2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Jan 20, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
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    HS 477 - Seminar: Legends in Medieval History

    (3.00 cr.)

    Perhaps no other era in history has produced as many enduring legends as the Middle Ages. Robin Hood, Arthur of Camelot, Count Dracula, Macbeth, Charlemagne, Joan of Arc, and innumerable saints all join dragons, witches, lycanthropes, and other fantastic beasts as major elements of medieval popular culture. Study of their historicity, legendary use, and effect on medieval society proves a valuable tool to understanding the intellectual history of medieval Europe. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. 
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IM
  
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    HS 478 - Global Histories of Sexuality

    (3.00 cr.)

    Can sex have a history? If so, what kind? This course takes a comparative and transnational perspective to the history of sexuality in pursuit of this question. It examines how societies from around the world and across time have regulated, constructed, and policed sexual behaviors and identities. The course asks how race, gender, class, and ability have inflected and shaped people's diverse sexualities and sexual experiences. In doing so, it showcases the ways that the history of sexuality reshapes our understanding of social, political, and cultural history more broadly. Topics vary by semester, but may include male homosexuality, lesbianism, (trans)gender identity and transsexuality, heterosexuality, sexual knowledge, regulation and policing, reproduction, sexual violence and crime, sex work and prostitution, queer and feminist politics, and health and medicine. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IG
  
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    HS 479 - Seminar: Masculinity and Honor in Modern Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    As part of the general evolution of gender studies, historians have come to realize that both male and female roles are not automatic or natural, but rather tend to be constructed by contemporary social forces. One particularly volatile or rather malleable aspect of such constructions is the notion of honor, which has substantially evolved over the last 500 years. Students examine the nature of this evolution and discusses the impact of the Renaissance, nationalism, capitalism, and liberalism on the definition of what it meant to have honor and how such rituals as knife-fighting, dueling, vendetta, and even nose-biting all served to identify and reinforce masculine behavior among classes and across centuries. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    HS 480 - Seminar: Cold War in Southern Africa

    (3.00 cr.)

    Analyzes U.S. policy toward Southern Africa from the end of World War II to the present. The overarching theme is the impact of Cold War competition between the United States and the Soviet Union on African decolonization and nation-building. Special emphasis placed on U.S. relations with Zaire (the Congo), Angola, Mozambique, Zimbabwe (Southern Rhodesia), Namibia, and South Africa. Key issues considered include conflict and compatibility between African nationalism and decolonization and U.S. economic, military, and strategic interests; continuity and change in U.S.-African policy; options and directions for the future. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IAF
  
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    HS 482 - Asian Studies Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the various traditions of Asia and relates them to present-day Asian life through reading, discussion, and research. Students write a final 15-20 page research paper on a topic of their choice in consultation with the instructor. Because the course also serves as the capstone seminar for the Asian Studies minor, it takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding modern Asia. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IA
  
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    HS 483 - Seminar: Soseki and Mishima: Mirrors of Modern Japan

    (3.00 cr.)

    Soseki (1867-1916) is generally regarded as the greatest novelist in Japan's modern history; Mishima (1925-1970) is recognized as one of the leading post-World War II writers. Using selected works of these authors, students focus on the authors' artistic methods and visions; reflection of the course of Japanese civilization in the twentieth century; and depiction of a culture caught in the tug-of-war between tradition and modernity. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. 
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IA
  
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    HS 484 - Seminar: The Chinese Revolution

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the social, cultural, political, and economic roots of four phases of the tumultuous twentieth-century Chinese revolution: the 1911 revolution establishing the Republic of China; the nationalist revolution of the 1920s; the Communist revolution of the 1940s; and the cultural revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IA
  
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    HS 487 - Seminar: Comparative Revolutions in Latin America

    (3.00 cr.)

    A comparison of twentieth-century revolutionary movements focusing on Argentina, Brazil, Columbia, Peru, Chile, Cuba, and Central America. Rural and urban guerilla movements, the development of narcoterrorism, and the role of the United States are examined. Themes include nationalism, state formation, imperialism, agrarian reform, leadership strategies, and citizenship. The goal of the course is for students to acquire a deeper understanding of the nature of exploitation and oppression in Latin America and the continuing struggles for social justice. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IL
  
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    HS 489 - Seminar: America in the Middle East

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the complex history of America's interaction with the Middle East, beginning with the first Barbary war fought in North Africa in 1801 and ending with the invasion of Iraq in 2003. Topics include Protestant Christian missionary activity; the American brand of orientalism; the United States' involvement in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; the Arabian Gulf; and the politics of oil and cultural encounters and exchanges. Students work with primary sources such as diplomatic documents and other official records, missionary reports, newspapers, memoirs, literature, art, and advertising. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. 
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT
  
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    HS 490 - Seminar: Environmental History in Latin America

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores how humans and the environment have interacted over time in the Americas from pre-Columbian populations to the recent past. The study of historical change in human-nature interactions reveals both how people have affected the environment and how nature has shaped human actions. Because of the wide range of research methods and topics it embraces, the burgeoning field of Environmental History is both compelling and challenging. This course examines diverse views of nature, ecological effects of shifting agricultural and consumption patterns, the impact of technological advances, political ecology, conservation, and environmental movements. In part, this course seeks to define what constitutes "Environmental History" and to determine if there is a coherent set of problems and issues that this emergent field addresses. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IES/IL
  
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    HS 491 - Seminar: Migration, Displacement, and Refugees: Middle East

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the history of migrants, refugees, and displaced peoples from, to, and within the modern Middle East, from the nineteenth century to the present. After an introduction to the geography, history, and cultures of the region, and after a session dedicated to definitions and to theoretical and methodological approaches in migration and refugee studies, this course focuses on select topics: nomads as displaced people in the late Ottoman empire; the genocide by forced migration of Ottoman Armenians; forced population transfers at the end of World War I; the dispossession and statelessness of the Kurds; the Syrian and Lebanese diaspora to North, Central, and South America; foreign migrants ("guest workers") and human trafficking in the Arab Gulf; and the plight of Iraqi and Syrian refugees since 2003 and 2011, respectively. Students dedicate the last two weeks of class to a thorough examination of the current Middle East refugee crisis in Europe and in the United States, and welcome guest speakers from the Baltimore refugee community. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IPJ
  
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    HS 496 - Environmental Studies Experience

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone experience in the environmental and sustainability studies minor, in which a student arranges an internship, independent study, or research experience with a faculty sponsor to engage in an in-depth exploration of a topic associated with environmental or sustainability issues. Written or electronic permission of a sponsoring faculty member and the environmental and sustainability studies director. Generally completed during the senior year.

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IES
  
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    HS 499 - Capstone Project in American Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    As the capstone experience for the American Studies minor, each student develops an independent research project, internship, or service-based project, to be advised by two professors from different departments and presented at an end-of-year American Studies Symposium. The project constitutes the culmination of the student's work in American Studies and provides an opportunity for the student to bring together the perspectives of two different disciplines on a research area of particular interest. A project proposal must be submitted to and approved by the American Studies committee prior to registration for either the fall or spring semesters of senior year. The project must contain both a research and a formal writing component (the equivalent of a 20-25 page research paper). Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IU

Honors Program

  
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    HN 201 - The Human Drama: The Ancient World

    (4.00 cr.)

    The first in the four-course, interdisciplinary exploration of human history, extending from the ancient to the modern world, which Honors Program students take in the freshman and sophomore years.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
  
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    HN 202 - The Human Drama: The Medieval World

    (4.00 cr.)

    The second in the four-course, interdisciplinary exploration of human history, extending from the ancient to the modern world, which Honors Program students take in the freshman and sophomore years.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IM/IC
  
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    HN 203 - The Human Drama: The Renaissance to Modernity

    (4.00 cr.)

    The third in a four-course, interdisciplinary exploration of human history, extending from the ancient to the modern world, which Honors Program students take in the freshman and sophomore years.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    HN 204 - The Human Drama: The Modern World

    (4.00 cr.)

    The fourth in a four-course, interdisciplinary exploration of human history, extending from the ancient to the modern world, which Honors Program students take in the freshman and sophomore years.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    HN 210 - Eloquentia Perfecta

    (3.00 cr.)

    A course in analytical thinking, writing, and speaking. Aimed at helping Honors students to become better readers, listeners, speakers, and writers, each section of the course focuses on a particular theme or topic. Students read texts pertinent to the section's theme or topic, analyze the arguments and rhetoric of those texts, produce their own analytical writing, and make oral presentations.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
  
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    HN 215 - Engaging Nature

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introductory science course which emphasizes close observation of the natural world, problem solving, and hypothesis development. It is designed to introduce students to science as a "way of knowing" and to the nature of scientific research and debate.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    HN 216 - Honors Science: Special Topics

    (3.00 cr.)

    An in-depth study of a topic in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, physics, or mathematics and statistics. Topic announced each time the course is offered. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

  
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    HN 217 - The Chemistry Within Us

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines biomedical research and experimental medicine using an interdisciplinary approach and focusing on four major themes: frontiers of medical research; diseases; drugs, and drug development; and food science. Students are provided an opportunity to reexamine biochemical ideas at great depth. Includes specific applications and examples ranging from modern drugs and the drug design process to the chemistry of food and smells, and from cancer biology to stem cell research. Fulfills the math/science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

  
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    HN 218 - Computational Thinking: Exploring Computing through Robotics

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the great ideas of computing through hands-on experiments with robotics. The course explores the nature and limits of computers; engages with the philosophical and social implications of intelligent machines; and asks what the science of computing can tell us about creativity, reasoning, and the human mind. Students gain experience developing logical thinking using a programming language to control small robots; conducting field studies to obtain data; storing and accessing data from a database using queries; and performing data analysis with spreadsheet formulas. Fulfills the math/science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors. Same course as CS 218 .

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

  
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    HN 219 - Grand Challenges and Nanotechnology

    (3.00 cr.)

    The scientific community has identified a number of "Grand Challenges" facing humankind. Solving these challenges will have a profound impact in a variety of areas, including health, the environment and sustainability, energy production and consumption, and economic development. This seminar examines the current ideas related to Grand Challenges, with review of relevant scientific principles in the context of these challenges. Special emphasis is placed on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and their potential impact on addressing the needs of and providing solutions to Grand Challenges. Fulfills the math/science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors.

    Prerequisite: HN 215 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to junior or senior Honors students.

  
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    HN 221 - Edgar Allan Poe, Sherlock Holmes, and the Evolution of Forensic Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of forensic science via historical and modern influences. This course explores intriguing fictional and real case studies ranging from Marie Roget (Mary Rogers), Jack the Ripper, Casey Anthony, and others to understand the roles of forensic science in criminal investigations, as well as the public fascination with death and the macabre. A series of hands-on activities and field trips are used to put unsolved murders into proper context. The course capstone includes investigation of real cold cases in which students provide their own fresh analyses of unsolved homicides. Fulfills the math/science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Interdisciplinary Studies: FO/IFS
  
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    HN 231 - Honors Seminar: Macroeconomic Principles

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces macroeconomic equilibrium, its impact on unemployment and inflation, and the effect of economic policy initiatives on that equilibrium. Students learn to predict the qualitative effect of changes in economic aggregates on each other and on GDP. Topics include the business cycle; national income and product accounting; equilibrium in the aggregate demand-aggregate supply model; the multiplier; the national debt; financial intermediaries; money and its creation; fiscal and monetary policy; comparative advantage and the gains from international trade; commercial policy; foreign exchange markets; and the balance of payments. Effects of international transactions are incorporated with each topic. Fulfills the social science core requirement for Honors students. Same course as EC 103 .

    Prerequisite: EC 102 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT
  
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    HN 232 - Honors Seminar: Introductory Psychology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Surveys the multifaceted aspects of both the science and practice of psychology. Biological, cognitive, and social bases of behavior and mental processes are explored, as are the key features and importance of critical thinking skills and solid psychological research. Fulfills the social science core requirement for Honors students. Same course as PY 101 .

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    HN 234 - Honors Seminar: Politics

    (3.00 cr.)

    The basic principles and problems of political science centered on the origin, powers, and limitations of the state, and the nature of the political process. Fulfills the social science core requirement for Honors students. Same course as PS 101 .

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    HN 237 - Honors Seminar: Societies and Institutions

    (3.00 cr.)

    A macrosociological view of major types of societies that have existed in the past or exist currently. Students are exposed to the major patterns, causes and consequences of social change in societies and institutions through comparative sociology. Fulfills the social sciences core requirement for Honors students. Same course as SC 102 .

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

  
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    HN 320 - Art and Intellectual History: Renaissance to Modern

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines canonical art works of the western tradition in the context of key intellectual and artistic developments through close reading of primary sources and the formal and iconographic readings of works of art. Fulfills the fine arts core requirement for Honors students. Closed to students who have taken AH 111 .

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

  
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    HN 321 - Introduction to Theatrical Production

    (3.00 cr.)

    A comprehensive, experiential course in theatrical production. Students engage in major areas of production (acting, directing, design), as well as playwriting, theatre criticism, and the staging of an original theatre piece. Includes attendance at theatre productions on campus and in the Baltimore/Washington area. (Theatre tickets cost approximately $50.) Fulfills fine arts core requirement for Honors students. Closed to students who have taken DR 251 . Same course as DR 252 .

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

  
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    HN 322 - Western Musical Traditions

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the major forms and styles in the western musical tradition, with an emphasis on guided listening of masterworks and the study of issues in musical aesthetics through scholarly and primary source texts. Aims to develop a more perceptive and informed listener and to introduce skills in music scholarship. Fulfills fine arts core requirement for Honors students, Class of 2018 and beyond. Closed to students who have taken MU 203 . Same course as MU 204 .

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

  
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    HN 323 - Photographic Vision: Tools, Techniques, and Theories

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students work with film and digital single lens reflex (SLR) cameras in the studio, darkroom, and computer lab. Students learn to use their cameras to craft thoughtful, intentional photographs and to enrich their understanding through careful readings of core texts of photographic theory and analysis of historical and contemporary photographs. Fulfills fine arts core requirement for Honors students. Closed to students who have taken PT 300 . Same course as PT 301 .

    Restrictions: Restricted to Honors students.

  
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    HN 499 - The Examined Life

    (3.00 cr.)

    Serves as a capstone for the Honors curriculum. It includes revisiting ethical concerns and issues raised in earlier Honors courses, rereading relevant texts, and introducing new texts and ethical issues when appropriate. Fulfills the Honors ethics course requirement.

    Restrictions: Restricted to senior Honors students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring

Information Systems

  
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    IS 251 - Data Analytics and Information Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students examine the strategic role of information systems in organizations and the integration of data analytics into business activities enabling quality, timeliness, and competitive advantage. They are immersed in the collection, exploration, visualization and application of data to make informed business decisions. Students apply database, spreadsheet, and visualization skills to solve real world business challenges. Recommended completion during sophomore year.

    Prerequisite: CS 105  or CS 111  or CS 115  or CS 117  or CS 118  or CS 151  or CS 201 or CS 218  or HN 218  or HN 318 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS/IDS
  
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    IS 352 - Applications Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to software development with an emphasis on real-world applications. Students are introduced to programming in a modern computer language such as Python or Java. Principles of program design, programming structures, data structures, program testing, and debugging are covered. Emphasis is placed on developing a business application such as a mobile app. No prior programming experience is required.

    Prerequisite: IS 251  or BH 251 ; IS 353 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to business administration majors with a concentration in information systems, or data science majors or minors, or students with written permission of the department chair.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
  
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    IS 353 - Data Management and Database Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students analyze, create a logical design, and implement the physical design for a relational database system. The course includes significant exposure to SQL (Structured Query Language) in both Microsoft Access and Oracle. Students will also be exposed to the challenges associated with managing large amounts of data. Recommended completion during sophomore year.

    Prerequisite: EC 220 , IS 251  or BH 251 , MA 151  or MA 251 ; or written permission of the department chair.
    Restrictions: Restricted to students with a concentration or minor in information systems or written permission of department chair.

    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS/IDS
  
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    IS 355 - Cyber Security and Networks

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the technologies underlying today's networking, multimedia, electronic business, and entertainment industries. This course balances technical and managerial content while covering a broad range of topics, including the strategic role of telecommunications, networking infrastructure, security, encryption, audio, video, intellectual property rights, and the history and politics of the telecommunications industries.

    Prerequisite: IS 353  or written permission of the department chair.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer
  
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    IS 356 - Information Technology for Financial Services

    (3.00 cr.)

    At a time when information is critical to corporate success, financial service firms continue to be the largest consumers of information technology (IT). The impact of IT across U.S. and European equities markets, brokerage companies, bond trading, and electronic banking is examined. Students gain a thorough understanding of how IT is used by financial services firms for competitive advantage. This course builds on the theory of equities markets by allowing students to engage in simulated stock market transactions and to apply financial theories in a practical, real-world setting.

    Prerequisite: FI 320  or BH 320 , IS 251  or BH 251 .
  
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    IS 358 - Business Intelligence and Data Mining

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to data mining as a technology to discover information and knowledge from large datasets for business decisions. Students utilize SAS Enterprise Miner™ to perform data mining using methods such as clustering, regression and decision trees. Students develop a real world project using leading business intelligence technology for data mining. Forms the foundation for customer relationship management in marketing and for forensic accounting. Required to be eligible for the SAS™ BI Certificate.

    Prerequisite: EC 220 , IS 251  or BH 251 ; MA 151  or MA 251 ; or written permission of the department chair.
    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): IS 353 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors.

    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS/FO/IDS/IFS
  
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    IS 360 - Management of Global Information Technology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Exposes students to the challenges of establishing a successful and globally competitive information technology (IT) industry. Students study historical, economic, political, labor, and social factors leading to the establishment of country-specific centers of IT excellence. In particular, students study what led multinational corporations to base their overseas activities within a specific location. Students are expected to attend a series of classes during the regular semester and to then travel to the international destination to meet with company executives and to tour company facilities. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: IS 251  or BH 251  or CS 301  or CS 312 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher.

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT
  
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    IS 362 - Enterprise Systems and Cloud Computing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students investigate large-scale application software packages and architectures that support information flows and data analytics in complex organizations. Modern enterprises must respond to advanced computing requirements to address areas such as strategic decision making, customer relationship management, big data, and scalability while managing resources. Students develop and manage projects using real world data with Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and Cloud Computing such as SAP, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform (GCP), Microsoft Azure, and IBM Cloud.

    Prerequisite: CS 485  or IS 353  or written permission of the department chair.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer
  
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    IS 452 - Special Topics in Information Systems

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Students explore information systems in a variety of formats and subject areas.

    Prerequisite: IS 251  or BH 251 .
  
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    IS 453 - Information Systems Analysis and Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prepares students to play a significant role in the development of information systems in organizations. Students learn to complete the phases of the systems development life cycle-feasibility, analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance-using structured tools and techniques, project management, and oral presentations. Topics also include the roles of systems analysts, designers, and programmers, as well as global and ethical concerns in systems development.

    Prerequisite: IS 353  or written permission of the department chair.
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
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    IS 458 - Web-Enabled Applications

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore and apply effective use of the technologies associated with responsive web applications and digital business including HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, Bootstrap, and jQuery, all essential to modern companies. In this capstone course, students integrate all of the previous information systems courses, develop a plan for an entrepreneurial business, and create a sophisticated web-enabled senior project.

    Prerequisite: IS 251  or BH 251 , IS 352 , IS 358 , and IS 453 ; or written permission of the department chair.
    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): IS 355 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    IS 459 - Research Project in Information Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students develop individual research in a specific area of mutual interest with a faculty member. The student must begin with a written plan for the project and conclude with a written research report. Written or electronic permission of the department chair.

    Restrictions: Restricted to senior business administration majors with a concentration in information systems.

  
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    IS 460 - Data Visualization

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students investigate human processing of information and appropriate representation of data in a visual form. Data come in many forms such as structured data in databases and unstructured data in social media and images. Some data are called semistructured and have characteristics of both types. This course focuses on presentation of data in visual form for humans using current techniques such as Tableau and Qlik.

    Prerequisite: CS 485  or IS 353 ; or written permission of the department chair.
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
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    IS 465 - Text Mining

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to mining textual data to discover information and knowledge embedded in formats such as social media and electronic text documents. Students utilize technologies such as SAS Enterprise Miner™ to perform text mining using methods such as clustering, regression, and decision trees. Students develop a project using current business intelligence technology for text mining.

    Prerequisite: CS 485  or IS 353 ; IS 358 ; or written permission of the department chair.
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
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    IS 499 - Internship in Information Systems

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Students participate in individual study and group preparation and reflection while working in a technology-related position for an enterprise. Students work with an executive or information systems professional, performing duties that are matched with Loyola coursework. Each internship is constructed by an information systems professor in conjunction with the on-site internship supervisor. Students work with the professor before engagement and at the end of the term.

    Prerequisite: IS 358  or written permission of the instructor.
    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): IS 352 , IS 353 , IS 453 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to seniors.


International Business

  
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    IB 282 - International Business

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the external environments that affect cross-boarder business transactions, including cultural, political, economic, and legal environment factors. Students learn to integrate international frameworks for trade, foreign investment, and foreign exchange transactions.

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IA
  
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    IB 415 - International Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Investigates business policy, strategy, structure, and process in an international context. Focuses on the international business environment and management practices outside the United States. Students develop an understanding of the complex and varied role of the general manager in a nondomestic environment. Topics include the international environment; the role of the general manager overseas; and global strategies, policies, and processes. Same course as MG 415 .

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , IB 282  or BH 282 , MG 201  or BH 201 . 
    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT
  
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    IB 470 - Special Topics in International Business

    (3.00 cr.)

    Readings and discussion in selected areas of international business. Past topics include emerging markets and international and comparative management. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , and 60 credits.
  
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    IB 473 - Global Strategic Alliances

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides students with a hands-on, experientially-based knowledge of the role, evolution, selection, and management of strategic alliances. Through readings, assignments and activities, students develop their capacities to use the vocabulary and understand the drivers of strategic alliances, understand the alliance life cycle and each of its major components, identify the critical aspects in managing strategic alliances, and conduct a comprehensive alliance partner selection analysis.

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , and 60 credits.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT
  
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    IB 499 - International Business Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    To augment classroom learning with practical field experience, internships are arranged in area companies and state, federal, or international organizations. Students must develop a research topic in conjunction with their instructor and the host institution. A "mentor" with the host organization helps students in the identification and completion of the research project which must be an international business topic. Periodically, students meet with the instructor in groups or individually. A minimum of 150 hours of internship in the host organization is required. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. A journal of activities and a final report are required.

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 .

Italian

  
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    IT 101 - Introductory Italian I

    (3.00 cr.)

    A thorough grounding in the four language skills: reading, understanding, writing, and speaking, as well as an understanding of the structure of the language and the literature and culture of the country. For students with no previous knowledge of the language. Cannot be taken for credit by students who have taken three years of Italian during high school. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    IT 102 - Introductory Italian II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of IT 101 . Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    IT 103 - Intermediate Italian I

    (3.00 cr.)

    A systematic consolidation and expansion of the four basic skills: reading, understanding, speaking, and writing. To increase and perfect students' acquired abilities/proficiencies in the language, and broaden their understanding of the country's culture and literature. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    IT 104 - Intermediate Italian II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone course reviewing and reinforcing language skills learned in IT 101-103 to help students attain intermediate level as defined by ACTFL guidelines in the five skills: reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, and culture of Italy and Italian-speaking areas. Course includes use of the language in context, with authentic readings, discussion in Italian, and film clips. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    IT 161 - Comprehensive Beginning Italian

    (6.00 cr.)

    A review course for students who have had three years of language study in high school and for students who wish to begin a second modern language. The material covered is essentially the same as for the IT 101-102 sequence, except that it is covered in one semester instead of two. This includes a thorough grounding in the five language skills: reading, listening, speaking, writing, and cultural knowledge, as well as an understanding of the structure of the language, cultures, and literatures of the countries that speak Italian. Special emphasis is placed on preparing students to begin work at the intermediate language level. Open to students who wish to begin study in a second modern language or who place into IT 102 . Contact time includes six 50-minute class sessions per week. Counts as two, three-credit courses. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required. Required for students who have completed three years of high school Italian, who wish to continue language study in Italian, and who place into IT 101 . Closed to students who have taken IT 101 , IT 102 , or the equivalent.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    IT 162 - Comprehensive Intermediate Italian

    (6.00 cr.)

    The material covered is essentially the same as for the IT 103-104 sequence, except that it is covered in one semester instead of two. It consists of a systematic consolidation and expansion of the four basic skills: reading, understanding, speaking, and writing. To increase and perfect students' acquired abilities/proficiencies in the language and broaden their understanding of the country's culture and literature, the second half is a capstone reviewing and reinforcing language skills to help students attain the intermediate level as defined by ACTFL guidelines in the five skills: reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, and culture of Italy and Italian-speaking areas. The course includes the use of the language in context-with authentic readings, discussion in Italian, and film clips. Counts as two three-credit courses. Contact time includes six 50-minute class sessions per week. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required. Closed to students who have taken IT 103 , IT 104 , or the equivalent.

    Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed IT 102  or IT 161  or placed into IT 103 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    IT 201 - Italian Composition and Conversation I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students develop their ability to write and speak correctly and creatively in Italian through models of advanced linguistic structural patterns, related grammar, examples of usage, and composition exercises. Oral practice enhanced through the use of videos.

    Prerequisite: IT 104  or IT 162 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 202 - The Living Language

    (3.00 cr.)

    A transition between language study on the lower-division level, where grammar and oral practice are stressed, to more advanced upper-division courses in which the language becomes the primary means of expression and communication. Special emphasis is put on the study of Italian immigration into the United States, considering different aspects with the help of Italian literature, history, movies, and personal narratives.

    Prerequisite:  IT 104  or IT 162  or IT 201 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II/IU
  
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    IT 205 - High Intermediate Italian: Meeting the Italian B2 Level

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuing study of Italian language, literature, and culture at the high-intermediate/low-advanced level. Materials include newpaper readings, films, literary works, composition, and interviews to review and expand students' knowledge in accordance with the vocabulary and format of the exam. At the end of the course, students should be ready to take the Italian CILS (Certificazione di Italiano come Lingua Straniera) exam at the B2 level offered each spring. This level is considered as recognizing an applicant's sustained ability to adequately converse in Italian and is the level from which one may apply for entrance to an Italian university without sitting the normally obligatory language assessment. Passing the exam results in a permanent certification. A fee is charged for the exam and is payable directly to the testing agency.

    Prerequisite: IT 104  or IT 162  or IT 201 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 210 - Italian Composition and Conversation II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Develops writing and speaking ability in Italian through models of style, related grammar, composition exercises, and the Internet. Comprehension and speaking are developed through the use of varied media.

    Prerequisite: IT 104  or IT 162 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 216 - Exploring the Text

    (3.00 cr.)

    A preparatory course for students who will take advanced literature and culture courses where narrative texts are analyzed in Italian. Students watch films, read plays, poems, short stories, and novels and learn to analyze their structures and themes. All texts are read in the original Italian and placed within their historical, literary, and cultural contexts. The concepts of genre, style, and periodization are also studied. Students learn to discuss literature, cinema, and cultural movements with the correct terms and vocabulary. They will improve their ability to read, write, speak, and analyze in Italian. Students also learn how to conduct secondary research, as well as organize and write a research paper. All lectures, assignments, and exams are in Italian. This course is a recommended prerequisite for all Italian courses at the 300-level and above.

    Prerequisite: IT 104  or IT 162  or IT 201 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 301 - Italian Literature and Civilization I: Origins to Reformation

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the historical, political, and artistic development of the Italian peninsula from the first appearance of the Italian language to the Reformation (circa 960-1600), based upon literature. Major authors and movements of the Middle Ages and Renaissance are included.

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II/IM
  
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    IT 302 - Italian Literature and Civilization II: Romanticism

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of IT 301 . A study of the historical, political, and artistic development of nineteenth century Italy—from the nationalistic movements to the first years of the country—based upon literary movements of the times. Courses need not be taken in order.

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 303 - Italian Literature and Civilization III: Realism

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of IT 302 . A study of the historical, political, and artistic development of Italy from the end of the nineteenth century to approximately 1950—from the first years of the country through the postwar years—based upon literary movements of the times. Courses need not be taken in order.

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 304 - Italian Literature and Civilization IV: Contemporary Italy

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of IT 301  and IT 303 . A study of the historical, political, and artistic developments in Italy since 1950, based upon literary and related movements of the times. Film of other genres may be included. Courses need not be taken in order.

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 310 - The Cinema of Italy

    (3.00 cr.)

    A comprehensive but selective overview and analysis of the landmarks of Italian cinema, predominantly from World War II onward. The course examines the ways in which Italian cinema reflects the evolution of modern Italy in terms of changing social, political, economic, and cultural developments which characterize twentieth-century Italian life. All lectures, assignments, and exams are in Italian.

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 312 - Advanced Grammar, Reading, and Composition

    (3.00 cr.)

    Expands students' ability to express and comprehend complex and nuanced concepts in reading, writing, and speaking. The study of grammar is in context at an advanced level. This course requires laboratory work outside of class in addition to reading, composition, and viewing videos.

    Prerequisite: IT 201  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 315 - Italian Society and Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    For students who have a knowledge of Italian sufficient to understand clear, standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc., and to deal with most situations likely to arise while traveling in Italy. Students explore modern Italian society and culture through readings, such as literary texts, articles, and reports concerned with contemporary problems. A variety of audio-visual materials are used to address fundamental facets of Italian mentality, culture, and social structures. Such materials include excerpts from radio and TV broadcasts, selections from podcasts and videos available online, and parts of movies and documentaries. By the end of the course students can produce clear, detailed text and conversation on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various concepts. All lectures, assignments, and exams are in Italian.

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    IT 333 - Topics in Italian Renaissance Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to a specific aspect of Italian Renaissance literature in its social, cultural and historical context. Taught in Italian. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II/IM
  
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    IT 352 - Dante's Divine Comedy

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of Dante's major opus. Focuses on the historical, political, and philosophical aspects of Dante's masterpiece. Appreciation of Dante's place in world literature. Closed to students who have taken ML 332 .

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/II/IM
  
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    IT 360 - Topics in Italian Theatre

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selected themes and/or periods in Italian theatre. Special attention is given to the philosophy and social history of the times and to critical theory of this genre. Topic announced each time the course is offered.

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II

Latin

  
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    LT 101 - Introductory Latin I

    (3.00 cr.)

    An enriched beginning course, intended for students with no previous knowledge of the language, which emphasizes grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and reading of easy passages from Latin authors. An introduction to the literature and culture of Rome.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    LT 102 - Introductory Latin II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of LT 101 .

    Prerequisite: LT 101  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    LT 103 - Intermediate Latin

    (3.00 cr.)

    Completion of Latin grammar and syntax.

    Prerequisite: LT 102  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    LT 104 - Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selected readings from authors of the golden age of Roman poetry (in particular) and prose. Analysis of styles/genres.

    Prerequisite: LT 103  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IM
  
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    LT 161 - Comprehensive Beginning Latin

    (6.00 cr.)

     

    An intensive course covering the material of LT 101  or LT 102 , or the first half of the Latin grammar sequence.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 200 - Latin Sight Reading

    (1.00 cr.)

    Reading of selected texts in Latin "at sight" or without preparation. May be repeated four times for credit. (Pass/Fail)

    Prerequisite: LT 101  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 300 - Latin Prose Composition

    (3.00 cr.)

    Exercises in the translation of sentences and connected passages into felicitous Latin prose. Development of knowledge of correct, idiomatic expression in written Latin.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 301 - Advanced Latin

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive reading of an author or genre of advanced Latin. When possible, choice of author or genre is based on student preference. May be repeated once for credit.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 308 - Vergil: Aeneid

    (3.00 cr.)

    A close examination of the masterpiece of literary epic, with emphasis on meter, language, style, characters, and themes. A reading of about six books of the poem in the original Latin.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II/IM
  
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    LT 310 - Roman Tragedy

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of selected plays of Seneca, with particular attention given to their literary precursors. Students study the language of the plays and also learn to appreciate them as pieces of living theater.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 311 - Cicero

    (3.00 cr.)

    A reading of selected passages from Cicero's letters, speeches, and philosophical works. In studying the life, career, and concerns of this eminent politician and social philosopher the class explores the events, personalities, and shifting values of the Romans in an age of revolution.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 315 - Tacitus and Suetonius

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selections from the chief writers of history and biography of the Roman Empire. Discussions focus on the history of the emperors from Augustus to Nero, the differences between history and biography, and the authors' selection and presentation of material.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 320 - Livy

    (3.00 cr.)

    A reading of select passages from Livy's monumental history of the rise and corruption of the Roman Empire. Focuses on the events described; ancient notions of history; and how Livy viewed the intersection of power, degeneration, human frailty, and wealth.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 325 - Cicero's Speeches

    (3.00 cr.)

    A reading of select orations of Cicero, with particular attention to rhetorical analysis as well as to historical, political, and social background.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 330 - Roman Historians

    (3.00 cr.)

    One of the major Roman historians will be read extensively, the others more briefly. Attention drawn to the literary style of each author and to the canons of Roman historical writing with special attention to the rhetorical traditions derived from the Hellenistic historiographers.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 333 - Sallust

    (3.00 cr.)

    A reading of the historical writings of Sallust with attention to his historical accuracy, his place in the development of Latin prose style and his description of the shortcomings of the Roman senatorial order.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 334 - Roman Lyric

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the development of lyric poetry in Rome with special attention to the lyrics of Catullus and Horace.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 340 - Roman Comedy

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of selected plays of Plautus and Terence, along with notice of their precursors, backgrounds, and some descendants. Students study the language of the plays and also learn to appreciate them as hilarious, artful, and living theatre.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 344 - Horace

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selected odes, satires, and epistles.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 350 - Readings in Medieval Latin I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selections from prose and poetry including the Vulgate Bible, Augustine, Saints' lives, hymns, and parodies. Students examine differences in content and language between classical and medieval Latin literature. Projects are based on the interests of individual students.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IM
  
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    LT 351 - Readings in Medieval Latin II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selections from medieval Latin prose and poetry. Comparison between classical and medieval styles. Readings vary with the instructor and with student interest.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IM
  
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    LT 354 - Petronius

    (3.00 cr.)

    Readings in one of ancient Rome's wildest and most extravagant authors and one of classical antiquity's few surviving novels. Students experience the seedy underbelly of Rome at its most decadent in the words of one of the Latin language's funniest and most brilliant prose stylists, while, among other delights, attending the most bizarre and hilarious banquet in literature. Werewolves, too.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 355 - Petronius and Apuleius

    (3.00 cr.)

    Close reading of sections of two underground classics, Petronius' Satyricon and Apuleius' Metamorphoses. Discussions focus on language, style, and subject matter along with the lure of the demimonde, sociocultural background, antihero, narrative technique, literary parody, and religious echoes.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 356 - Apuleius

    (3.00 cr.)

    Close reading of sections of Apuleius' underground classic Metamorphoses. Discussions focus on language, style, and subject matter along with the lure of the demimonde, sociocultural background, antihero, narrative technique, literary parody, and religious echoes.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 357 - Lucan

    (3.00 cr.)

    Close reading of selections from Lucan's Bellum Civile. Discussions focus on language, style, and subject matter as well as the relation between Lucan's work and other imperial Latin epics.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 360 - Independent Study: Latin

    (3.00 cr.)

    An independent study in Latin language and/or literature. Topics vary. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

 

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