for pastoral care situations. Such interviewing skills as attending, listening, reflecting feelings, and restating ideas are taught. Students are also introduced to the theological underpinnings of the helping relationship. Distinctions between counseling, caregiving, and spiritual direction are examined.
  
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    PC 681 - Family Counseling

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 675  and PC 676  ; or PC 679 . An overview of the family counseling field including major systems theories, stages of family therapy, and treatment strategies. Special focus on pastoral/spiritual issues.
  
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    PC 687 - Spiritual Direction

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 704 . Restricted to M.A. students. An introduction to the ministry of spiritual direction: the nature and focus of spiritual direction; preparation for and the role of the spiritual director; the relationship of spiritual direction to counseling; current issues in spiritual direction; and the formulation of a personal approach to spiritual direction. Lecture-discussion-case study format.
  
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    PC 689 - Psychological Testing and Assessment

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 653  or PC 753 . Focuses on the understanding of the individual through methodology of data collection, testing, and interpretation. An overview of the field of psychological testing: basic concepts, interest and personality inventories, and projective techniques. Reviews the use of the psychological report. The didactic experiential approach is the teaching method used. Includes ethical and legal issues as well as professional identification and orientation as related to this topic. Also discusses multicultural and social issues in relation to this subject. A lab fee is charged.
  
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    PC 690 - Professional Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 663 , PC 700 . Restricted to students who entered the program prior to summer 2016, and have not opted into the new curriculum. Faculty supervision and peer interaction are provided in the development of M.S. candidates' final projects, integrating the students' cumulative educational experience with their spiritual, theoretical, clinical, and personal perspectives. Last semester offered, Fall 2016. Pass/Fail
  
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    PC 694 - Special Topics in Pastoral Counseling

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    An opportunity for students to pursue topics of special interest in greater depth. Guidelines for submitting a proposal are available from the Pastoral Counseling Office. Guidelines for submitting a proposal are available from the Pastoral Counseling Office. The project requires the direction of a faculty member and the approval of the department chair.
  
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    PC 695 - Pastoral Care Professional Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 608  or PC 665 , PC 673 , PC 674 , PC 679 , PC 697 , PC 701 , PC 702 , PC 706  or PC 707  or PC 708  or PC 709 . Faculty supervision and peer interaction are provided in the development of M.A. candidate final projects which begin with a ministry situation that is then described, interpreted, and given a response. The project is the culmination of the student's educational experience and integrates the learning from previous courses while providing a foundation for future professional direction. Pass/Fail

    To be taken in the last semester.

  
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    PC 697 - Biblical Spirituality

    (3.00 cr.)

    Recommended Prerequisite: PC 702 . This course focuses on the events of biblical history to uncover the variety of ways in which God and humans relate to one another. After reviewing methods of biblical interpretation, students will examine key texts of the Hebrew and Christian Testaments to learn how these texts serve in a decisive way to reshape contemporary human life. They will practice reflecting upon scripture and learn how biblical spirituality impacts upon human experience and pastoral ministry.
  
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    PC 700 - Pastoral Integration Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 608 PC 662 , PC 665 . Prepares students to integrate psychology and spirituality in their own lives and work in pastoral counseling. Topics include unlearning; a central pastoral dimension; dragon riding lessons; turning the corner in the spiritual life; overcoming resistance to change; prayer and prayerfulness; theological reflection and discernment, treatment of abuse as a paradigm for conversion, and the working through phase of psychotherapy; grace, crisis, and faith. PC 690 may not be taken concurrently.
  
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    PC 701 - Spiritual and Pastoral Care

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 679 . A service-learning course that provides students with an experiential understanding of the field of pastoral care. Through readings and case studies, students are encouraged to develop pastoral care perspectives, ones which take into account psychological and theological resources. The service-learning component requires students to perform at least 25 hours of supervised pastoral service.
  
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    PC 702 - Theology of Ministry

    (3.00 cr.)

    Different models of ministry are explored and defined. Students are challenged to define their own methods of ministry on personal and practical or functional levels.
  
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    PC 703 - Group Spiritual Formation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to classical spiritual practices within a group setting. Students explore disciplines such as discernment of spirits, forgiveness, spiritual reading, contemplative prayer, and testimony. Group exercises allow students to practice these disciplines together and become acquainted with a format for spiritual formation in small groups. Students write a spiritual autobiography for the final paper.
  
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    PC 704 - Group Spiritual Guidance

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 703 . Provides students with an ecumenical overview of spiritual guidance from the perspectives of multiple Christian traditions. Students explore major streams of Christian spirituality and how each conceives of spiritual direction, pastoral care, and pastoral counseling. These topics are explored more deeply within a group setting. Students read and reflect upon classics of Christian spirituality and write a final paper discussing their own views of spiritual guidance and pastoral care.
  
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    PC 705 - Pastoral Care Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 608 , PC 625 , PC 665 , PC 673 , PC 674 , PC 679 PC 687  or PC 738, PC 697 , PC 701 , PC 702 , PC 703 , PC 704 , PC 706  or PC 707  or PC 709 . Students are prepared to integrate psychology and spirituality in their own lives and in the pastoral conversations of their particular pastoral care work. Topics related to discernment, self care, social justice and creative ministry are presented and discussed. In addition, this course provides a foundation for writing the Pastoral Care Professional Seminar paper. To be taken near the end of the program and prior to PC 695 .
  
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    PC 706 - Spiritual Direction Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 679 , PC 687 , PC 701 . Offers students the opportunity to integrate theoretical insights with the practical issues emerging in the practice of spiritual direction, while simultaneously refining their pastoral skills, vocational identities, and the art of theological reflection. The internship experience consists of onsite hours in a spiritual direction praxis determined by a placement setting located in an approved retreat or spiritual direction center, or with a designated collaborative institution. In addition, classroom hours at Loyola for supervision are required.
  
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    PC 707 - Chaplaincy Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 679 , PC 701 . Offers students the opportunity to integrate theoretical insights with the practical issues emerging in the chaplaincy ministry, while simultaneously refining their pastoral skills, vocational identities, and the art of theological reflection. The internship experience consists of on-site hours in a chaplaincy praxis determined by the placement setting. Classroom and supervision hours are required at the placement site and at Loyola. CPE units may be earned when the student is accepted into a placement setting with a designated collaborative institution.
  
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    PC 708 - Supervised Faith and Social Justice Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 679 , PC 701 , PC 741 . Offers students the opportunity to integrate theoretical insights with the practical issues emerging in ministries of faith and social justice, while simultaneously refining their pastoral skills, vocational identities, and the art of theological reflection. The internship experience consists of on-site hours in a justice praxis determined by a placement setting. Placements are chosen by the student in consultation with the academic advisor and may involve community organizing, advocacy, volunteer management, and congregation- or community based justice work. In addition, classroom hours at Loyola for supervision are required.
  
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    PC 709 - Supervised Ministry Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 679 , PC 701 . Offers students the opportunity to integrate theoretical insights with the practical issues emerging in applied ministry settings, while simultaneously refining their pastoral skills, vocational identities, and the art of theological reflection. The internship experience consists of on-site hours in a ministry praxis determined by the placement setting. Placement settings are chosen by the student in consultation with the academic advisor and may involve campus ministry, youth ministry, parish ministry, or other ministry work. In addition, classroom hours at Loyola for supervision are required.
  
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    PC 721 - Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Practice: Treatment Approaches and Spiritual Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662 . Provides an overview of the theoretical foundations of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and also introduces students to "third wave CBTs" such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and schema therapy. Students review CBT's causal assumptions, assessment methodologies, and intervention strategies, as well as religious and spiritually integrated CBT. Through classroom demonstrations and exercises, and case formulation and treatment plans, students practice and familiarize themselves with the applied issues that arise in cognitive-behavioral assessment and counseling interventions.
  
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    PC 725 - Loss and Bereavement

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662 . Restricted to M.S. students. Combines didactic and experiential activities in a seminar-style class that deals with the human grief reaction to loss and coping with issues of bereavement, illness, and end-of-life concerns. Personal experiences and readings enhance content that includes the psychology of human grief; bereavement rituals and cultural diversity; supporting grieving people, both generally and clinically; and criteria for identifying the presence of complicated grief reactions. Students are challenged to articulate the impact of counselor worldviews and the client's spiritual beliefs on the grieving process, and methods for evaluating counseling effectiveness. Students are also encouraged to explore the bereavement process relative to their own lives by sharing in small groups, readings discussions, and personal writings.
  
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    PC 726 - Diversity Issues in Counseling

    (3.00 cr.)

    Recommended Prerequisite: PC 675 . An introduction to diversity issues in counseling emphasizing the cultural, spiritual, religious, social, gender, sexual orientation, and community contributions to human development and mental health. Students explore and challenge their assumptions of their own diverse backgrounds and develop the knowledge and sensitivity to working with those from different backgrounds, attributes, and cultures. Must be taken prior to PC 661 .
  
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    PC 728 - Psychodynamic Theories: Treatment Approaches and Spiritual Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662 . Provides students with an advanced immersion in contemporary psychodynamic theory (Freud, Adler, and Jung) and practice with a spiritually-oriented emphasis. This course explores the theoretical developments of psychoanalytic thinking including affect regulation theory, and attachment theory in contemporary practice. The course also includes an exploration of spiritually oriented psychodynamic theory as related to clinical pastoral counseling. Discussion of theory is illustrated and integrated with clinical instruction in the rudiments of psychodynamic theory and its component skills, including mindfulness processes in psychodynamic clinical applications.
  
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    PC 730 - Child and Adolescent Theory and Practice: Treatment Approaches and Spiritual Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662 . Focuses on the cognitive, physical, spiritual, and psychosocial development of children and adolescents and the implications for spiritually oriented psychotherapy. This course also explores assessment, prevention, and intervention for the spiritual, emotional, behavioral, and academic concerns typically seen from age 7 through adolescence, including depression, loss and trauma, ADHD, and externalizing and acting out issues. A variety of approaches are taught, including specialized strategies for spiritually oriented child therapy, play therapy, adolescent therapy, parent counseling, and intervention with families and schools.
  
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    PC 732 - Spiritual and Theological Dimensions of Suffering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 679 . An overview of differing religious worldviews of human pain and suffering. These worldviews are examined in terms of their potential to support healing from physical and emotional suffering, as well as the ways that the worldviews may directly or inadvertently create barriers to healing. Students investigate in depth at least one major religious or spiritual worldview in terms of its implications for facilitating or inhibiting healing.
  
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    PC 741 - Foundations of Social Justice

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the philosophical, ethical, and theological foundations for social justice. Particular attention is placed upon Catholic social teachings and ethics. Students learn the ethical and theological imperatives for justice, such as those found in the gospels, toward the development of their personal, faith-based theo-ethic of justice. The course concludes by examining how such foundations influence applied ministry in particular contexts.
  
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    PC 742 - Transformational Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.A. students. Explores the role of leadership in efforts to transform thinking, communities, systems, and policies. Traditional approaches to leadership that focus on authoritative and commanding individuals are contrasted with newer models that attend to the complexities of today's justice issues. Students learn leadership models that recognize the need to work collaboratively to navigate relationships, structures, processes, and institutional dynamics. Particular attention is given to leadership in community organizing and nonprofit management.
  
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    PC 743 - Theologies and Ethics of Social Justice

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to religious social ethics, as well as moral and liberation theologies. This course helps students develop and refine their theo-ethic of justice and hone skills in social analysis and theological reflection. Students apply these skills to contemporary issues such as immigration, consumerism, globalization, and world poverty.
  
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    PC 744 - Class and Poverty: Scriptures, Theologies, and Praxis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to religious social ethics as well as moral and liberation theologies. This course builds upon PC 742  to help students refine and develop their theo-ethic of justice and hone skills in social analysis and theological reflection. Students apply these skills to contemporary issues such as immigration, consumerism, globalization, world poverty, etc.
  
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    PC 753 - Statistics I: Introduction to Univariate Statistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: College algebra or PC 653 . A survey of elementary techniques of parametric statistics through one-way ANOVA, and an introduction to nonparametric statistics. Basic correlation and regression topics are examined. An introduction to the use of SPSS computer software. An overview of the basic philosophy of science. An introductory course for M.S.-Ph.D. and Ph.D. students; other students enroll in PC 653 .
  
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    PC 754 - Statistics II: Multiple Regression

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 753  or written permission of the instructor.  Restricted to M.S.-Ph.D. and Ph.D. students (may be waived with written permission of the instructor). General considerations in regression analysis; hypothesis testing in regression; multiple, partial, and semi-partial correlations; confounding variables and interaction effects in regression; regression diagnostics; dummy variables; one-way ANCOVA; use of SPSS for regression analysis.
  
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    PC 755 - Statistics III: Multivariate Statistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 753 , PC 754 . Restricted to M.S.-Ph.D. and Ph.D. students (may be waived with written permission of the instructor). An introduction to multivariate statistics and analysis including MANOVA, principal components and factor analysis, discriminant analysis, and canonical correlation. Basic psychometric analyses for scales and their development are also covered. Students are expected to use SPSS to conduct analyses and write reports based on data sets that are provided.
  
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    PC 756 - Advanced Measurement Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 754 , PC 914 . Students are given more in-depth exposure to the concepts of reliability and validity as they pertain to the development and evaluation of assessment devices; assessment tools; theoretical and conceptual issues related to the evaluation of quantitative information; and hands-on experience in evaluating instruments.
  
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    PC 778 - Treatment of Psychopathology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 661  (may be taken concurrently). Students learn advanced skills in case conceptualization, differential diagnosis, and treatment strategies that are the foci of outpatient and inpatient intervention.
  
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    PC 790 - Integration Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 663 . Restricted to M.S. students. Challenges students to integrate psychology and spirituality as they articulate their way of being, understanding, and intervening as pastoral counselors. Students focus attention on their personal histories up until the present time, and how that has influenced an understanding of their way of being and theory of mind. Students are also challenged to explore a clinical population of interest, and discover the relevant research and produce a literature review on that clinical population. Additionally, students address issues associated with treating that clinical population from a pastoral counseling perspective. The primary assignment for the course is the production of a final project.
  
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    PC 800 - Adlerian Psychotherapy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 661 . Lecture and demonstrations covering the techniques, basic principles, and methods of Adler's individual psychology theory. Topics include lifestyle, assessment, social interest, goals, ordinal positioning, encouragement, and treatment.
  
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    PC 805 - Advanced Individual Supervision I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Consists of 15 hours each semester of individual supervision which may focus on one client to meet AAPC membership or several clients. Intensive process supervision with special attention to middle phase therapy issues. Weekly tapes are required. A supervisory fee is charged.
  
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    PC 806 - Advanced Individual Supervision II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 805 . A continuation of PC 805 . A supervisory fee is charged.
  
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    PC 808 - Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the ethical, legal, and professional issues faced by counselors in general, and pastoral counselors in particular. Specific topics include certification, licensure, and membership in professional organizations; confidentiality and privilege (including HIPAA privacy training); documentation and consultation; dual relationships and boundary issues; multicultural awareness; and many risk management and ethical issues that arise in counseling practice. Students become familiar with relevant ethical codes (especially those for the American Counseling Association and the American Association of Pastoral Counselors) and certain laws that govern the practice of counseling. Further, the course provides students with a framework for ethical decision making within the counseling context.

    Must be taken prior to PC 661 .

  
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    PC 821 - Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Practice: Treatment Approaches and Spiritual Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662 . Restricted to M.S./Ph.D. and Ph.D. students. Provides an overview of the theoretical foundations of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) and also introduces students to "third wave CBTs" such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and schema therapy. Students review CBT's causal assumptions, assessment methodologies, and intervention strategies, as well as religious and spiritually integrated CBT, and methods for evaluating counseling effectiveness. Through classroom demonstrations and exercises, case formulation and treatment plans, students practice and familiarize themselves with the applied issues that arise in cognitive-behavioral assessment and counseling interventions.
  
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    PC 825 - Loss and Bereavement

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662 . Restricted to M.S.-Ph.D. and Ph.D. students. Combines didactic and experiential activities in a seminar-style class that deals with the human grief reaction to loss and coping with issues of bereavement, illness, and end-of-life concerns. Personal experiences and readings enhance content that includes the psychology of human grief; bereavement rituals and cultural diversity; supporting grieving people, both generally and clinically; and criteria for identifying the presence of complicated grief reactions. Students are challenged to articulate the impact of counselor worldviews and the client's spiritual beliefs on the grieving process, and methods for evaluating counseling effectiveness. Students are also encouraged to explore the bereavement process relative to their own lives by sharing in small groups, readings discussions, and personal writings.
  
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    PC 828 - Psychodynamic Theories: Treatment Approaches and Spiritual Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662 . Restricted to M.S./Ph.D. and Ph.D. students. Provides students with an advanced immersion in contemporary psychodynamic theory (Freud, Adler, and Jung) and practice with a spiritually-oriented emphasis. This course explores the theoretical developments of psychoanalytic thinking including affect regulation theory, and attachment theory in contemporary practice. The course also includes an exploration of spiritually oriented psychodynamic theory as related to clinical pastoral counseling. Discussion of theory is illustrated and integrated with clinical instruction in the rudiments of psychodynamic theory and its component skills, including mindfulness processes in psychodynamic clinical applications and methods for evaluating counseling effectiveness.
  
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    PC 830 - Child and Adolescent Theory and Practice: Treatment Approaches and Spiritual Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662 . Restricted to M.S./Ph.D. and Ph.D. students. Focuses on the cognitive, physical, spiritual, and psychosocial development of children and adolescents and the implications for spiritually oriented psychotherapy. This course also explores assessment, prevention, and intervention for the spiritual, emotional, behavioral, and academic concerns typically seen from age 7 through adolescence, including depression, loss and trauma, ADHD, and externalizing and acting out issues. A variety of approaches are taught, including specialized strategies for spiritually oriented child therapy, play therapy, adolescent therapy, parent counseling, and intervention with families and schools and methods for evaluating counseling effectiveness.
  
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    PC 842 - Transformational Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to M.S.-Ph.D. and Ph.D. students. Explores the role of leadership in efforts to transform thinking, communities, systems, and policies. Traditional approaches to leadership that focus on authoritative and commanding individuals are contrasted with newer models that attend to the complexities of today's social change and justice issues. Students learn leadership and consulting models that recognize the need to work collaboratively to navigate relationships, structures, processes, and institutional dynamics. Particular attention is given to leadership in community organizing and nonprofit management, as well as consulting, program development, and evaluation in diverse organizations in counseling and related fields. Includes discussions of social change theory, multiculturalism, and advocacy action planning.
  
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    PC 856 - Structural Equation Modeling

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 754 , PC 914 . An introduction to structural equation modeling (SEM) covering data modeling and its utility in theory testing. Students learn the computer-based program LISREL for carrying out path and confirmatory analyses. Students apply concepts to research with spiritual and religious constructs. Strengths and weaknesses are addressed.
  
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    PC 873 - Crisis Intervention

    (3.00 cr.)

    Crisis intervention theory, skills, and techniques. Change, crises in different cultures, and the legal implications of crisis intervention are studied. Practice focuses on caregiver awareness and understanding.
  
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    PC 897 - Spiritual Themes in Counseling Practice and Integration

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the basic concepts that define the integration of spirituality into counseling; identifies and explores specific issues that arise within the therapeutic context; provides an overview of the research and practice of spiritual assessment in counseling; reviews examples of spiritual methods in counseling; and explores, through group presentations and class discussion, spiritual strategies in counseling. Students are encouraged to explore the integration of course concepts and class discussions into their pastoral identities and theoretical orientations.
  
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    PC 898 - Religious and Psychological Research

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 700 , PC 755 , PC 897 , PC 915 , PC 917 . An overview and summary of the empirical science of people's transcendence-seeking through religious and spiritual experience. Two goals include becoming familiar with the methods and topics that comprise the field known as the psychology of religion and spirituality, and reflecting on the conceptual underpinnings that a faith perspective brings to these topics while exploring the assumptive worlds and implications of these perspectives. Typical topics in the pastoral counseling domain include measuring religious experience; religious coping; forgiveness; hope; prosocial behavior; images of God and attachment; gratitude; meaning-making; and positive and negative aspects of religiosity. Students complete a limited review of the literature on a related topic to aid their integrative reflection.
  
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    PC 900 - Theory and Practice of Counselor Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 902  or written permission of the instructor. Students enter into a mentoring relationship with a Loyola faculty member who supervises and evaluates their development as educators through a practicum format. Students are directed by the faculty member in readings on the theory and practice of counselor education, while also serving as co-instructor in a selected course, videotaping lectures, grading work products, and evaluating students.
  
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    PC 901 - Doctoral Clinical Case Conference I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 662  or equivalent, PC 700 , PC 778 . Consists of weekly clinical case conferences in order to facilitate practicum and internship experiences in a small group (five to seven students) and focuses on assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Weekly presentations involving audio and videotaped counseling sessions, progress notes, and reflections on the supervisory process are presented by the student. Concentrates on the process of long-term psychotherapy. A clinical training fee is charged.
  
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    PC 902 - Doctoral Clinical Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 901 . A continuation of PC 901 . A clinical training fee is charged. (Spring only)
  
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    PC 905 - Doctoral Individual Supervision I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Consists of 15 hours each semester of individual supervision which focuses on one client or several clients. Intensive process supervision with special attention to middle phase therapeutic issues. Weekly tapes are required.
  
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    PC 906 - Doctoral Individual Supervision II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 905 . A continuation of PC 905 .
  
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    PC 907 - Doctoral Special Topics in Clinical Supervision

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 953 . An opportunity for students to pursue specialized study in clinical supervision. The project requires the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated twice for credit.
  
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    PC 908 - Doctoral Special Topics in Counselor Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 900 . An opportunity for students to pursue specialized study in counselor education. The project requires the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    PC 909 - Doctoral Special Topics in Research

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 755 , PC 915 , PC 917 , and written or electronic permission of the program director. An opportunity for students to pursue specialized study in an area pertaining to research. The project requires the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    PC 912 - Counselor Education Doctoral Teaching Internship

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 900  Practical experience in graduate level teaching under supervision. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    PC 914 - Quantitative Research Methods I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 755 . Restricted to M.S.-Ph.D. and Ph.D. students. An overview of the philosophy of science and its application to research. Focuses on quantitative research designs. Topics include constructing testable hypotheses, significance testing, randomization and sample selection, power, factorial designs, interactions, and quasi-experimentation. Issues of internal and external validity, generalization of research results, research ethics, scale development, and critical analysis of published research are addressed. Students are expected to develop a research proposal and to participate in data collection.
  
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    PC 915 - Quantitative Research Methods II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PC 914 . Restricted to M.S.-Ph.D. and Ph.D. students. A continuation of PC 914 . Students complete an independent research project, including data analysis, manuscript write-up, and scholarly conference presentation. The course focuses on advanced data management and statistical analysis, including both factorial and single-subjects designs. Psychometric theory and scale evaluation are also reviewed.
 

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