2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Dec 01, 2020  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

English

  
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    EN 098 - English Internships in Private Schools

    (3.00 cr.)

    Qualified seniors may enrich their education by teaching English in a private school. Interns ordinarily are English majors, have completed at least eight upper-division courses, and have a QPA of at least 3.000. During the internship semester, they spend 10 hours per week in a private school, working closely with a mentor who is an experienced teacher, under the supervision of the school's English department. Interns are responsible for keeping journals, meeting regularly with the internship coordinator, and producing a final reflection on the internship experience. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. These internships are limited to Baltimore-area private schools, during the fall or spring semester only. Students should begin preparing for the internship at least one month prior to registration during the semester before the internship takes place.
  
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    EN 099 - English Internships (150 Hours)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Internships give students an opportunity for intensive, hands-on experience in career fields such as publishing, public relations, advertising, journalism, and law. Interns work with a faculty member to design a course that provides them with an opportunity to learn skills specific to a career. They are expected to work at the internship site for approximately 10 hours per week for a total of 150 hours. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Internships may be paid or unpaid, and they are ordinarily limited to fall or spring semesters with Baltimore-based companies, firms, or philanthropic organizations. Summer and out-of-town internships will be approved only under extraordinary circumstances and require the written approval of the department chair. Students should begin planning for the internship at least one month before registration during the semester before the internship takes place. May be taken once for degree credit, but does not count toward the English major or minor.
  
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    EN 101 - Understanding Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to literature and literary analysis, focusing primarily on poetry and short fiction. The course teaches critical concepts and methods. It is writing intensive, with an emphasis placed on students' ability to develop clear and persuasive arguments in prose.
  
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    EN 180 - Introduction to Film and Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces cinematic techniques and critical methods by exploring the relationships between film and literature. The course may be organized around themes, genres, or periods; writing assignments range from screenplay treatments to a research paper. IF
  
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    EN 200 - Major Writers: Special Topics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of selected works written in English from two or more historical periods. Offered in Rome only. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    EN 201 - Major Writers: English Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of selected works written by major English writers from two or more historical periods, ranging from the Middle Ages to the present. The course may be organized chronologically, thematically, or by genre. Specific readings and periods covered vary by section.
  
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    EN 203 - Major Writers: American Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of selected works written by major American writers from two or more periods, focusing primarily on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course may be organized chronologically, thematically, or by genre. Specific readings and periods vary by section. Students who take EN 203 may not take EN 366  without written permission of the department chair. IU
  
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    EN 204 - British and American Literature: Coming of Age in Times of Conflict

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . Recommended Prerequisite: WR 100 . Acquaints students with a variety of British and American literary forms: poetic (contemporary poetry), dramatic (film/visual arts), and epic (novel/memoir). Several texts are set in Southeast Asia and explore social, ethical, cultural, and political issues related to the theme of coming of age in times of conflict. Offered in Bangkok only.
  
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    EN 205 - Major Writers: Shakespeare

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . Readings of selected plays by England's greatest dramatist. In this approach designed specifically for the non-English major, the focus is on the human and artistic elements of Shakespeare's world. Readings include selected tragedies and comedies; histories and sonnets may be read as well. Performance and film adaptations may be considered. At least one brief research paper is required. Students majoring in English, or seriously contemplating such a major, should take EN 310  or EN 311  rather than EN 205.
  
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    EN 211 - Major Writers: Classical Mythology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of the traditional stories of the Greeks and Romans as expressed in their literature and art, with an emphasis on the literature's background, value, and influence. Art elective for elementary education majors. Same course as CL 211 . II
  
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    EN 212 - Major Writers: The Classical Epics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of the epic poetry of Homer and Virgil in translation, with an emphasis on the poetry's background, value, and influence. The course may include a short survey of other epics. Same course as CL 212 .
  
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    EN 213 - Major Writers: Greek Drama

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of selected plays in English translation by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and others, with an emphasis on the literature's background, value, and influence. Specific readings vary with the instructor. Same course as CL 213 .
  
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    EN 214 - The Ancient Novel

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of the ancient novel in English translation, with particular emphasis on Apuleius and Petronius-master stylists and literary innovators who chronicled life in the Roman Empire at its most diverse, complex, and decadent. Same course as CL 214 .
  
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    EN 218 - Major Writers: The Golden Age of Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of selected works in translation by some of Rome's greatest writers, with special emphasis on Virgil, Ovid, and Livy. The course may be organized chronologically or thematically. Specific readings vary with the instructor. May be offered in Rome. Same course as CL 218 . II
  
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    EN 300 - English Literary History before 1800

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A survey of some of the most important preromantic authors in English literature in their historical context, thus offering students a coherent overview, as well as an introduction to individual writers and texts. Required for English majors.
  
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    EN 301 - Chaucer

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. Also includes selected readings from Chaucer's other works. IM
  
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    EN 302 - Medieval Love

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A survey of the major authors and works of the period, exclusive of Chaucer. Readings may include medieval drama, especially the English mystery plays; lyric love and religious poetry; romances; and major works such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, and William Langland's Piers Ploughman. IG/IM
  
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    EN 303 - Topics in Italian Influence on Major English Writers

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. Students explore how Italian culture, writing, and history effected major English writers and literature. Topic announced each time the course is offered. Offered in Rome only. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. II
  
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    EN 304 - Arthur and Other Heroes

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. Beginning with the Teutonic hero Beowulf, this course traces the development and changes in the story of the Arthurian heroes. Topics include chivalry, the conflict of medieval values, and the different depictions of the major characters of the legends. IM
  
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    EN 305 - Masterpieces in World Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of selected literary masterworks, mainly in the western tradition. Students read works from a variety of major figures who represent different periods and cultures. The course may be organized chronologically, thematically, or by genre.
  
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    EN 306 - Topics in Medieval Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, theme, or movement in medieval literature. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IM
  
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    EN 307 - Seminar in Medieval Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem or author in medieval literature. Recent topics include, "Reinventing the Middle Ages," "Medieval Heroism," and "Medieval Passion." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IM
  
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    EN 308 - Critical Methodologies (Pre-1800): Special Topics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of an author, theme, genre, or movement, with particular emphasis placed on the differences between distinct critical approaches to the topic at hand. Roughly half of the class material consists of primary texts, and roughly half consists of critical works. Recent topic: "The Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Picturesque." Topic announced each time course is offered.
  
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    EN 310 - Shakespeare I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. The achievement of Shakespeare, primarily the tragedies, set against the background of his time and the works of his contemporaries.
  
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    EN 311 - Shakespeare II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. The achievement of Shakespeare, primarily the comedies, set against the background of his time and the works of his contemporaries.
  
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    EN 312 - Seminar in Shakespeare

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, or problem in Shakespearean literature. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 313 - Renaissance Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of Renaissance poetry, drama, and prose, with primary emphasis on English literature but possible consideration of influential continental traditions and masterworks. Readings may include Dante, Petrarch, Erasmus, Castiglione, Machiavelli, Rabelais, Montaigne, More, Marlowe, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, and Milton.
  
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    EN 317 - Seminar in Renaissance Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem or author in Renaissance literature. Recent topic: "Shakespeare's Rivals." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 320 - Milton

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. Through epic and tragedy, Milton reigns supreme in English. After a brief excursion through his lyrics, this course focuses on his major works-Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes.
  
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    EN 322 - Seventeenth-Century Poetry and Prose

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A survey of the major poets and prose writers between the Renaissance and the Restoration, excluding Milton. Poets covered usually include Donne, Jonson, Herbert, and Marvell; prose writers usually include Bacon, Browne, Hobbes, Burton, and Donne.
  
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    EN 325 - Topics in Seventeenth-Century Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, theme, or movement in seventeenth century literature. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 327 - Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem, or author in seventeenth-century literature. Recent topic: "Love's Alchemy: The Poetry and Prose of John Donne." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 328 - Seminar in Literature and Catholicism (Pre-1800)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem, or author who wrote before 1800, reflecting literary representations of Catholic thought and/or practice. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IC
  
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    EN 329 - Poetry and Drama, 1660-1800

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A survey of poetry and drama from the Restoration through the end of the eighteenth century. Readings typically are from Congreve, Dryden, Etherege, Gay, Farquhar, Goldsmith, Johnson, Pope, Sheridan, Swift, Thomson, and Wycherly, with attention to both the development of drama following its suppression as well as satire and the sublime in poetry.
  
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    EN 330 - The Long Eighteenth Century

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course, and HS 101 . The long eighteenth century (1688-1832) was on its well-polished surface a period of aristocratic dominance and Augustan calm. Yet beneath the surface seethed enormous forces of change-in government and empire, in the arts and letters, and in industry and society. This interdisciplinary course jointly taught by faculty in the Departments of English and History challenges students to read eighteenth-century literature from John Dryden to Jane Austin in the context of eighteenth-century history-and vice versa.
  
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    EN 332 - Literature and the Catholic Imagination (Pre-1800)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of literature that reflects the sacramental vision of Catholic thought before 1800. Topic announced each time course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IC
  
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    EN 334 - Novels of the Eighteenth Century

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. Prose fiction from Swift to Austen, including Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Smollett, Johnson, Walpole, and others.
  
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    EN 335 - Topics in Eighteenth-Century Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, theme, or movement in eighteenth- century literature. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 336 - Seminar in Literature and Film (Pre-1800)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem, or author before 1800 involving both literature and film. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IF
  
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    EN 337 - Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a movement, issue, problem, or figure in eighteenth-century literature. Recent topics include, "Jane Austen and Her World" and "Humor in the Long Eighteenth Century." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 338 - Intensive Independent Study (Pre-1830)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and rigorous study of a literary theme, problem, or author before 1830. Written or electronic permission of the instructor is required. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 339 - Seminar in Literary Topics before 1800

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a literary theme, topic, problem, or author before 1800. Recent topics include, "The Mirror of Love" and "The Art of Biblical Literature." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 345 - Literary Criticism and Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An examination of major schools, movements, and trends in modern literary criticism. Emphasis is placed on the competing practical claims made by literary and critical theory.
  
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    EN 346 - Seminar in Literary Criticism and Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a movement, issue, problem, or figure in literary criticism and theory. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 347 - Seminar in Romantic Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem or author in romantic literature. Recent topics: "It's Not Easy Being Green" and "Excess and the Monstrous." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 350 - The Romantic Movement

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of British literature written during the revolutionary era, 1780-1830, with special attention paid to the poetry and poetic theory of the age. Major figures include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Keats.
  
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    EN 354 - Topics in Romanticism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, theme, or movement in romantic literature. Recent topics include, "Romantic Objects" and "Vision and the Visionary." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 360 - The Nineteenth-Century English Novel

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. Covers the evolution of the novel from Jane Austen through the Age of Reform. Authors studied may include Dickens, Thackeray, Trollope, the Brontes, Hardy, and Eliot. Some reading of applied theory.
  
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    EN 361 - Topics in Victorian Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, theme, or movement in Victorian literature. Recent topic: "Crime, Mystery, and Detection." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 362 - Victorian Poetry: Madmen, Saints, and Sinners

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of the topics and controversies that engaged Victorian imaginations, and the poetic forms that poets chose or invented to explore them. Poets studied include Tennyson, Robert Browning, Arnold, Hopkins, Elizabeth Browning, Christina Rossetti, Meredith, Hardy, and others.
  
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    EN 363 - Seminar in Victorian Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem or author in Victorian literature. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 364 - Literature and the Catholic Imagination (Post-1800)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of literature that reflects the sacramental vision of Catholic thought since 1800. Recent topic: "Tolkien and Lewis." Topic announced each time course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IC
  
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    EN 365 - Seminar in Literature and Catholicism (Post-1800)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem, or author or group of writers who wrote after 1800, reflecting literary depictions of Catholic thought and/or practice. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IC
  
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    EN 366 - American Literature to the First World War

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A survey of primarily nineteenth-century American literature, with special emphasis on the writers of the American Renaissance and the rise of American realism. Students who take EN 203  may not count EN 366 toward their English major. IU
  
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    EN 367 - Topics in American Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, theme, or movement in American literature. Recent topic: "Representing Segregation." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IG/IU
  
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    EN 368 - Critical Methodologies (Post-1800): Special Topics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of an author, theme, genre, or movement, with particular emphasis placed on the differences between distinct critical approaches to the topic at hand. Roughly half of the class material consists of primary texts, and roughly half consists of critical works. Recent topic: "Banned Books." Topic announced each time course is offered.
  
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    EN 369 - The Novel in America

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. This course examines the novel's development as a literary genre in the United States and its relationship to and influence on American society and history. IU
  
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    EN 370 - Modern British and American Fiction

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. The development of English and American fiction from 1900 to 1950, with an emphasis on the evolution of an aesthetic that values poetic composition and experimentation with narrative methods above traditional concepts of narrative structure. Authors studied may include Conrad, Dos Passos, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf.
  
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    EN 371 - Contemporary Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An examination of the key themes, movements, and authors in literature since 1950.
  
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    EN 372 - Modern British and American Poetry

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of a coherent revolution in taste that challenged almost every traditional concept of style, theme, attitude, and structure in poetry. Extensive attention to Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Williams, and Stevens. Other authors are studied as well.
  
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    EN 373 - African American Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of African American literature, with special attention to placing literary expression in the context of slavery, segregation, civil rights, and the black diaspora. The course may survey the development of a black literary tradition, or it may focus on an important era, movement, writer, or issue in that tradition. IAF/IPJ
  
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    EN 374 - Modern Drama

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. Charts the two major streams of naturalism and absurdism in twentieth century drama. Also examines significant developments in contemporary theater. With the exception of works by such influential playwrights as Chekhov and Brecht, the course focuses on modern and contemporary plays by British, Irish, and American authors.
  
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    EN 376 - Postcolonial Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An introduction to writing about the colonized world, from the perspectives of colonized peoples, in order to locate the sources and discuss the conditions of postcolonial thought. GT/IPJ
  
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    EN 377 - Topics in Twentieth-Century Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, theme, or movement in twentieth-century literature. Recent topic: "Literature of the City." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 378 - Race and Ethnicity in American Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An examination of the impact of race and ethnicity in the formation of American literature from the colonial period to the present. Selections include autobiography, poetry, and fiction by authors from a variety of racial and ethic backgrounds. Special attention is given to the impact of slavery, immigration, and the civil rights movement on literary expression. IAF/IU
  
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    EN 379 - Gender in American Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A study of the representation of gender in American literature. Authors studied may include Fern, Hawthorne, Melville, Warner, James, Gilman, Crane, Barnes, Hemingway, Morrison, and Hwang. Literary readings are supplemented by foundation readings in literary and cultural theory. IG/IU
  
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    EN 380 - The History of Narrative Cinema

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An exploration of the origins and development of narrative film, covering the technology of the moving image from sixteenth-century flipbooks to contemporary digital media. Focus is on cinema's importance as a storytelling medium and includes investigation of narrative genres, national film movements, the influence of the classical Hollywood style, and related topics. IF
  
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    EN 382 - Topics in Literature and Film Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of a theme, issue, movement, or tradition in literature and film. Recent topics include, "Shades of Black: Film Noir and Post-War America" and "England Swings: Literature, Film, and Culture in the 1960s." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IF
  
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    EN 383 - Seminar in Modern Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem, or author in modern literature. Recent topics include, "Drama" and "History and Memory in Twentieth-Century Literature." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 384 - Topics in Postcolonial Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, theme, or movement in postcolonial literature, often focusing on literature from a specific geographical area. Recent topic: "Travel Literature." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 385 - Seminar in Postcolonial Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem, or author in postcolonial literature. Recent topic: "Travel Literature." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. GT
  
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    EN 386 - Seminar in Literature and Film (Post-1800)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem, or author after 1800 involving both literature and film. Recent topics include, "The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock," "Nineteenth-Century Novels into Film," and "From Berlin to Hollywood: German Directors and Classic American Film." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IF
  
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    EN 387 - Seminar in Contemporary Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem, or author in contemporary literature. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 388 - Seminar in Multiethnic American Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a writer, theme, issue, movement, or tradition in the multiethnic literature of the United States. Recent topic: "Impersonating Race." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IU
  
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    EN 389 - Seminar in Literature and Gender

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a writer, theme, issue, movement, or tradition involving literary representations of gender. Recent topic: "Dead Women Walking." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IG
  
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    EN 397 - Seminar in American Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a theme, issue, problem, or author in American literature. Recent topic: "The Book in America." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. IU
  
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    EN 398 - Intensive Independent Study (Post-1800)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and rigorous study of a literary theme, problem, or author after 1800. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 399 - Seminar in Literary Topics after 1800

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. A close and intensive study of a literary theme, problem, or author after 1800. Recent topics include, "Narcissistic Fiction" and "Blue Notes: The Literature of Jazz." Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    EN 400 - The Aperio Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intense experiential learning course in which a small group of students edit and prepare a manuscript or collection for publication. The work is then published in book form by Loyola's Apprentice House as part of the Aperio Series. Recent publications: an edition of Shakespeare's Measure for Measure and Music at the Crossroads: Lives and Legacies of Baltimore Jazz. By invitation only.
  
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    EN 405 - Capstone Project in American Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    As the capstone experience for the American Studies minor, each student develops an independent research project, internship, or service-based project, to be advised by two professors from different departments and presented at an end-of-year American Studies Symposium. The project constitutes the culmination of the student's work in American Studies and provides an opportunity for the student to bring together the perspectives of two different disciplines on a research area of particular interest. A project proposal must be submitted to and approved by the American Studies committee prior to registration for either the fall or spring semesters of senior year. The project must contain both a research and a formal writing component (the equivalent of a 20-25 page research paper). Written or electronic permission of the instructor. IU
  
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    EN 409 - Senior Honors Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, topic, or theme, the specifics of which will be determined by the instructor. Students are required to make extensive use of both primary and secondary materials. Recent topics include, "Modern Classic Revisions," "First Signifiers: How to Read the World," and "Literature of the American West." By invitation only.
  
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    EN 410 - Senior Honors Thesis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one EN 200-level core course. An intensive study of an author, topic, or theme, culminating in a written thesis and an oral defense. Students are expected to confront scholarship and do research at an advanced level. By invitation only.

Finance

  
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    FI 121 - Personal Financial Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Designed to allow students to develop a framework for planning and implementing a lifetime finance program. Investigates alternative personal financial decisions with a view toward optimizing personal wealth and creating more informed consumers. Students develop a personal financial plan. Topics include personal budgeting and planning and investment decisions with respect to education, automobiles, houses, securities, health and property insurance, retirement needs, and estate planning. Open to all majors as a general elective. Does not fulfill course requirements for the finance concentration.
  
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    FI 320 - Financial Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 201 , EC 102 .  Corequisite: EC 220 .  Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors. Studies the theory and practice of financial analysis and management in the corporate setting and its role in the larger economic environment. Students discuss what specific assets a firm should acquire, what total volume of funds should commit, and how the required funds of the firm should be financed. Topics include time value of money, risk and return relationships, fundamental valuation theories, financial markets, capital investment decisions, cost of capital, capital structure, dividend policy, and international finance.
  
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    FI 330 - Junior Analyst Class

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 320 . Restricted to sophomore business administration majors with a concentration in finance. Provides students with an introduction to the necessary tools and best practices to be a financial analyst. Key topics include how to utilize popular financial databases, reading and understanding financial statements, financial modelling, stock valuation using multiple techniques, how to prepare analyst reports, as well as how to present financial market research. Written or electronic permission of the instructor is required. (Spring only)
  
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    FI 335 - International Finance: Study Tour

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 320  or BH 320  may be taken concurrently. Corequisite:   Restricted to business administration majors with a cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. In a global market place, the need for a deep understanding of how to manage and account for transactions in various currencies and to protect against the fluctuations in the exchange rate is real for any sizable firm. This course provides an opportunity for students to gain a better understanding of topics such as the foreign exchange market, risk management and foreign currency hedging, financial accounting for derivatives instruments, and foreign currencies transactions and translation accounting. A 10-day study tour to China with site visits to global companies in Beijing and Shanghai is included. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. (Spring only)
  
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    FI 340 - Global Financial Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 320  or BH 320 . Corequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 . Provides students with a fundamental understanding of the international dimensions of corporate finance function. Students apply the concepts, approaches, and technology to support financial management in a multinational business environment. Topics include a detailed examination of foreign exchange markets, foreign exchange risk and its management, and international financial markets. GT (Fall only)
  
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    FI 380 - Fixed Income Securities: Valuation and Markets

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 320  or BH 320 . Provides students with a fundamental understanding of the pricing of bonds and operation of the bond market. Emphasis is placed on the various types of bonds and their characteristics and the risks associated with bonds. The mathematics of bond pricing and duration are also explored. The determination of interest rates, the behavior of interest rates, and the risk and term structure of interest rates are integral parts of the course. Additional topics include covenants, the effects of monetary policy, bond derivatives, and embedded options such as puts, calls, and conversion features. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    FI 381 - Equity Securities: Valuation and Markets

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 320  or BH 320 . Provides students with an introduction to the organization and functioning of equity markets, equity risk definition and measurement, financial theory, and models of equity valuation. The application of valuation models to market series, industries, and individual firms is also included. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    FI 426 - Special Topics in Finance

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Varies with topic. Provides students with specific seminars and/or research projects which address the outstanding topics in a particular field of finance. Students discuss the particular topics at an in-depth level. Potential topics encompass investments, real estate finance, international finance, financial management, capital markets, financial institutions, and financial modeling. Depending upon the topic, critical reviews of selected journal articles, guest lectures, empirical research, research projects and papers, as well as student presentations may be an integral part of the course. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    FI 430 - Financial Services Firms and Their Environments

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 380 , FI 381 . Provides an overview of financial services firms including commercial banks, savings banks, credit unions, insurance companies, mutual funds, securities firms, investment banks, and finance companies. Addresses operational issues within the financial services environment. Develops a framework for analyzing and measuring the risks faced by financial institutions by considering the environment in which these firms operate. Strategies and appropriate techniques that financial institutions can use to manage risk are also emphasized.
  
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    FI 431 - Derivative Securities and Markets

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 380 , FI 381 . Designed for students' understanding of derivative-related financial instruments such as forwards, futures, and options and the use of derivatives in investment and corporate financial management. An introduction to derivative security markets, the valuation of derivatives, derivative trading strategies, and the management of corporate risk with derivatives are covered.
  
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    FI 433 - Portfolio Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 380 , FI 381 . Restricted to seniors. An introduction to portfolio theory and management in the practical world that integrates students' knowledge of equity and fixed income valuation. Topics include portfolio strategies, futures and options, commodities, the Internet, and portfolio management under live market conditions.
  
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    FI 434 - Student Managed Sellinger Applied Portfolio Fund

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 380 , FI 381 . Exposes students to the portfolio management process through experiential learning. Students serve as portfolio and investment managers charged with managing the Sellinger Applied Portfolio Fund in a manner consistent with the core goals and philosophy of the Loyola University Maryland Endowment. Topics include asset valuation, constraint setting, asset allocation, asset selection, risk management, and performance evaluation. The behavioral aspects of finance are also considered. Students also gain experience with databases used by finance professionals. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    FI 440 - Financial Analysis and Valuation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 380 , FI 381  (may be taken concurrently). The assessment of business financial performance and valuation from the point of view of equity and credit analysts. Students learn to analyze a firm's profitability and risk by applying both financial and strategic analysis, prepare pro forma financial statements, ascertain the intrinsic value of a business, and apply spreadsheet models for financial decision making. (Fall only)
  
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    FI 441 - Advanced Financial Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 380 , FI 381 . The implementation of financial decisions and policies by using actual case situations. Students learn to apply the concepts and decision-making tools employed in effective financial decision making and increase their knowledge and understanding of the underlying theories of financial management. Through team case analysis and presentation, students develop analytical, communication, and interpersonal skills including the ability to identify and frame problems, recognize assumptions, and identify solution strategies. Students also develop the ability to speak effectively and persuasively, the capability to lead and motivate others, and the capacity to work effectively within a team. (Spring only)
  
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    FI 499 - Finance Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 380 , one FI 300- or 400-level course. Provides students with preparation for careers in finance through practical work experience, in-class personal development, and career planning. Through the onsite work requirement, students learn the application of financial theory to actual business problems. Additionally, in-class projects, on-site work requirements, an internship portfolio, and class presentations are an integral part of the course. Only one internship course may count toward graduation requirements.

Fine Arts

  
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    FA 496 - Environmental Studies Experience

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone experience in the environmental and sustainability studies minor, in which a student arranges an internship, independent study, or research experience with a faculty sponsor to engage in an in-depth exploration of a topic associated with environmental or sustainability issues. Written or electronic permission of a sponsoring faculty member and the environmental and sustainability studies director. Generally completed during the senior year. IES

French

  
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    FR 101 - Introductory French I

    (3.00 cr.)

    A thorough grounding in the four language skills: reading, listening comprehension, speaking, and writing, as well as an introduction to Francophone cultures and literatures. For students with no previous knowledge of the language. Cannot be taken for credit by students who have taken three years of French during high school. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    FR 102 - Introductory French II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of FR 101 . Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
 

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