2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Mar 05, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Philosophy

  
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    PL 370 - Medieval Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. The Middle Ages is a period which not only excels for its cultural richness-in architecture (e.g., the emergence of the Gothic cathedral), literature (e.g., the vibrant innovations in love poetry), and intellectual life (e.g., the rise of universities)-but also for its profound concern with regard to philosophical issues. The scholastic period (approximately c. 1300-1500) particularly stands out for its vigorous and engaged discussion of profound philosophical questions such as time and eternity, being and thinking, soul and intellect, language and truth. Due to the encounter and fusion of four philosophical traditions-the Greek, Arabic, Hebrew, and Latin philosophies-medieval thought turns out to be a unique cross-cultural enterprise whose impact contributed substantially to the formation of modern Western intellectual culture. IC/IM
  
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    PL 371 - Introduction to Descartes

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. An examination of the doctrines of René Descartes through the study of his works, The Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy with some reference to Rules for the Direction of the Mind and Passions of the Soul. Lectures address the centrality of Descartes's teaching to the modern program, mathematical certitude, the relation between reason and passion, philosophic method, metaphysical neutrality, and the project of "mastery and possession of nature."
  
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    PL 372 - Introduction to Spinoza

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A study of the foundations of the philosophic teaching of Baruch Spinoza, principally through the reading of his Tractatus Theologico-Politicus. An examination of revelation, miracles, divine and human law, philosophic communication, natural right, obedience, and the theologico-political problem.
  
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    PL 373 - Philosophy/The Enlightenment

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Studies the major questions of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century thinkers, such as Descartes, Voltaire, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Hume, Rousseau.
  
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    PL 374 - Philosophical and Theological Metaphysics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Explores the history of and contemporary disputes over metaphysics in philosophy and theology. What is the nature and task of metaphysics?  Why do some philosophers and theologians think metaphysics is essential to doing good philosophy and theology? Why do others disagree?  What do these questions have to do with the rest of life, and God? Same course as TH 361 .
  
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    PL 376 - Introduction to Kant

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. An introduction to the "critical" philosophy of the German Enlightenment thinker, Immanuel Kant. Selections from his three primary works, Critique of Pure Reason, Critique of Practical Reason, and Critique of Judgement are read to show the overarching nature of his critical philosophy. Focuses on key issues such as the meaning of transcendental, critique, and the Copernican Revolution, and how these impact on modern tendencies in science, as well as moral and aesthetic value theory.
  
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    PL 377 - Philosophy of Nature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Examines the changing view of nature from the period of the early modern philosophers of nature, Newton and Bacon, through the Cartesian mechanization of nature adopted and extended by Enlightenment scientists and its rejection by Goethe and Schelling, who defended an organic and holistic view of nature. The basic opposition between the idea of nature as no more than mere natural resources to be exploited for human profit and nature as both alive and the source of all life is shown to be indispensable for understanding contemporary approaches to environmental ethics as well as the looming threat of a global ecological crisis.
  
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    PL 379 - Thinking through Terrorism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A team-taught, interdisciplinary approach that seeks to examine the causes and effects of contemporary terrorism and to develop critical perspectives concerning on-going efforts to combat it. Special attention is given to the tension between the interests of public security and those of democratic values, civil liberties, and moral principles. Same course as PS 374 .
  
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    PL 380 - Marx and Marxism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A study of the philosophical writings of Marx and of the views on man and society presented by some contemporary Marxist authors.
  
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    PL 381 - German Idealism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. German idealism is the name usually given to the explosive series of developments in philosophy during the period immediately after Kant. Seldom in the history of philosophy has so brief a space of time produced so many philosophical innovations, many of which live on today, albeit under other names. Provides an introduction to the seminal role of Kant's thought as it influenced three of the most important thinkers of the time-Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel.
  
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    PL 382 - Existentialism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A study of some of the philosophical and literary works of thinkers such as Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Sartre, Marcel, and Camus.
  
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    PL 383 - Philosophies of Self-Perfection

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. There are compelling reasons to think that how we relate to ourselves, and the efforts we make to improve ourselves, are matters of moral significance. A wide range of topics on this theme are treated, including self-respect, self-deception, self-forgiveness, duties to oneself, and ideals of self-cultivation. Readings alternate between eighteenth- and nineteenth-century authors (e.g., Kant, Nietzsche, Emerson) and contemporary theorists (e.g., Cavell, Dillon, Darwall).
  
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    PL 384 - Phenomenology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. An introduction to phenomenology through a study of its major representatives, notably Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Sartre.
  
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    PL 385 - The Thought of Heidegger

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Traces the path of Heideggerian philosophy, focusing both on the existential, hermeneutic approach of Being and Time, as well as on the later, more meditative period. Questions will be raised about the implications of Heidegger's thinking for our understanding of the nature and history of philosophy.
  
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    PL 387 - Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Much of twentieth-century philosophy in the English-speaking world was dominated by analytic philosophy. Among its central tenets was the conviction that philosophical questions are best approached through careful "linguistic analysis." The writings of some of the most important representatives of this school of thought are examined, including Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, G. E. Moore, Ludwig Wittgenstein, A. J. Ayer, J. L. Austin, and John Searle.
  
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    PL 388 - Contemporary Continental Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A survey of some of the most influential figures in contemporary continental philosophy in an attempt to identify the key ideas that inform and unify their thought. Authors who may be read include Husserl, Sartre, Heidegger, Gadamer, Merleau-Ponty, Saussure, Derrida, Lacan, Foucault, and Levinas.
  
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    PL 389 - Nietzsche

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Nietzsche is the first major figure in the history of philosophy to repudiate the tradition of Western thought that began with Plato. The nature of this repudiation and Nietzsche's attempt to inaugurate a new mode of philosophical thinking are examined.
  
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    PL 390 - American Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A study of the evolution of American thought and language, from the "reflective primitivism" of the Puritans and the religious consciousness of Edwards and the transcendentalists, to the philosophical positions of American pragmatism, idealism, and naturalism. IU
  
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    PL 391 - Justice in Global Perspective

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Explores the foundations and content of justice beyond national borders. Do states-and their members-have duties to people living in other countries? What is the nature of such duties? Specific topics may include global economic injustice, cosmopolitanism, the moral relevance of political borders, environmental injustices, democracy and human rights, development, and war. IPJ
  
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    PL 392 - The Challenge of Genocide to Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Contemporary philosophers are now engaged in the multidisciplinary field of critical genocide studies. This course explores in depth the ways in which philosophical analysis might enrich our understanding of genocide and its causes, how philosophy might contribute to genocide prevention, and how philosophy might show paths to reconciliation in the wake of genocidal trauma.
  
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    PL 393 - Technology and the Crisis of Nature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Is the human use of technology rooted in a kind of thinking or way of being? Through a reading primarily of Martin Heidegger's work, students look at the dark side of technology and the devastating effects of human technical manipulation of the natural world.
  
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    PL 394 - Process Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A study of the basic principles of process philosophy through Whitehead's Process and Reality. Topics include actual entities and their formative principles, the phases of feeling, the concrescence of an actual entity, actual entities, nexus and societies, the theory of perception.
  
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    PL 395 - Advanced Topics in Buddhist Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Studies the basic teachings that are shared by Buddhist traditions throughout Asia, and focuses on certain key texts, figures, and schools of Buddhist philosophy. This course, also at times, compares Buddhist philosophy with Western philosophies and religions, and students' own ways of thinking and living. May be repeated once for credit with different topics. LEC
  
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    PL 396 - Classics of Asian Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Focuses on two or more classical texts in the history of Asian Philosophy. Similarities and differences between these texts are explored, along with their relation to Western thought. The course tries to place these texts in their cultural and historical context, and explores their relevance to contemporary society and personal experience. IA
  
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    PL 397 - Philosophy of Mind

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Philosophy of mind is concerned with the very nature of thinking: the functions of the intellect and its metaphysical status; the relation between mind and brain; the differentiation between reason, emotion, sense perception, and will. It has been a constant concern of philosophers since Plato and Aristotle, up until analytic philosophy.
  
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    PL 398 - Philosophy and Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Our culture has been reshaped by the new technologies of cinema and television. Examines a range of philosophical issues surrounding the audio-visual structure of these media, and their impact upon society. Also uses films, like written texts, as a medium for addressing significant issues in philosophy. IF
  
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    PL 399 - Anthropology of Slavery

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. The most frequently used argument against slavery is "slaves are human beings." The course turns this statement into a question: What does it mean to be human if slavery is or was possible? The phenomenon of slavery, therefore, is taken as a touchstone concerning the consistency of a philosophy of humanity. IAF/IPJ
  
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    PL 401 - Morals and Politics of the Lord of the Rings

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A thorough examination of the moral and political philosophy of Tolkien's masterpiece. Students are required to read the trilogy and are expected to be familiar with the film. Primarily, students read philosophical texts covering the themes of friendship, virtue, privilege, liberty, sovereignty, war, justice, rebellion, family, moral failure, commerce and industry, sacrifice, and love. IC
  
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    PL 403 - Philosophy of Happiness

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. What is happiness? How can we discover or create it within our lives? What are the factors-personal, social, and existential-that seem to assist or impede the quest for fulfillment? Classical and contemporary philosophical answers to such questions are explored, with some attention given to the findings of psychological research.
  
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    PL 404 - Reason, Science, and Faith in the Modern Age

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A philosophical-historical examination of the rise of science in the modern age (1500-present), and the impact this has had on religion, drawing from such thinkers as Luther, Pope John Paul II, Bacon, Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Hume, Kant, Darwin, and various contemporary scientific, religious, and philosophical works that have been important in informing the relationship between science and religion. IC
  
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    PL 405 - Aristotelian Ethics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. An examination of the ethical writings of Aristotle, with an emphasis on the Nicomachean Ethics. It then explores contemporary Aristotelian ethics in its religious (Alasdair MacIntyre) and secular (Martha Nussbaum) variants. Same course as CL 405 .
  
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    PL 406 - Philosophies of the Other

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Recent philosophy confronts a range of Others-the Other that I hate, that I love, that I fight, that I worship, even the Other that I am to myself. This course traces these very different modes of Otherness: social, sexual, political, religious, and metaphysical. Readings from Hegel, Levinas, Freud, de Beauvoir, Sartre, Marx, Lacan, Zizek, and Weil.
  
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    PL 407 - Marriage and Family through the Lens of Catholic Social Thought and Developmental Psychology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. An intensive exploration of major milestones of adulthood through the study of scholarship in developmental psychology and Catholic social thought. Topics may include sex and the body, fertility, marriage, parenting, sexual orientation, divorce, marital infidelity, and diverse family structures. IC (Fall only)
  
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    PL 408 - Contemporary Mysticism and Spirituality

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. A mystical world-view attentive to the unity of all things, the possibility of release from suffering, and an awakening to a "higher" plane of reality or to the richness of the natural world, have long been themes of ancient philosophies, both Eastern and Western. Such spiritual themes are also central to contemporary authors writing in both popular and explicitly philosophical ways. Students explore a series of such twentieth- and twenty-first-century texts, as well as their own beliefs and experiences.
  
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    PL 409 - Creating the World: Theories of Imagination

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Imagination has been variously conceived as a necessary aid to cognition (Aristotle), an "inferior kind of perceiving" (Berkeley), a "blind but indispensable function of the soul" (Kant), and "reason in its most exalted form" (Wordsworth). In this seminar, students investigate the history of the concept of imagination, with particular attention given to the philosophical significance of shifts in its characterization and its role in our contemporary self-understanding. Which kinds of human cognition are imaginative and in exactly what sense? How have our imaginative capacities been theorized in relation to reason and emotion? And, what roles do these capacities play in cognition, poetic practices, and moral agency? The very pursuit of answers to these questions requires intellectual imagination, as no single framework or method provides all of the resources needed to think expansively about the nature of the mind and its relationship to the world.
  
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    PL 410 - Metaphysics and the Meaning of Life

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. Fundamental queries-metaphysical questions-fascinate human beings: the existence of God, the nature of universals, the riddle of identity, the fact of mortality, the immortality of the soul, the enigma of time. This course examines such "perennial" questions through an historical survey of philosophical thinking and seeks to revive those questions for today.
  
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    PL 411 - Philosophy of Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL 200-level course. What defines culture? Where do we start in thinking about cultural difference? A wider discussion of the meaning of culture eventually alights on discussion of the 'American dream'-the major paradigm for cultural self-definition in the United States. Is the American cultural binder a dream or an illusion? The solidity, utility, and morality of the American dream is challenged by setting it against competing paradigms. Students should be prepared to encounter a very critical look at American culture through the eyes of some modern and contemporary critics of cultural norms. Possible authors for study include Nietzsche, Marx, Goldman, Gadamer, Adorno, Horkheimer, Chomsky, Baudrillard, Fussell, Zinn, and Berry.
  
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    PL 417 - Beginning and End of Life

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201 , one additional PL 200-level course, and PY 101 . Concerns two of today's most controversial issues: abortion and euthanasia. How are we to think about killing at the beginning and end of life? The course is unique in bringing together theological and philosophical arguments with psychological theories and empirical findings. What is the mindset of people who want assistance with their suicide or expectant parents facing a crisis pregnancy? What are the feelings and thoughts of the medical staff involved? What has theology and philosophy to say about guilt and suffering, and what are the arguments governing who can be killed, when, and by whom? The course is team-taught by professors from the Departments of Psychology and Philosophy, and students learn how to integrate their knowledge of psychological research methods with the theological and philosophical reasoning of Catholic social thought. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IC

Photography

  
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    PT 270 - Basic Digital Photography

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students acquire an understanding of and appreciation for both the technical and aesthetic aspects of reading and making photographs. Among the numerous techniques explored are lighting composition, and image enhancement and output. Students are expected to supply a digital camera with the ability to control aperture and shutter speed. Fulfills fine arts core requirement. IFS
  
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    PT 278 - History of Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the evolution of film from the development of silent films through contemporary works. Major directors and movements are investigated. Same course as DR 278 . IF
  
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    PT 279 - Silent Cinema

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the exciting, early technical and aesthetic evolution that laid the conceptual and formal groundwork for modern filmmaking. Students develop an historical and critical appreciation of film based on still photography, early attempts at making images move, contemporary aesthetic movements and the bold innovations of Edison, Chaplin, Griffith, and others. Students deconstruct early silent films, and make connections with modern feature films. Same course as DR 279 . IF/IU
  
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    PT 280 - Classic Hollywood Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    A course dedicated to the golden age of Hollywood. From the silent era to the advent of sound and color, this class examines some of the great films of the 1920s to through the 1950s. Among the topics discussed are the roles of directors, costumers, cameramen, lighting directors, and actors. Same course as DR 280 . IF/IU
  
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    PT 281 - Films of Alfred Hitchcock

    (3.00 cr.)

    Alfred Hitchcock was known as the "Master of Suspense." From Rebecca to Psycho, this cinematic giant gave us some of our most treasured films. Students explore what makes Hitchcock-Hitchcock-the director's extraordinary ability to manipulate an audience, his patent conventions, camera angles, and running themes. Same course as DR 281 . IF
  
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    PT 300 - Photocraft

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or written permission of the instructor. An intermediate, technical introduction to photography concentrating on the fundamentals of imagemaking, editing, and presentation in both silver and digital processes. Students gain a wide range of technical skills and experiences in both the darkroom and digital labs, focusing on in-camera exposure techniques, analog/digital printing, and project-based work. A basic introduction to the Zone System, studio lighting, and image presentation is also provided. Students are expected to supply a digital SLR camera (with full manual controls). A film SLR camera is recommended.
  
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    PT 301 - Photographic Vision: Tools, Techniques, and Theories

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students work with film and digital single lens reflex (SLR) cameras in the studio, darkroom, and computer labs. Students learn to use their cameras to craft thoughtful, intentional photographs and to enrich their understanding through careful readings of core texts of photographic theory and analysis of historic and contemporary photographs. Fulfills core requirement. Closed to students who have taken PT 300 . Same course as HN 323 .
  
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    PT 319 - History of Photography

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the major technical and aesthetic movements in the history of photography since its invention. Covers the works of major artists working in this medium as well as the major styles. Students in this class will not be expected to produce photographs. Same course as AH 319 .
  
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    PT 353 - Book Arts and Artists' Books

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor. Students are introduced to the materials, techniques, concepts, and equipment used in the craft of making traditional and nontraditional books. They learn folding, stitching, enclosing, and binding methods while creating three-dimensional works that literally or metaphorically reference the structure of books and address contemporary ideas about visual content. Same course as CM 349 /SA 353 .
  
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    PT 360 - Digital Mixed Media

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or SA 224 . A combination studio and digital photography course in which the computer is used as a tool and an integral part of the creative process, but work is achieved through mixed media studio methods. Two- and three-dimensional projects may include installation and/or virtual works that exist only on the Internet. Some prior computer experience recommended. Same course as SA 360 .
  
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    PT 361 - Digital Image

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Examines the ways in which the computer and various software programs can be used to modify and enhance an image as a visual statement for artistic and photojournalistic use. Students are expected to supply a digital SLR camera (with full manual controls). Same course as SA 361 . IFS
  
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    PT 362 - Advanced Digital Imaging

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Students closely examine preproduction camera controls such as multiple exposure, compression formats, and camera raw and the postproduction tools of Adobe Photoshop. The aesthetics and ethics of digital imaging are studied in depth.
  
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    PT 364 - Contemporary Digital Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 322  or SA 224  or written permission of the instructor. Students gain an understanding of contemporary artists who use a combination of digital and traditional tools to create artworks, while also developing their own art practice. Video, animation, sound, web-based artwork, interactivity, installation, and other media practices are addressed. Same course as CM 364  / SA 364 . (Fall/Spring)
  
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    PT 375 - Silver Processes

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. An intermediate study of black and white silver photography. Students produce their own darkroom work. Exposure, development, and printing are explored in detail in the darkroom. Students are expected to furnish a 35-millimeter film SLR camera.
  
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    PT 376 - Directed Workshop

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  written permission of the instructor. Designed to allow students to pursue an interest in a specific area of photography such as sports, portraits, landscape, nature, etc. Weekly critiques of ongoing projects and a final exhibition portfolio required. May be repeated twice for credit.
  
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    PT 377 - Landscape and Nature Photography

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. An intensive workshop in photographing the landscape and elements from it as an expression of personal statement. Some weekend field trips required. IES
  
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    PT 378 - Alternative Photographic Processes

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. A study of the early processes by which photographic images were recorded and displayed. Students make their own pinhole cameras and light sensitive materials, and produce original photographs. Explores the aesthetic and expressive possibilities of alternative photographic processes, including cyanotype, Van Dyke brown, and wet-plate collodion.
  
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    PT 379 - Color Photography

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Students study the history and production of color photographic processes, both analog and digital. Students explore making color photographs using digital cameras. Color theory, history and practice are studied through numerous readings and image analyses.
  
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    PT 380 - Studio Lighting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Aims at expanding students' visual awareness and their ability to create fine art imagery through the controlled use of studio lighting. Students work in analog or digital as they explore a variety of light sources from natural light, to hot lights, to professional strobe lights in a studio environment.
  
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    PT 381 - Photojournalism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Photography in print media as illustration and narrative vehicle: the photo-essay and photodocumentary. Basic graphics in print journalism.
  
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    PT 383 - The Photographic Essay

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Under the instructor's direction, students develop a body of photographic images exploring, in depth, a specific photographic subject. Frequent classroom critiques of the ongoing project, technical demonstrations, and museum/gallery visits.
  
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    PT 386 - Video Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. An examination of the aesthetics and history of video art, as well as a study of the techniques of video production. Students produce numerous short and long video works. IF
  
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    PT 391 - Image and Text

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Explores the dynamic relationship between photographic imagery and text. Students study the history of art that combines text and visual imagery. They also explore in their own work the ways that text as an interactive, subversive, or antithetical element can conspire with the photographic image to construct or deconstruct opinions and provoke new responses.
  
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    PT 393 - Portraiture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Recommended Prerequisite: PT 380 . Provides a basic foundation for students interested in portraiture. By examining the evolving roles of the photographer and the person being photographed, students are acquainted with contemporary trends in portraiture. Students work on projects that explore different ways of making portraits. Instruction includes slide presentations on the history and aesthetics of portrait photography.
  
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    PT 394 - The Human Subject

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Throughout history the human image has been the most important subject through which artists have expressed their personal visions. Students have an opportunity, through the use of lighting and composition, to study the human form as an artistic, photographic subject. Students considering enrollment in this course are strongly encouraged to register for The Nude in Art (AH 301) prior to, or along with, this course.
  
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    PT 395 - Moving Pictures, Still Pictures

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. Concentrates on the historical and aesthetic relationships that are present throughout the histories of both media. Movie clips, slides, and still photographs are shown and discussed. Assignments focus on narrative, passage of time, point of view, dramatic artifice, and stylistic and formal aspects of cinematography and still photography.
  
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    PT 400 - Professional Practices for Artists

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to the working world of the professional artist. Students begin to create a cohesive body of work that is critiqued throughout the semester. They learn to frame artwork, enter at least one exhibition, and attend at least one off-campus opening. At the end of the semester, they will have produced a CD of their best work, along with accompanying professional materials. recommended for visual arts minors. Normally taken in the fall semester of the senior year. Required for all visual arts majors who are not enrolled in PT 412 ; Same course as SA 400 .
  
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    PT 403 - Advanced Photography

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor. An intensive study of advanced black and white techniques in the studio, darkroom, and on location. Emphasizes final print quality, technically and aesthetically.
  
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    PT 412 - Senior Project in Photography

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Seniors. Students develop an advanced project under the direction of a faculty member. Work on the project continues throughout both semesters of the student's senior year. Written or electronic permission of the department. Proposals for senior projects must be approved by the fine arts faculty during the spring semester of the student's junior year.

Physics

  
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    PH 005 - Electronics and Shop Techniques

    (1.00 cr.)

    Knowledge of electronic construction techniques and precision machine tools is essential for an experimental scientist. In this course, students learn techniques to construct a finished electronics project. In addition, through demonstrations and hands-on experience, they learn how to use equipment in the wood and machine shop in order to fabricate specialized setups for use in a scientific environment. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    PH 101 - Introductory Physics I with Lab

    (4.00 cr.)

    A non-calculus-based introduction to physics. Fundamental concepts of classical physics including mechanics, fluids, heat, and thermodynamics. Lab component introduces basic principles of experimentation, error analysis, and report writing. Fulfills one math/science core requirement. (Fall only)
  
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    PH 102 - Introductory Physics II with Lab

    (4.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 101 . A continuation of PH 101  which includes wave motion, sound, electrostatic and electromagnetic fields, DC and AC circuits, geometric and physical optics, and selected topics in atomic and nuclear physics. Lab component introduces basic principles of experimentation, error analysis, and report writing. Fulfills one math/science core requirement. (Spring only)
  
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    PH 116 - Integrated Science I

    (4.00 cr.)

    Restricted to elementary education majors. An interdisciplinary presentation of the sciences, focusing on unifying concepts and real-life examples from physics, chemistry, biology, earth science, and astronomy. A particular focus is placed on areas where these traditional disciplines overlap. Hands-on activities and inquiry-based learning methods are used extensively to help in the development of a conceptual understanding of the material. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    PH 117 - Integrated Science II

    (4.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 116 . Restricted to elementary education majors. A continuation of PH 116 . Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    PH 120 - Introduction to the Universe

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of the history of astronomy and the current state of this science. A look at the probabilities of, and search for, extraterrestrial life. A study of our solar system, stars and their evolution, our galaxy and other galaxies, supernovas, pulsars, black holes, quasars. Fulfills one math/science core requirement. Closed to students who have taken PH 140  or PH 141 .
  
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    PH 140 - Structure of the Solar System

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of the theories of the solar system starting with Pythagoras and Ptolemy and extending through Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, and Einstein. Explores the modern space program and what it has revealed about our planetary environment. Fulfills one math/science core requirement. Closed to students who have taken PH 120  or PH 141 .
  
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    PH 141 - The Stellar Universe

    (3.00 cr.)

    The life of stars is discussed: how they are born, how they mature, how they die-sometimes with a bang and sometimes with a whimper. Pulsars, quasars, and black holes. Galaxies, cluster of galaxies. Cosmology, or how the universe began, if it did, and how it will end, if it will. Fulfills one math/science core requirement. Closed to students who have taken PH 120  or PH 140 .
  
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    PH 150 - Energy and Environment

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of energy sources for the future: nuclear power, breeder reactors, gasoline substitutes, the future of coal, solar and geothermal sources are studied in view of the laws of thermodynamics. Studies the impact of energy use on resource conservation, water resources, air quality, waste disposal, land use. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    PH 155 - The Making of the Atomic Bomb

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of scientific discoveries that lead to the creation of the atomic bomb. Topics include atomic and nuclear structure, relativity, electromagnetic and nuclear forces, and early quantum mechanics. Also considers political and ethical implications of nuclear weapons. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    PH 160 - Light and Color

    (3.00 cr.)

    Light and its behavior influences our perception of the world around us. Reflection, refraction, polarization, diffraction and interference are investigated, as well as optical instruments, vision and the phenomena of color. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    PH 165 - How Things Work

    (3.00 cr.)

    Demystifies the working of everyday objects such as compact disc players, microwave ovens, lasers, computers, roller coasters, rockets, light bulbs, automobiles, clocks, and copy machines. Focus is on the principles of operation of these objects as well as their histories and relationships to one another. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    PH 170 - Music and Sound

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the physical basis of sound in general and of music in particular. The nature of sound as a wave in air is treated first, and the physical quantities which correspond to pitch, volume, and timbre are examined. Topics include sound production in wind, stringed, and electronic instruments; underlying basis of harmony, dissonance and scales; and the human auditory detection system. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    PH 185 - Nature of Scientific Inquiry

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the central theories and paradigms of modern science and the methodology by which these results came to be accepted. Includes historical narratives of scientific discoveries, comparisons of science with other forms of inquiry, major transdisciplinary ideas in the sciences, and characteristics of a scientific approach to the world. Fulfills one math/science core requirement.
  
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    PH 200 - Opportunities in STEM

    (1.00 cr.)

    The colloquium focuses on internships, research, and career options available to students in Computer Science, Physics, Mathematics, and Statistics (CPaMS) through speaker talks, career center workshops, and field trips to research and industry partners. This course is intended for natural and applied science majors. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Required for all CPaMS Scholars in their second year. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. Same course as CS 200 , MA 200 , ST 200 . (Pass/Fail) (Fall only)
  
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    PH 201 - General Physics I

    (4.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: MA 251 , PH 291  or written permission of the department chair. Designed for majors in the physical sciences. Topics include vectors, kinematics, Newton's laws and dynamics, conservation laws, rigid body equilibrium, rotational mechanics, oscillatory motion, fluid mechanics and motion in a gravitational field, and wave motion. Fundamental concepts of vector analysis and calculus are developed. Fulfills one math/science core requirement. (Fall only)
  
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    PH 202 - General Physics II

    (4.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 201 . Corequisite: MA 252 ; PH 292  or written permission of the department chair. A continuation of PH 201  which includes classical electromagnetic theory and geometrical optics. Fulfills one math/science core requirement. (Spring only)
  
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    PH 271 - Introduction to Scientific Programming

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 101  or PH 201 . An introduction to computer programming and applications in physics. Topics include numerical solution of problems in classical mechanics, use of computer algebra systems, and work with numerical packages. No prior programming experience is required.
  
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    PH 291 - General Physics Lab I

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: PH 201 . An introduction to experimental physics stressing principles of measurement, treatment and presentation of data and error analysis with experiments taken primarily from mechanics. (Fall only)
  
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    PH 292 - General Physics Lab II

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 291  or written permission of the department chair. Corequisite: PH 202 . A continuation of PH291 with experiments taken from sound, wave motion, electrostatics, DC and AC circuits, and geometrical optics. Basic electronic instrumentation introduced. (Spring only)
  
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    PH 293 - Intermediate Laboratory I

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 202  and PH 292 , or written permission of the department chair. A variety of illustrative and sometimes classic experiments in optics, thermal physics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and quantum physics; also introduces the rigorous analysis of experimental errors. (Fall only)
  
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    PH 294 - Intermediate Laboratory II

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 293  or written permission of the department chair. A continuation of PH 293 , with further experiments in optics, thermal physics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and nuclear and quantum physics. Extends discussion of error analysis to include use of partial derivatives and statistical distributions. (Spring only)
  
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    PH 307 - Mathematical Methods in Physics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: MA 252  Development of the mathematical methods needed to describe waves and vector fields. Topics include power series, complex numbers, linear algebra, Fourier series, and vector calculus. Physical examples cover harmonic oscillations, coupled oscillations, and traveling waves. The course provides a solid mathematical foundation for the advanced physics courses.
  
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    PH 312 - Modern Physics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 202 .
      An introduction to the two major revolutionary developments in physics during the twentieth century, namely Einstein's special theory of relativity and quantum physics. Topics in relativity include simultaneity, the Lorentz transformations, and mass/energy equivalence. Topics in quantum physics include wave/ particle duality, the Uncertainty Principle, quantization of energy and angular momentum, atomic orbitals, and the infinite square well model. (Fall only)
  
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    PH 316 - Classical Mechanics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 202  and MA 351 . Recommended Corequisite: MA 304  Foundations and applications of Newtonian dynamics are applied to single particle systems, many particle systems, and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions.
  
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    PH 317 - Thermal Physics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 201 . An examination of classical thermodynamic concepts including temperature, heat, entropy, free energy, and thermodynamic cycles. Also introduces the concepts of probability and statistical physics with an emphasis on the kinetic theory of gases. (Spring only)
  
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    PH 382 - Biomechanics of Sports and Exercise

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the applications of classical mechanics to biological problems, particularly human movement. This includes internal biomechanics which is concerned with the structural functioning of the human musculoskeletal system, as well as external biomechanics which focuses on external forces and their effects on the body and its movement.
  
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    PH 383 - Physics of Medicine and the Human Body

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 101  or PH 201 . Expands on introductory physics courses through the study of mechanics, fluids, and sound as they are applied to the human body. Examples include biomechanics, metabolism, cardiovascular system, lungs, and alveoli, and hearing. Modern medical instrumentation is covered, particularly MRI, PET, and the gamma camera. Hands-on activities are included. A field trip may be required. IFS (Spring only, Even Years)
  
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    PH 384 - Waves and the Physics of Medicine

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 101  or PH 201 . Expands on introductory physics courses through the study of geometric optics, interaction of light with tissue, nuclear physics, and ultrasound, as they are applied to modern medical instrumentation. Examples include fiber optics, CT, gamma camera, PET, MRI, and ultrasound imaging. Hands-on activities are included. One field trip may be required. IFS (Spring only) (Odd Years)
  
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    PH 388 - Independent Project in Physics or Astronomy

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    A supervised project including a public presentation of results. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    PH 391 - Physics Research

    (3.00 cr.)

    A supervised research project including a public presentation of results. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    PH 397 - Experimental Methods I

    (2.00 cr.)

    A combined lecture/laboratory course treating the methods and instrumentation used in contemporary physics (along with other technological fields). The major emphasis of the course is on analog and digital electronics. (Fall only)
  
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    PH 398 - Experimental Methods II

    (2.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 397  or written permission of the department chair. A continuation of PH 397 , including an extended treatment of computer interfacing and automated data acquisition. (Spring only)
 

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