2022-2023 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Aug 11, 2022  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue

Theology


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Office: Humanities Center, Room 042c
Telephone: 410‑617‑2219
Website: www.loyola.edu/academics/theology

Chair: Rebekah Eklund, Associate Professor

Professors: Frederick C. Bauerschmidt; James J. Buckley (emeritus); John J. Conley, S.J.; Stephen E. Fowl; Brian F. Linnane (president emeritus), S.J.; Claire Mathews McGinnis; Nicole Reibe; Joseph S. Rossi, S.J.
Associate Professors: Daniel P. Castillo; Rebekah Eklund; John R. Kiess; Jill Snodgrass; Arthur M. Sutherland
Lecturers: Maiju Lehmijoki-Wetzel; Nicole Reibe; Steven Spahn, S.J.; John Zaleski

The practice of theology in a Catholic context requires study of the origins and uses of Jewish and Christian Scriptures, the history of Christianity (Eastern and Western, Catholic and Protestant), contemporary theologies, and theological ethics. It also requires studying the multiple relationships between theology and contemporary philosophies, religions, and cultures. Thus, all students take an introduction to theology aimed at learning to interpret the Bible, understand the history of Christianity, and become people who can respond intelligently, in thought and life, to the way these texts and traditions challenge (and are challenged by) our contemporary world.

Learning Aims

Students who complete Theology Matters (TH 201 ) will be able to:

  • Describe Christianity's basic story of creation and redemption in Christ as well as employ its basic vocabulary as found in Scripture. To achieve this, all TH 201  classes will cover material from the Pentateuch, the prophets, and the writings; they will also read at least one gospel and one letter from the New Testament.
  • Describe one or more key incidents in the historical development of Christian thought and practice. To achieve this, students will read at least one text from the Christian tradition, broadly conceived.
  • Relate Scripture and tradition to some aspects of contemporary Christianity's present manifestations. To achieve this, students will engage at least one contemporary work, though not necessarily a written text.
  • Encounter the diversity of the Christian tradition, especially as reflected by the values of the Society of Jesus. To achieve this, students will engage at least one non-Western theological work, or a theological work reflecting the experience and insight of a traditionally non-dominant group in the United States, or a work that aims at addressing systems of injustice.
  • Read and demonstrate their understanding of primary texts in Christian theology. To achieve this, students will get the majority of their exposure to Christian theology through reading primary texts, rather than textbooks.
  • Demonstrate their analytical and expressive skills in written form. To achieve this, students should complete at least fifteen pages of graded writing, which can take a variety of forms: research papers, analytical essays, in-class essay questions, journal entries, etc..

Students who complete the second theology core course will be able to:

  • Describe the basic contours of the sub-discipline of Theology (either biblical studies, the history of Christian thought, systematic theology, or ethics and culture) into which the particular subject matter of the course fits.
  • Relate the particular subject matter of the course to Christianity's basic story of creation and redemption as found in scripture and learned in TH 201 .
  • Relate the particular subject matter of the course to one or more key incidents in the historical development of Christian thought and practice, either those covered in the course itself or those covered in TH 201 .
  • Relate the particular subject matter of the course to historical or contemporary injustices and demonstrate how Christian theology and scripture calls for a more just response.
  • Read and demonstrate their understanding of primary texts in Christian theology.
  • Demonstrate their analytical and expressive skills in written form. To achieve this, students should complete at least fifteen pages of graded writing, which can take a variety of forms: research papers, analytical essays, in-class essay questions, journal entries, etc..

Students who complete a theology ethics core course will be able to:

  • Demonstrate familiarity with the sources of theological ethics, including the Bible, the Christian theological tradition, and the current teaching of the church.
  • Apply a range of theoretical approaches to questions regarding the moral life.
  • Relate different theoretical approaches to concrete issues and cases.
  • Demonstrate their analytical and expressive skills in written form. To achieve this, students should complete at least fifteen pages of graded writing, which can take a variety of forms: research papers, analytical essays, in-class essay questions, journal entries, etc..

Students who successfully complete the theology major will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the foundations for theological reflection, including the major events of the biblical narratives, the development of key practices and doctrines throughout history, and contemporary theological debates.
  • Demonstrate the skills necessary to read and analyze the Bible, as well as other theological texts from the ancient to the modern era.
  • Communicate theological ideas effectively in spoken and written form.
  • Respond intelligently in life and thought to the way these texts and traditions challenge (and are challenged by) our contemporary world, including other religions, cultures, and pressing moral issues.
  • Engage and critique contemporary and historic concerns about the intersection of power, privilege, and human dignity in light of Christian texts, convictions, and practices toward the promotion of justice.

 

Programs

    AcceleratedMajorInterdisciplinary OptionsMinor

    Courses

      Theology

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