2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Dec 01, 2020  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
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    HS 455 - Historic Preservation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. Historic preservation involves the ecology of our "built environment." It asks what sorts of buildings and neighborhoods contribute to our sense of community and well-being, and how these buildings and neighborhoods might be preserved for this and future generations. Preservationists have assembled an array of economic and legal tools to encourage the profitable restoration or adaptive reuse of America's most valuable buildings and neighborhoods. Contains three main elements: a study of American architectural history and styles, with field experience in "learning to look" at the built environment; consideration of recent trends in the preservation movement in the United States and in Maryland, including a trip to the annual conference of the Maryland Historic Trust; and a field exercise in architectural and community history in Baltimore.
  
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    HS 460 - Seminar: American Progressivism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  Focuses on the attempts of Americans to control explosive change in the early twentieth-century urbanization, the impacts of industrialization, and the troubling relationship between big business and political institutions in a democracy. Topics include the background and motivations of progressive reformers; their attempts to assimilate or coerce immigrants; and the effect of the progressive consciousness on matters of race, gender, and social class. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU
  
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    HS 461 - Seminar: The African Diaspora

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. Focuses on the African background to American history. Premised upon the notion that Africa occupies a more prominent position in the study of the genesis of American culture than is usually acknowledged, the multidisciplinary course examines the structures (for example, the transatlantic slave trade) that ushered Africans to British America from the seventeenth through the early nineteenth centuries. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to sense the Africans' experiences from their point of departure to their arrival and subsequent process of enslavement in the New World. Taking into full account the Africans' role in the Americas, student are asked to reexamine and challenge the negative stereotypes that have historically perpetuated misunderstanding about peoples of African descent. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT/IAF
  
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    HS 463 - Seminar: Colonial British America

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  Focuses on the British colonies in mainland North America and the West Indies during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Particular attention is paid to three broad issues: the relationship between the physical environment and process of colonization; cultural interactions and conflicts between Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans and the influence of those relationships on the development of colonial societies; and the social and economic integration of the colonies with one another and with the broader Atlantic world during this period. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU
  
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    HS 464 - Seminar: Social and Political History of Alcohol and Drugs in America

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. Psychoactive substances, both legal and illegal, have been integral components of economic, cultural, social, and political life in the United States. Focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, topics include the social and class functions of drinking and bar culture; gender and alcohol; the rise of drugs in modern culture; temperance reform; successes and failures of alcohol and narcotics regulation and prohibition; and the contradictory postwar developments of a diseased-based, therapeutic model of drug and alcohol dependency; and the popularity of alcohol and drugs in consumer society and counterculture. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    HS 465 - Seminar: Inside the Civil War

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. Key topics in the social and political history of the Civil War are explored with the goal of gaining deeper understanding of the human and policy dimensions of the conflict. The experience of ordinary soldiers and civilians is the center of discussion; however, specific issues that challenged Americans during the conflict are also examined. These include guerrilla warfare and relationships between soldiers and civilians in war zones; the war's impact on slavery and race; prison camps and prisoner exchanges; attitudes toward death in American culture during the war; the war's different home fronts; patriotism and resistance; government authority and its limits; gender and family life; and experience and memory. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    HS 466 - Seminar: Revolutionary Lives: Biography and the New Nation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. Employs biography as a lens to explore the era of the American Revolution and Early American Republic. Biographies of the famous (e.g., Washington, Hamilton, Franklin, Paine) and not so-famous (e.g. a Boston shoemaker, a Maine midwife, and an enslaved African American in Charleston, SC) are used to examine how individuals shaped, and were shaped by, larger social, political, economic, and cultural shifts that occurred during these tumultuous years. The specific topics/biographies vary by year. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU
  
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    HS 470 - Seminar: The Hundred Years War

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  The Hundred Years War did more to disrupt the politics, economy, and society of continental Western Europe, thus bringing an end to the Middle Ages, than did any other event. This course follows the chronology of the war by highlighting its origin; military conflicts; effect on society, economy, ecclesiastic affairs, and politics; and conclusion. It focuses on the major players-France, England, Burgundy, the southern Low Countries-with frequent visits to the conflict's spread into the Holy Roman Empire, Italy, the Iberian Peninsula, and even into the Middle East. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IM
  
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    HS 472 - Seminar: Frontiers and Frontier Peoples in the Middle Ages

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  Medieval Europeans were surrounded by peoples who were not like them. Encounters between the Europeans and those living on the frontiers were frequent. They occurred for different reasons, including warfare, conversion, pilgrimage, exploration, and tourism. This seminar studies the interaction of each group separately. Frontier peoples include Germanic barbarians, Huns, Scots-Irish, Auars/Magyars, Vikings, Andalusian Muslims, Mongols, Cathars, Livonians, Hussites, Tartars, and Ottomans. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IM
  
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    HS 473 - Seminar: Ending Anarchy in Seventeenth-Century Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. European societies were in crisis in the seventeenth century. Religious passions and political rebellions, wars, famine, and intellectual revolution threatened social order. The resolution of this turmoil produced the English parliamentary system and the French form of "absolutism"-two very different paths to stability. This seminar examines the courts of Louis XIV and other monarchs to determine how they achieved solutions to the problems of their times. It also studies the creation of cultural policies that encouraged the spread of new ideas. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    HS 474 - Holocaust Memory in Germany and America

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. By the early twenty-first century, the Holocaust—the murder of six million European Jews—had come to represent the epitome of evil, an event in history that stands as the reference point for contemporary morality. In 1945, this was not as clear. This course explores how the meaning of the Holocaust as a singular event emerged and changed across generations after 1945 in two very different national contexts: Germany and America. The class examines the role of public history sites such as exhibitions, memorials, and museums, and popular culture such as films and literature, and scholarly debates. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT/IU
  
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    HS 475 - Seminar: The Persecution of the Christians in the Roman World

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  An exploration of the causes, nature, and extent of early Christian persecutions until Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire in the fourth century. Topics include the Jewish-Greek-Roman environment of early Christianity; Rome's policies toward foreign cults; Christians' reputation for extreme promiscuity and cultic atrocities; comparison with competing cults; the danger of open profession of the new faith; and Christian acceptance of the ancient world. Given the muddled understanding of the early Christian persecutions, we shall examine and dispel the myths and bring some order to the chaos. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Same course as CL 324 . IC/IM
  
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    HS 477 - Seminar: Legends in Medieval History

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  Perhaps no other era in history has produced as many enduring legends as the Middle Ages. Robin Hood, Arthur of Camelot, Count Dracula, Macbeth, Charlemagne, Joan of Arc, and innumerable saints all join dragons, witches, lycanthropes, and other fantastic beasts as major elements of medieval popular culture. Study of their historicity, legendary use, and effect on medieval society proves a valuable tool to understanding the intellectual history of medieval Europe. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IM
  
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    HS 479 - Seminar: Masculinity and Honor in Modern Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. As part of the general evolution of gender studies, historians have come to realize that both male and female roles are not automatic or natural, but rather tend to be constructed by contemporary social forces. One particularly volatile or rather malleable aspect of such constructions is the notion of honor, which has substantially evolved over the last 500 years. Students examine the nature of this evolution and discusses the impact of the Renaissance, nationalism, capitalism, and liberalism on the definition of what it meant to have honor and how such rituals as knife-fighting, dueling, vendetta, and even nose-biting all served to identify and reinforce masculine behavior among classes and across centuries. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    HS 480 - Seminar: Cold War in Southern Africa

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. Analyzes U.S. policy toward Southern Africa from the end of World War II to the present. The overarching theme is the impact of Cold War competition between the United States and the Soviet Union on African decolonization and nation-building. Special emphasis placed on U.S. relations with Zaire (the Congo), Angola, Mozambique, Zimbabwe (Southern Rhodesia), Namibia, and South Africa. Key issues considered include conflict and compatibility between African nationalism and decolonization and U.S. economic, military, and strategic interests; continuity and change in U.S.-African policy; options and directions for the future. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT/IAF
  
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    HS 481 - Seminar: The History of Disability in Comparative Perspective

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  Students explore the history of disability in global and comparative perspective and examine how different societies across time and place, both Western and non-Western, have determined who is able and who is disabled, who is normal and who is abnormal. They focus on selected topics including deafness, blindness, madness, the eugenics programs, and the disability rights movement to understand how disability has been tied to constructions of citizenship, power, and ethics. Students visit several online disability museums and archives and work with a wide variety of primary and secondary sources. Written or electronic permission of instructor. GT
  
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    HS 482 - Asian Studies Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. Examines the various traditions of Asia and relates them to present-day Asian life through reading, discussion, and research. Students write a final 15-20 page research paper on a topic of their choice in consultation with the instructor. Because the course also serves as the capstone seminar for the Asian Studies minor, it takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding modern Asia. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT/IA
  
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    HS 483 - Seminar: Soseki and Mishima: Mirrors of Modern Japan

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  Soseki (1867-1916) is generally regarded as the greatest novelist in Japan's modern history; Mishima (1925-1970) is recognized as one of the leading post-World War II writers. Using selected works of these authors, students focus on the authors' artistic methods and visions; reflection of the course of Japanese civilization in the twentieth century; and depiction of a culture caught in the tug-of-war between tradition and modernity. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IA
  
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    HS 484 - Seminar: The Chinese Revolution

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. Focuses on the social, cultural, political, and economic roots of four phases of the tumultuous twentieth-century Chinese revolution: the 1911 revolution establishing the Republic of China; the nationalist revolution of the 1920s; the Communist revolution of the 1940s; and the cultural revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT/IA
  
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    HS 486 - Seminar: The Great Age of the European Reconnaissance: Travel and Discovery

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: HS 101 , one HS 300-level course. Overland and overseas travel began centuries before Columbus. Covers the conditions, motives, and goals of those Europeans who began the Great Age of Discovery by using primary accounts in English translations. Examines how Europeans and non-Europeans understood and misunderstood each other. Discusses the consequences for Europe and the societies they encountered. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT/IC
  
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    HS 487 - Seminar: Comparative Revolutions in Latin America

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. A comparison of twentieth-century revolutionary movements focusing on Argentina, Brazil, Columbia, Peru, Chile, Cuba, and Central America. Rural and urban guerilla movements, the development of narcoterrorism, and the role of the United States are examined. Themes include nationalism, state formation, imperialism, agrarian reform, leadership strategies, and citizenship. The goal of the course is for students to acquire a deeper understanding of the nature of exploitation and oppression in Latin America and the continuing struggles for social justice. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT/IL
  
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    HS 488 - Seminar: Political Violence and Terrorism in the Modern World

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  Political violence has been a constant feature of the twentieth and now the twenty-first century. Much of this violence has its origins in colonial people seeking political independence together with ethnic, racial, and religious minorities seeking redress from what they consider subjugation. To reach their goals, such groups have employed a variety of irregular armed strategies, variously labeled legitimate by one side but terrorism by the other. Class discussion addresses the kinds of violence independent and insurgent groups have used in seeking their goals, as well as the counter-guerrilla or counter-terrorist tactics used against them. The course begins with independence movements in Colonial Cuba, South Africa, and the Philippines. Special attention is given to post-1945 Latin America and independence movements in the French and British empires. It discusses the difference between guerrilla warfare and terrorism and ends with contemporary political and religious violence. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT/IL
  
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    HS 489 - Seminar: America in the Middle East

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course.  Explores the complex history of America's interaction with the Middle East, beginning with the first Barbary war fought in North Africa in 1801 and ending with the invasion of Iraq in 2003. Topics include Protestant Christian missionary activity; the American brand of orientalism; the United States' involvement in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; the Arabian Gulf; and the politics of oil and cultural encounters and exchanges. Students work with primary sources such as diplomatic documents and other official records, missionary reports, newspapers, memoirs, literature, art, and advertising. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT
  
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    HS 490 - Seminar: Environmental History in Latin America

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course, one HS 300-level course. Explores how humans and the environment have interacted over time in the Americas from pre-Columbian populations to the recent past. The study of historical change in human-nature interactions reveals both how people have affected the environment and how nature has shaped human actions. Because of the wide range of research methods and topics it embraces, the burgeoning field of Environmental History is both compelling and challenging. This course examines diverse views of nature, ecological effects of shifting agricultural and consumption patterns, the impact of technological advances, political ecology, conservation, and environmental movements. In part, this course seeks to define what constitutes "Environmental History" and to determine if there is a coherent set of problems and issues that this emergent field addresses.
      Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT/IES/IL
  
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    HS 499 - Capstone Project in American Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    As the capstone experience for the American Studies minor, each student develops an independent research project, internship, or service-based project, to be advised by two professors from different departments and presented at an end-of-year American Studies Symposium. The project constitutes the culmination of the student's work in American Studies and provides an opportunity for the student to bring together the perspectives of two different disciplines on a research area of particular interest. A project proposal must be submitted to and approved by the American Studies committee prior to registration for either the fall or spring semesters of senior year. The project must contain both a research and a formal writing component (the equivalent of a 20-25 page research paper). Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU

Honors Program

  
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    HN 201 - The Human Drama: The Ancient World

    (4.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. The first in the four-course, interdisciplinary exploration of human history, extending from the ancient to the modern world, which Honors Program students take in the freshman and sophomore years. (Fall only)
  
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    HN 202 - The Human Drama: The Medieval World

    (4.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. The second in the four-course, interdisciplinary exploration of human history, extending from the ancient to the modern world, which Honors Program students take in the freshman and sophomore years. IM/IC (Spring only)
  
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    HN 203 - The Human Drama: The Renaissance to Modernity

    (4.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. The third in a four-course, interdisciplinary exploration of human history, extending from the ancient to the modern world, which Honors Program students take in the freshman and sophomore years. IC (Fall only)
  
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    HN 204 - The Human Drama: The Modern World

    (4.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. The fourth in a four-course, interdisciplinary exploration of human history, extending from the ancient to the modern world, which Honors Program students take in the freshman and sophomore years. (Spring only)
  
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    HN 210 - Eloquentia Perfecta

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. A course in analytical thinking, writing, and speaking. Aimed at helping Honors students to become better readers, listeners, speakers, and writers, each section of the course focuses on a particular theme or topic. Students read texts pertinent to the section's theme or topic, analyze the arguments and rhetoric of those texts, produce their own analytical writing, and make oral presentations. (Fall only)
  
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    HN 215 - Engaging Nature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. An introductory science course which emphasizes close observation of the natural world, problem solving, and hypothesis development. It is designed to introduce students to science as a "way of knowing" and to the nature of scientific research and debate. (Spring only)
  
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    HN 216 - Honors Science: Special Topics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. An in-depth study of a topic in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, physics, or mathematics and statistics. Topic announced each time the course is offered. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors.
  
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    HN 217 - The Chemistry Within Us

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. Examines biomedical research and experimental medicine using an interdisciplinary approach and focusing on four major themes: frontiers of medical research; diseases; drugs, and drug development; and food science. Students are provided an opportunity to reexamine biochemical ideas at great depth. Includes specific applications and examples ranging from modern drugs and the drug design process to the chemistry of food and smells, and from cancer biology to stem cell research. Fulfills the math/science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors.
  
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    HN 218 - Computational Thinking: Exploring Computing through Robotics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. An introduction to the great ideas of computing through hands-on experiments with robotics. The course explores the nature and limits of computers; engages with the philosophical and social implications of intelligent machines; and asks what the science of computing can tell us about creativity, reasoning, and the human mind. Students gain experience developing logical thinking using a programming language to control small robots; conducting field studies to obtain data; storing and accessing data from a database using queries; and performing data analysis with spreadsheet formulas. Fulfills the math/science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors. Same course as CS 218 .
  
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    HN 219 - Grand Challenges and Nanotechnology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: HN 215 . Restricted to junior or senior Honors students. The scientific community has identified a number of "Grand Challenges" facing humankind. Solving these challenges will have a profound impact in a variety of areas, including health, the environment and sustainability, energy production and consumption, and economic development. This seminar examines the current ideas related to Grand Challenges, with review of relevant scientific principles in the context of these challenges. Special emphasis is placed on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and their potential impact on addressing the needs of and providing solutions to Grand Challenges. Fulfills the math/science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors.
  
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    HN 221 - Edgar Allan Poe, Sherlock Holmes, and the Evolution of Forensic Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. An examination of forensic science via historical and modern influences. This course explores intriguing fictional and real case studies ranging from Marie Roget (Mary Rogers), Jack the Ripper, Casey Anthony, and others to understand the roles of forensic science in criminal investigations, as well as the public fascination with death and the macabre. A series of hands-on activities and field trips are used to put unsolved murders into proper context. The course capstone includes investigation of real cold cases in which students provide their own fresh analyses of unsolved homicides. Fulfills the math/science core requirement for Honors nonscience majors. IFS
  
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    HN 320 - Art and Intellectual History: Renaissance to Modern

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. Examines canonical art works of the western tradition in the context of key intellectual and artistic developments through close reading of primary sources and the formal and iconographic readings of works of art. Fulfills the fine arts core requirement for Honors students. Closed to students who have taken AH 111 .
  
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    HN 321 - Introduction to Theatrical Production

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. A comprehensive, experiential course in theatrical production. Students engage in major areas of production (acting, directing, design), as well as playwriting, theatre criticism, and the staging of an original theatre piece. Includes attendance at theatre productions on campus and in the Baltimore/Washington area. (Theatre tickets cost approximately $50.) Fulfills fine arts core requirement for Honors students. Closed to students who have taken DR 251 . Same course as DR 252 .
  
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    HN 322 - Western Musical Traditions

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. An introduction to the major forms and styles in the western musical tradition, with an emphasis on guided listening of masterworks and the study of issues in musical aesthetics through scholarly and primary source texts. Aims to develop a more perceptive and informed listener and to introduce skills in music scholarship. Fulfills fine arts core requirement for Honors students, Class of 2018 and beyond. Closed to students who have taken MU 203 . Same course as MU 204 .
  
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    HN 323 - Photographic Vision: Tools, Techniques, and Theories

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Honors students. Students work with film and digital single lens reflex (SLR) cameras in the studio, darkroom, and computer lab. Students learn to use their cameras to craft thoughtful, intentional photographs and to enrich their understanding through careful readings of core texts of photographic theory and analysis of historical and contemporary photographs. Fulfills fine arts core requirement for Honors students. Closed to students who have taken PT 300 . Same course as PT 301 .
  
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    HN 499 - The Examined Life

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to senior Honors students. Serves as a capstone for the Honors curriculum. It includes revisiting ethical concerns and issues raised in earlier Honors courses, rereading relevant texts, and introducing new texts and ethical issues when appropriate. Fulfills the Honors ethics course requirement. (Spring only)

Information Systems

  
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    IS 251 - Information Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 111  or CS 115  or CS 117  or CS 118  or CS 151  or CS 201 or  CS 218  or HN 218  or HN 318 . Students are immersed in the strategic use of information technology (IT) to solve business problems. They examine the role of IT in organizations and the integration of information systems (IS) into business activities enabling quality, timeliness, and competitive advantage. Students apply database, spreadsheet, and presentation skills to solve real world business challenges. Recommended completion during sophomore year.
  
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    IS 352 - Applications Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IS 251  or BH 251 ; IS 353  (may be taken concurrently). Restricted to business administration majors with a concentration in information systems. An introduction to software development with an emphasis on mobile applications. Students are introduced to transaction processing systems and management support systems. Principles of program design, programming structures, data structures, program testing, and debugging are covered. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of programs with graphical user interfaces and event-driven code. No prior programming experience is required. (Fall only)
  
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    IS 353 - Data Management and Database Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 220 , IS 251  or BH 251 , MA 151  or MA 251 ; or written permission of the instructor. Restricted to students with a concentration or minor in information systems. Students analyze, create a logical design, and implement the physical design for a database information system-a cornerstone of business transactions. The course includes a database project from a current situation at a real company that allows students to analyze the data needs of an organization, translate user requirements into a database system, and implement the system using leading database management systems.
  
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    IS 355 - Networks and Security

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IS 353  or written permission of the department chair. Explores the technologies underlying today's networking, multimedia, electronic business, and entertainment industries. This course balances technical and managerial content while covering a broad range of topics, including the strategic role of telecommunications, networking infrastructure, security, encryption, audio, video, intellectual property rights, and the history and politics of the telecommunications industries. (Spring only)
  
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    IS 356 - Information Technology for Financial Services

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 320  or BH 320 , IS 251  or BH 251 . At a time when information is critical to corporate success, financial service firms continue to be the largest consumers of information technology (IT). The impact of IT across U.S. and European equities markets, brokerage companies, bond trading, and electronic banking is examined. Students gain a thorough understanding of how IT is used by financial services firms for competitive advantage. This course builds on the theory of equities markets by allowing students to engage in simulated stock market transactions and to apply financial theories in a practical, real-world setting.
  
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    IS 358 - Business Intelligence and Data Mining

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 220 , IS 251  or BH 251 , MA 151  or MA 251 ; or written permission of the department chair. Students are introduced to data mining as a technology to discover information and knowledge from large datasets for business decisions. Students utilize SAS Enterprise Miner™ to perform data mining using methods such as clustering, regression and decision trees. Students develop a project using current business intelligence technology for data mining. Forms the foundation for customer relationship management in marketing and forensic accounting. IFS
  
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    IS 360 - Management of Global Information Technology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IS 251  or BH 251  or CS 301  or CS 312 . Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher.. Exposes students to the challenges of establishing a successful and globally competitive information technology (IT) industry. Students study historical, economic, political, labor, and social factors leading to the establishment of country-specific centers of IT excellence. In particular, students study what led multinational corporations to base their overseas activities within a specific location. Students are expected to attend a series of classes during the regular semester and to then travel to the international destination to meet with company executives and to tour company facilities. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. GT
  
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    IS 452 - Special Topics in Information Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IS 251  or BH 251 . Students explore information systems in a variety of formats and subject areas.
  
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    IS 453 - Information Systems Analysis and Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IS 353  or written permission of the department chair. Prepares students to play a significant role in the development of information systems in organizations. Students learn to complete the phases of the systems development life cycle-feasibility, analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance-using structured tools and techniques, project management, and oral presentations. Topics also include the roles of systems analysts, designers, and programmers, as well as global and ethical concerns in systems development.
  
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    IS 458 - Web-Enabled Applications

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IS 251  or BH 251 , IS 352 , IS 353 , IS 358 , and IS 453 ; or written permission of the department chair. IS 355  may be taken concurrently. Students explore and apply effective use of the technologies associated with web applications including HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript or jQuery, and social media, all essential to modern companies. In this capstone course, students integrate all of the previous information systems courses, develop a plan for an entrepreneurial business, and create a sophisticated web-enabled senior project. (Spring only)
  
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    IS 459 - Research Project in Information Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to senior business administration majors with a concentration in information systems. Students develop individual research in a specific area of mutual interest with a faculty member. The student must begin with a written plan for the project and conclude with a written research report. Written or electronic permission of the department chair. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    IS 499 - Internship in Information Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IS 352 , IS 353 , IS 358 , IS 453 ; or written permission of the instructor. IS 352 , IS 353 , or IS 453  may be taken concurrently. Restricted to seniors. Students participate in individual study and group preparation and reflection while working in a technology-related position for an enterprise. Students work with an executive or information systems professional, performing duties that are matched with Loyola coursework. Each internship is constructed by an information systems professor in conjunction with the on-site internship supervisor. Students work with the professor before engagement and at the end of the term. Only one internship course may count toward graduation requirements.

International Business

  
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    IB 282 - International Business

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the external environments that affect cross-boarder business transactions, including cultural, political, economic, and legal environment factors. Students learn to integrate international frameworks for trade, foreign investment, and foreign exchange transactions. GT/IA
  
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    IB 415 - International Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , IB 282  or BH 282 , MG 201  or BH 201 .  Investigates business policy, strategy, structure, and process in an international context. Focuses on the international business environment and management practices outside the United States. Students develop an understanding of the complex and varied role of the general manager in a nondomestic environment. Topics include the international environment; the role of the general manager overseas; and global strategies, policies, and processes. Same course as MG 415 . GT
  
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    IB 429 - Applied Research in International Business

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 . Restricted to senior business administration majors with a concentration in international business or international business minors. Capstone course that requires students to draw upon their international business knowledge to complete a semester-long applied project. Projects may take the form of a consulting or other report on topics such as foreign-market entry analysis, comanufacturing site location analysis, strategic alliance partner selection analysis, among others. (Spring only)
  
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    IB 470 - Special Topics in International Business

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , and 60 credits. Readings and discussion in selected areas of international business. Past topics include emerging markets and international and comparative management. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    IB 471 - Cross-Cultural Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , and 60 credits. Restricted to business administration majors with a concentration in international business or international business minors. Designed for students to address the unique challenges of managing across different national and cultural boundaries. An in-depth investigation into the effects of national culture on individual behaviors is involved.  The course then builds upon that basis to consider how cultural differences influence decision-making, negotiation, communication, motivation, and teamwork processes. This course culminates in an investigation of how individuals can effectively manage in a global business environment. (Fall only)
  
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    IB 472 - Cross-Cultural Exchanges

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , and 60 credits. Enables students to maximize their study abroad/international experiences by way of theory and practice, sharing and collaborating with one another, and learning from one another's methods, assumptions, values, knowledge, and points of view. Methods of instruction focus on providing a forum for cross-cultural exchange and collaboration among students through use of videos, podcasts, readings, interactive exercises, discussion boards, and group assignments involving their study abroad/international experience. (Spring only)
  
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    IB 473 - Global Strategic Alliances

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , and 60 credits. Provides students with a hands-on, experientially-based knowledge of the role, evolution, selection, and management of strategic alliances. Through readings, assignments and activities, students develop their capacities to use the vocabulary and understand the drivers of strategic alliances, understand the alliance life cycle and each of its major components, identify the critical aspects in managing strategic alliances, and conduct a comprehensive alliance partner selection analysis. GT (Fall only)
  
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    IB 482 - Global Strategy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 . Restricted to senior business administration majors with a concentration in international business or international business minors. An upper-level seminar for international business students that brings together the managerial and environmental dynamics at work in the global economy. Incorporates all aspects of international business to enable managers to develop, implement, and evaluate a global strategy for the firm, be it family-owned, or a transnational corporation. Specific firms, industries and/or regions may be selected for study. (Fall only)
  
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    IB 499 - International Business Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 . To augment classroom learning with practical field experience, internships are arranged in area companies and state, federal, or international organizations. Students must develop a research topic in conjunction with their instructor and the host institution. A "mentor" with the host organization helps students in the identification and completion of the research project which must be an international business topic. Periodically, students meet with the instructor in groups or individually. A minimum of 150 hours of internship in the host organization is required. Written or electronic permission of the department chair or instructor. Only one internship course may count toward graduation requirements. A journal of activities and a final report are required.

Italian

  
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    IT 101 - Introductory Italian I

    (3.00 cr.)

    A thorough grounding in the four language skills: reading, understanding, writing, and speaking, as well as an understanding of the structure of the language and the literature and culture of the country. For students with no previous knowledge of the language. Cannot be taken for credit by students who have taken three years of Italian during high school. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    IT 102 - Introductory Italian II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of IT 101 . Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    IT 103 - Intermediate Italian I

    (3.00 cr.)

    A systematic consolidation and expansion of the four basic skills: reading, understanding, speaking, and writing. To increase and perfect students' acquired abilities/proficiencies in the language, and broaden their understanding of the country's culture and literature. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    IT 104 - Intermediate Italian II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone course reviewing and reinforcing language skills learned in IT 101-103 to help students attain intermediate level as defined by ACTFL guidelines in the five skills: reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, and culture of Italy and Italian-speaking areas. Course includes use of the language in context, with authentic readings, discussion in Italian, and film clips. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    IT 110 - Introductory Italian Language in Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to students studying in Rome. On-site, intensive Italian instruction for the complete beginner: survival skills plus. Closed to students who have taken IT 102 , IT 103 , IT 104 , or equivalents.
  
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    IT 111 - Italian Language and Culture I: Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IT 103  or placement by examination. Restricted to students studying in Rome. A continuation of Italian language study. Intensive oral practice with contemporary materials.
  
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    IT 150 - Italian in Context I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Placement by examination. Restricted to students studying in Rome. Italian language study with intensive oral practice and review of elementary language structures. Includes contemporary culture in Rome and comprehension strategies for five-skills abilities.
  
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    IT 151 - Italian in Context II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Placement by examination. Restricted to students studying in Rome. A continuation of IT 150 .
  
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    IT 161 - Comprehensive Beginning Italian

    (6.00 cr.)

    A review course for students who have had three years of language study in high school and for students who wish to begin a second modern language. The material covered is essentially the same as for the IT 101-102 sequence, except that it is covered in one semester instead of two. This includes a thorough grounding in the five language skills: reading, listening, speaking, writing, and cultural knowledge, as well as an understanding of the structure of the language, cultures, and literatures of the countries that speak Italian. Special emphasis is placed on preparing students to begin work at the intermediate language level. Open to students who wish to begin study in a second modern language or who place into IT 102 . Contact time includes six 50-minute class sessions per week. Counts as two, three-credit courses. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required. Required for students who have completed three years of high school Italian, who wish to continue language study in Italian, and who place into IT 101 . Closed to students who have taken IT 101 , IT 102 , or the equivalent.
  
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    IT 162 - Comprehensive Intermediate Italian

    (6.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed IT 102  or IT 161  or placed into IT 103 . The material covered is essentially the same as for the IT 103-104 sequence, except that it is covered in one semester instead of two. It consists of a systematic consolidation and expansion of the four basic skills: reading, understanding, speaking, and writing. To increase and perfect students' acquired abilities/proficiencies in the language and broaden their understanding of the country's culture and literature, the second half is a capstone reviewing and reinforcing language skills to help students attain the intermediate level as defined by ACTFL guidelines in the five skills: reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, and culture of Italy and Italian-speaking areas. The course includes the use of the language in context-with authentic readings, discussion in Italian, and film clips. Counts as two three-credit courses. Contact time includes six 50-minute class sessions per week. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required. Closed to students who have taken IT 103 , IT 104 , or the equivalent.
  
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    IT 201 - Italian Composition and Conversation I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IT 104  or IT 162 . Students develop their ability to write and speak correctly and creatively in Italian through models of advanced linguistic structural patterns, related grammar, examples of usage, and composition exercises. Oral practice enhanced through the use of videos. May be offered in Rome. II
  
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    IT 202 - The Living Language

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite:  IT 104  or IT 162  or IT 201 . A transition between language study on the lower-division level, where grammar and oral practice are stressed, to more advanced upper-division courses in which the language becomes the primary means of expression and communication. Special emphasis is put on the study of Italian immigration into the United States, considering different aspects with the help of Italian literature, history, movies, and personal narratives. May be offered in Rome. II/IU
  
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    IT 205 - Italian for Business

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IT 104  or IT 162  or IT 201 . Familiarizes students with specialized vocabulary, types of documents, protocol, and styles of correspondence related to economy and the business world. Special emphasis on increasing students' international perspective and on development of skills necessary to work effectively in a multicultural setting. May be offered in Rome. II
  
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    IT 210 - Italian Composition and Conversation II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IT 104  or IT 162 . Develops writing and speaking ability in Italian through models of style, related grammar, composition exercises, and the Internet. Comprehension and speaking are developed through the use of varied media. May be offered in Rome. II
  
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    IT 212 - Italian Language and Culture II: Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IT 111  or placement by examination. Restricted to students studying in Rome. A continuation of Italian language study. Intensive oral practice with contemporary materials. II
  
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    IT 213 - Italian Language and Culture III: Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IT 212  or placement by examination. Restricted to students studying in Rome. A continuation of Italian language study. Intensive oral practice with contemporary materials. II
  
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    IT 214 - Oral Proficiency in Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IT 202  or placement by examination. Restricted to students studying in Rome. Intensive oral practice in the classroom and with audiovisual media to develop facility in oral expression and aural comprehension. II
  
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    IT 216 - Exploring the Text

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IT 104  or IT 162  or IT 201 . A preparatory course for students who will take advanced literature and culture courses where narrative texts are analyzed in Italian. Students watch films, read plays, poems, short stories, and novels and learn to analyze their structures and themes. All texts are read in the original Italian and placed within their historical, literary, and cultural contexts. The concepts of genre, style, and periodization are also studied. Students learn to discuss literature, cinema, and cultural movements with the correct terms and vocabulary. They will improve their ability to read, write, speak, and analyze in Italian. Students also learn how to conduct secondary research, as well as organize and write a research paper. All lectures, assignments, and exams are in Italian. This course is a recommended prerequisite for all Italian courses at the 300-level and above. May be offered in Rome. II
  
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    IT 301 - Italian Literature and Civilization I: Origins to Reformation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. A study of the historical, political, and artistic development of the Italian peninsula from the first appearance of the Italian language to the Reformation (circa 960-1600), based upon literature. Major authors and movements of the Middle Ages and Renaissance are included. May be offered in Rome. II/IM
  
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    IT 302 - Italian Literature and Civilization II: Romanticism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. A continuation of IT 301 . A study of the historical, political, and artistic development of nineteenth century Italy—from the nationalistic movements to the first years of the country—based upon literary movements of the times. Courses need not be taken in order. May be offered in Rome. II
  
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    IT 303 - Italian Literature and Civilization III: Realism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. A continuation of IT 302 . A study of the historical, political, and artistic development of Italy from the end of the nineteenth century to approximately 1950—from the first years of the country through the postwar years—based upon literary movements of the times. Courses need not be taken in order. May be offered in Rome. II
  
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    IT 304 - Italian Literature and Civilization IV: Contemporary Italy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. A continuation of IT 301  and IT 303 . A study of the historical, political, and artistic developments in Italy since 1950, based upon literary and related movements of the times. Film of other genres may be included. Courses need not be taken in order. May be offered in Rome. II
  
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    IT 310 - The Cinema of Italy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. A comprehensive but selective overview and analysis of the landmarks of Italian cinema, predominantly from World War II onward. The course examines the ways in which Italian cinema reflects the evolution of modern Italy in terms of changing social, political, economic, and cultural developments which characterize twentieth-century Italian life. All lectures, assignments, and exams are in Italian. May be offered in Rome. II
  
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    IT 321 - Italy Today

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: IT 201  (may be taken concurrently). Restricted to students studying in Rome. A study of modern Italian culture and society. Topics vary by semester. Taught in Italian. II
  
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    IT 322 - Italy in Song

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course. An exploration of the vocal music of Italy (mostly post-1861) as a reflection of society. Topics include opera and unification, Caruso and Neapolitan songs, songs of the resistance, folk music and Cantautori, the Festival of San Remo, pop culture, and the music of Italian emigrants and immigrants. Taught in Italian, no musical ability necessary. Attendance at concerts or shows off campus may be required. May be offered in Rome. II
  
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    IT 333 - Topics in Italian Renaissance Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. An introduction to a specific aspect of Italian Renaissance literature in its social, cultural and historical context. Taught in Italian. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be offered in Rome. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. II/IM
  
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    IT 351 - Italian Women Writers of the Renaissance

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. A study of Italian Renaissance women who wrote, their writings, and the social context in which they wrote. Includes lyric poetry, letters, short stories, and longer prose pieces of different literary genres together with canonical examples of similar writings. Vittoria Colonna and Moderata Fonte are examples of authors read. Taught in Italian, readings in Italian. May be offered in Rome. IG/IM
  
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    IT 352 - Dante's Divine Comedy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. An examination of Dante's major opus. Focuses on the historical, political, and philosophical aspects of Dante's masterpiece. Appreciation of Dante's place in world literature. May be offered in Rome. Closed to students who have taken ML 332 . IC/II/IM
  
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    IT 360 - Topics in Italian Theatre

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One IT 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. Selected themes and/or periods in Italian theatre. Special attention is given to the philosophy and social history of the times and to critical theory of this genre. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be offered in Rome. II

Latin

  
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    LT 101 - Introductory Latin I

    (3.00 cr.)

    An enriched beginning course, intended for students with no previous knowledge of the language, which emphasizes grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and reading of easy passages from Latin authors. An introduction to the literature and culture of Rome.
  
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    LT 102 - Introductory Latin II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: LT 101  or equivalent. A continuation of LT 101 .
  
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    LT 103 - Intermediate Latin

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: LT 102  or equivalent. Completion of Latin grammar and syntax.
  
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    LT 104 - Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: LT 103  or equivalent. Selected readings from authors of the golden age of Roman poetry (in particular) and prose. Analysis of styles/genres. IM
  
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    LT 161 - Comprehensive Beginning Latin

    (6.00 cr.)

     

    An intensive course covering the material of LT 101  or LT 102 , or the first half of the Latin grammar sequence.

  
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    LT 200 - Latin Sight Reading

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: LT 101  or equivalent. Reading of selected texts in Latin "at sight" or without preparation. May be repeated four times for credit. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    LT 300 - Latin Prose Composition

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent. Exercises in the translation of sentences and connected passages into felicitous Latin prose. Development of knowledge of correct, idiomatic expression in written Latin.
  
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    LT 301 - Advanced Latin

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent. An intensive reading of an author or genre of advanced Latin. When possible, choice of author or genre is based on student preference. May be offered in Rome. May be repeated once for credit.
  
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    LT 308 - Vergil: Aeneid

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent. A close examination of the masterpiece of literary epic, with emphasis on meter, language, style, characters, and themes. A reading of about six books of the poem in the original Latin. May be offered in Rome. II/IM
 

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