2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Dec 01, 2020  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Economics/Business Economics

  
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    EC 497 - Independent Study in SAS for Economists

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 420  (may be taken concurrently). An independent laboratory course in the use of Statistical Analysis System (SAS). SAS is a statistical software package that is widely used throughout the government, business, industrial, scientific, and academic sectors. Proficiency in using SAS for data management, analysis, and reporting is developed. The focus is on developing SAS computer experience and extensive project work while reviewing business statistics and econometrics. Closed to students who have taken or plan to take ST 365 .
  
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    EC 498 - Economics Independent Study

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , EC 220 . Restricted to junior or senior business administration majors with a concentration in business economics, or economics majors, or business economics minors, or economics minors. An individual research project with an economics faculty member in a specific area of mutual interest. The student must begin with a written plan for the project and conclude with a written research report and presentation. Arrangements for supervision with a faculty member must be made prior to registration. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Ordinarily, no more than one independent study may be counted toward the major requirements.
  
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    EC 499 - Economics Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 103 , EC 220 . Restricted to juniors or seniors pursuing a B.A. in economics or a B.B.A. in business administration, business economics concentration. Provides students with preparation for careers in business, law and public policy through practical work experience, rigorous study of the economic theories related to the internship, and individual reflection for career planning. Ordinarily, interns spend approximately 10 hours per week at the internship site and spend additional time each week meeting with the faculty sponsor and producing the required academic components. Arrangements for supervision with a faculty member must be made prior to registration. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Only one internship course may count toward graduation requirements.

Education

  
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    ED 100 - Introduction to Education: School and Society

    (4.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to the role of education in today's multicultural world and their own academic disciplines. Topics include the historical and sociological foundations of education and implications for schooling our increasingly diverse population; principles of how children learn; ways schools can facilitate student achievement; and the impact of educational technology. Concurrent with readings and discussions, students learn through hands-on experience and interactions with K-12 pupils in communities and in schools. Prerequisite for all fieldwork.  A field experience in a school setting is required. Closed to students who have taken ED 101 .
  
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    ED 101 - Introduction to Urban Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Seeks to provide an overview of the complex issues that impact the development and maintenance of urban schools in the United States. More specifically, the course introduces students to a variety of frameworks through which they learn to examine the nature of urban schools, their historical development, their link to the social and political contexts, and perspectives of the people whose narratives define not only urban schools but also urban communities. Students analyze the formation, development, and current conditions of urban education from a number of different perspectives. This course also seeks to equip students with the ability to apply historical, theoretical, policy, and pedagogical analyses to contemporary issues in urban schools. Students are expected to use one or more analytical frames to analyze conditions in an urban school district in the United States. A field experience in a school setting is required. Closed to students who have taken ED 100 .
  
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    ED 202 - Child and Adolescent Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to elementary education majors. An in-depth review of theories and current issues involving the cognitive, social, and physical development of children and adolescents, with a particular emphasis on urban children. Students take part in a service-learning placement in an urban school.
  
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    ED 205 - Educational Psychology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to elementary education majors or secondary education minors. Explores major theories and principles of learning, motivation, and assessment. Focuses on the theoretical knowledge and the current research and their application to learning and teaching.
  
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    ED 206 - Elementary Mathematics Methods

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: MA 103 , MA 104 . Restricted to elementary education majors. Offers students an opportunity to observe and analyze mathematics instruction in an elementary setting, and focuses on the processes for planning, instructing, and assessing mathematics understanding such as problem solving, reasoning and proof, mathematical communication, mathematical connections, and representations. Students examine methods for teaching mathematics in upper elementary school. Mathematics content includes proportional reasoning, measurement, geometry, data analysis, and algebraic reasoning. A field experience in a school setting is required.
  
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    ED 324 - Substance Abuse and Its Effects in Adolescence

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to elementary education majors. An interdisciplinary service-learning course that addresses the biology and psychology of drug abuse and addiction among adolescents. Trains students (in teams of three) to teach a seven-hour unit on different drugs and their effects to middle school classes in Baltimore City. Sexual behaviors in the context of alcohol and other drug use are also addressed.
  
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    ED 340 - Seminar on Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to culturally relevant pedagogy, as well its foundations and extensions, and their applicability to all classrooms, whether in urban, suburban, rural, or private school settings. Students are expected to leave this course with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions indicative of a culturally relevant teacher. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    ED 344 - Race, Class, and Gender in Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores issues and images of race, class, and gender in urban schooling policies and practices. These structures are explored in order to demonstrate the ways in which they impact inequitable educational processes and outcomes for students, educational personnel, and communities. Students examine discourses around segregated schools, battles for desegregation, the "achievement gap", the "model minority" myth, single-sex education, Black boys in special education, and high poverty/high need schools. IAF
  
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    ED 378 - Politics of Urban School Reform

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides students with an understanding of the forces that shape urban school reform politics, policies, and practices. This course emphasizes the history of school reform in Baltimore, and recent political battles on school reform in Philadelphia, Washington, DC, and New Orleans, including urban educational policies and pedagogical practices. (Fall/Spring)

  
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    ED 404 - Internship I and Seminar (Elementary)

    (1.00 cr.)

    Restricted to elementary education majors with cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. Students teach lessons according to skills and techniques demonstrated during the methods courses. Includes observations and discussions of teaching in the professional development school setting. A passing score on Praxis I or its equivalent. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 416 - Elementary Social Studies Methods

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to elementary education majors. Studies the teaching of social studies from a developmental point of view. Methods and materials are presented for children in grades 1-6. Emphasizes inquiry approach of teaching and hands-on techniques.
  
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    ED 421 - Comprehensive Classroom Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: SE 496 . Restricted to elementary education majors or special education minors. Students develop the knowledge and skills to create and maintain a positive and engaging classroom environment that supports the cognitive and affective development of all learners. With an emphasis on self-awareness, the impact of culture and environment are explored as students examine the various models, theories, and principles of behavior management.  Course activities focus on the application of course content and the personal development of students as culturally responsive teachers who respond holistically to the diverse needs of their students. This class focuses on the use of positive behavioral supports through the emphasis of a strength-based classroom management/preparation plan that prevents behavior problems. Students demonstrate key components of an organized and well-managed classroom, including the ability to design innovative classrooms, develop rules and routines, and use positive behavioral supports effectively. Through the development of behavioral intervention plans, students use skills such as target behavior selection, measurement and recording techniques, strategies for increasing or decreasing behavior, evaluating plan effectiveness, and generalizing and maintaining desired behavior. Positive student-teacher relationships and the advocacy of prosocial behaviors, as well as topics such as bullying, school violence, and crisis management are addressed.
  
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    ED 422 - The Teaching of Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to science majors with a secondary education minor. Presents the general theory of education as applied to the teaching of science in grades 7-12. Consideration given to the selection and organization of content and the methods and the techniques associated with national and state standards for science instruction. One of the six methods courses is required for secondary school teachers by the Maryland State Department of Education.
  
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    ED 423 - The Teaching of English

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to secondary education minors and English majors. Presents the general theory of education as applied to the teaching of English in grades 7-12. Consideration given to the selection and organization of content and the methods and the techniques associated with national and state standards for English instruction. One of the six methods courses is required for secondary school teachers by the Maryland State Department of Education.
  
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    ED 424 - The Teaching of Social Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to history, global studies, or social science majors with a secondary education minor. Presents the general theory of education as applied to the teaching of social studies in grades 7-12. Consideration given to the selection and organization of content and the methods and the techniques associated with national and state standards for social studies instruction. One of the six methods courses is required for secondary school teachers by the Maryland State Department of Education.
  
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    ED 425 - The Teaching of Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to visual arts majors with a concentration in studio arts and a secondary education minor. Presents the general theory of education as applied to the teaching of art in grades PK-12. Consideration is given to the selection and organization of content, as well as the methods and techniques associated with the teaching of art. Written or electronic permission of the advisor.
  
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    ED 426 - The Teaching of Foreign Languages

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to French, German, or Spanish majors with a secondary education minor. Addresses the teaching guidelines and the expectations established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and the World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages. Students examine current methodologies, techniques, and educational goals for the teaching of foreign languages. Throughout the course, students develop lessons and activities that support an integrated foreign language program. Students also observe and evaluate foreign language classes. Students may also have opportunities to participate in classroom teaching. Maryland Core Learning Goals and Outcomes are introduced and reinforced along with InTASC standards. One of the six methods courses is required for secondary school teachers by the Maryland State Department of Education. Same course as ML 426 .
  
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    ED 427 - The Teaching of Mathematics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to mathematics majors with a secondary education minor. Presents the general theory of education as applied to the teaching of mathematics in grades 7-12. Consideration given to the selection and organization of content and the methods and the techniques associated with national and state standards for mathematics instruction. One of the six methods courses is required for secondary school teachers by the Maryland State Department of Education.
  
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    ED 428 - The Teaching of Music

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to fine arts majors with a music concentration and a secondary education minor. Presents the general theory of education as applied to the teaching of music in grades PK-12. Consideration is given to the selection and organization of content, as well as the methods and techniques associated with the teaching of music. One of the six methods courses is required for secondary school teachers by the Maryland State Department of Education.
  
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    ED 429 - Secondary Methods of Teaching

    (3.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: ED 434 . Restricted to juniors with a minor in secondary education or written permission of the instructor. Introduces students to the general concepts required to teach at the secondary level. Includes overviews of the context of secondary schools, issues in teaching and learning at the secondary level, culturally relevant and responsive pedagogies, unit and lesson planning, assessments, and classroom culture and management.
  
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    ED 431 - Field Experience in Education

    (1-2.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 100 . Corequisite:   Restricted to elementary education majors or secondary education minors. A school-based involvement in the educational process for three to four hours per week. Students work with children in the classroom in a variety of ways that include one-to-one instruction and small group teaching. They become acquainted with existing clerical support systems and media resources, and participate in the preparation of learning materials. Problems and techniques of classroom management are experienced in a realistic setting. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 432 - Internship I and Seminar (Secondary/Middle)

    (1.00 cr.)

    Restricted to seniors in the fall semester. Restricted to students with cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. The first phase of a two-semester internship in a specified area of certification. Interns observe, reflect, and begin to gain teaching experience in both a middle and a high school placement. They become acquainted with support systems, school climate, and resources in both placements as well as participate in the preparation of learning materials and in classroom instruction. Problems and techniques of classroom management are experienced in realistic settings. A passing score on Praxis I or its equivalent. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 433 - Internship II: Student Teaching (Secondary): Music

    (12.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 432 . Restricted to fine arts majors with a music concentration and a secondary education minor. Restricted to students with a cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. The second phase of the internship where interns continue to translate academic theory into practice in a professional development school (PDS). This phase of the internship lasts the entire semester and is split between an elementary and a secondary placement. Interns teach under the supervision of Loyola PDS coordinators and experienced mentor teachers. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 434 - Field Experience in Education (Secondary)

    (1-2.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 100  or ED 101 . Corequisite: ED 429 .  Restricted to secondary education minors. A school-based involvement in the educational process for three to four hours per week. Students work with children in the classroom in a variety of ways that include one-to-one instruction and small group teaching. Problems and techniques of classroom management are experienced in a realistic setting. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 435 - Internship II: Student Teaching (Secondary): Art

    (12.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 432 . Restricted to secondary education minors with cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. The second phase of the internship where interns continue to translate academic theory into practice in a professional development school (PDS). This phase of the internship lasts the entire semester and is split between an elementary and a secondary placement. Interns teach under the supervision of Loyola PDS coordinators and experienced mentor teachers. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 436 - Leadership Seminar I

    (1.00 cr.)

    Restricted to elementary education majors. The purpose of the course is to improve the effectiveness of student instructors of the Messina seminars. In addition to serving as student instructors and working with the seminar's faculty instructor, students attend training sessions, prepare readings on leadership in the context of Jesuit education, attend discussion sessions, and submit reflection papers. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Does not count toward graduation requirements. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 437 - Leadership Seminar II

    (1.00 cr.)

    Restricted to elementary education majors. The purpose of the course is to improve the effectiveness of student instructors of the Messina seminars. In addition to serving as student instructors and working with the seminar's faculty instructor, students attend training sessions, prepare readings on leadership in the context of Jesuit education, attend discussion sessions, and submit reflection papers. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Does not count toward graduation requirements. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 438 - Field Experience: Special Education (Elementary)

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: SE 496 . Restricted to elementary education majors or special education minors. A school-based involvement in special education for three or four hours per week. Students work with children in the classroom in a variety of ways, including one-on-one instruction and small group teaching. They become acquainted with resources and participate in the preparation of learning materials. Problems and techniques of classroom management are experienced in a realistic setting. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 439 - Field Experience: Special Education (Secondary)

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: SE 496 . Restricted to secondary education minors or special education minors. A school-based involvement in special education for three or four hours per week. Students work with children in the classroom in a variety of ways, including one on-one instruction and small group teaching. They become acquainted with resources and participate in the preparation of learning materials. Problems and techniques of classroom management are experienced in a realistic setting. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 440 - Field Experience: Reading (Elementary)

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: RE 344 . Restricted to elementary education majors. A school-based involvement in reading for three hours per week. Students work with children in the classroom in a variety of ways, including one-on-one instruction and small group teaching. They become acquainted with resources and participate in the preparation of learning materials. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 441 - Special Topics in Education

    (2-3.00 cr.)

    Examines one or more issues in education, including urban education, teaching bilingual learners, involving families in their children's education, and gender specific issues and solutions. Relevant topics are explored using case studies, current research materials, and classroom experiences. Depending on the needs of the topic, part of the class may be field-based.
  
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    ED 442 - Methods of Teaching Science with Field Experience

    (4.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 116  and PH 117 , or written permission of the department chair. Academic, laboratory, field-oriented, and practical experiences designed to blend the educational principles of science teaching with science content in an active, student-centered learning environment. Focus is on pedagogical issues in science education for elementary students and includes field-based exercises, assigned readings, long-term observation projects, curriculum analyses, classroom field trips and observations, outdoor field trips, and nature center visits.
  
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    ED 443 - Field Experience: Special Education

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: SE 496 . Restricted to students who are not elementary education majors or secondary education minors. A school-based involvement in special education for three or four hours per week. Students work with children in the classroom in a variety of ways, including one-on-one instruction and small group teaching. They become acquainted with resources and participate in the preparation of learning materials. Problems and techniques of classroom management are experienced in a realistic setting. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 445 - Elementary Internship II and Seminar

    (12.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Completion of major coursework and ED 404 . Corequisite: ED 446 .

     

      Restricted to elementary education majors with cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. Students continue their intensive yearlong internship in this closely supervised, full-time experience in a professional development school. During this second phase, students gradually assume all of the responsibilities of their cooperating teacher. Seminars are held on a regular basis, and topics focus on concerns relevant to the beginning teacher. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)

  
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    ED 446 - Capstone in Elementary Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: ED 445 . Restricted to elementary education majors. Focuses on four areas of education: pedagogy, theory enacted in practice, diversity, and professional growth and development. It is taught in conjunction with the 12-hour internship at a professional development school.
  
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    ED 452 - Internship II: Student Teaching (Secondary): Science

    (12.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 432 . Restricted to science majors with a secondary education minor and a cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. The second phase of the internship where interns continue to translate academic theory into practice in a professional development school (PDS). This phase of the internship lasts the entire semester and is split between a middle and a high school placement. Interns teach under the supervision of Loyola PDS coordinators and experienced mentor teachers. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 453 - Internship II: Student Teaching (Secondary): English

    (12.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 432 . Restricted to English majors with a secondary education minor and a cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. The second phase of the internship where interns continue to translate academic theory into practice in a professional development school (PDS). This phase of the internship lasts the entire semester and is split between a middle and a high school placement. Interns teach under the supervision of Loyola PDS coordinators and experienced mentor teachers. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 454 - Internship II: Student Teaching (Secondary): Mathematics

    (12.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 432 . Restricted to mathematics majors with a secondary education minor and a cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. The second phase of the internship where interns continue to translate academic theory into practice in a professional development school (PDS). This phase of the internship lasts the entire semester and is split between a middle and a high school placement. Interns teach under the supervision of Loyola PDS coordinators and experienced mentor teachers. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 455 - Internship II: Social Studies (Secondary)

    (12.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 432 . Restricted to history, global studies, or social science majors with a secondary education minor and a cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. The second phase of the internship where interns continue to translate academic theory into practice in a professional development school (PDS). This phase of the internship lasts the entire semester and is split between a middle and a high school placement. Interns teach under the supervision of Loyola PDS coordinators and experienced mentor teachers. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 456 - Internship II: Student Teaching (Secondary): Modern Language

    (12.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 432 . Restricted to French, German, or Spanish majors with a secondary education minor and a cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. The second phase of the internship where interns continue to translate academic theory into practice in a professional development school (PDS). This phase of the internship lasts the entire semester and is split between an elementary and a secondary placement. Interns teach under the supervision of Loyola PDS coordinators and experienced mentor teachers. Students are responsible for transportation to school site. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    ED 463 - Independent Study in Education

    (1-6.00 cr.)

    Individual projects geared to specific needs or interests of students. Specific requirements related to each independent study approved on an individual basis. Written or electronic permission of the advisor and the department chair.
  
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    ED 464 - Qualitative Approaches to Urban Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to elementary education majors. Examines various qualitative approaches to urban education including participant observation, informal interviews, life history, and archival research. Encourages learning about the contributions and limitations of qualitative inquiry through a series of assignments based upon firsthand experiences completed in the local Baltimore community. Student completion of a major project is required.
  
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    ED 465 - Social Foundations in Urban Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 100  or ED 101 . Examines the relationship between schools and society. The purposes and functions of urban schooling are examined in economic, sociological, historical, and political context. Students analyze the complexities of teaching and learning in urban schools and examine how urban schools throughout the United States can be structurally and pedagogically transformed. Through an exploration of the scholarly fields (history, philosophy, law, sociology, and anthropology), the social foundations of American education are surveyed. Students explore the dynamic interplay among dominant ideology, political economy, and changes in American public schooling since its inception. Special attention is given to the relationship between democracy and urban schooling. Twenty hours of an introductory field experience is required.
  
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    ED 466 - Language, Culture, and Literacy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the intersection of language, culture, policy, and practice. Students explore sociocultural and sociopolitical facets of language and language use, such as ideology, identity, language change, official language, variations, dialects, and classroom discourse. Particularly, the history and impact of linguicism, or linguistic discrimination, in- and outside of school settings are considered. Students learn methods to assist linguistically diverse students in extending their literacy abilities by cultivating a learning environment that celebrates and draws upon their cultural funds of knowledge and communities of practice. IAF
  
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    ED 467 - Sociocultural Context of Learning and Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: ED 100  or ED 101 . Examines learning, teaching, and scholastic development from a sociocultural theoretical perspective that includes situated learning theory and activity theory. It examines learning achievement and social development of children and youth in culturally, linguistically, and ethnically diverse educational settings. The theme of this examination is that that people learn, achieve, and develop as participants in cultural communities. Using the theoretical frameworks of sociocultural theory, situated learning theory, and activity theory, students develop an understanding of schools as cultural communities and social environments. This understanding is applied to interpreting the personal and scholastic development in young people in diverse settings, and examines those practices that promote the development of literacy, numeracy, and other academic proficiencies, as well as the identity formation of young people in these settings. Using the case of the African American and Latino experience in the United States, the course offers a systematic account of socialization and cultural practices necessary for achievement and full development of all learners of culturally, linguistically, and ethnically diverse backgrounds.

Engineering

  
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    EG 031 - Linear Circuit Analysis Lab

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: EG 331 . Laboratory course that accompanies and enhances the learning objectives of EG 331 . Ohm's law, Kirchhoff's laws, equivalent circuits, and linear analysis theorems/techniques are reinforced by building and testing physical circuits. The transient response and steady-state response of fundamental first- and second-order circuits are measured and explored. Use of common electrical laboratory equipment, laboratory safety protocols, error analysis, and technical writing are also addressed.
  
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    EG 032 - Electronics Lab

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: EG 432 . A laboratory course that accompanies EG 432 . Experiments involve the characteristics and applying operational amplifiers, measuring I-V characteristics of semiconductor diodes, using diodes as wave shapers, measuring MOSFET characteristic curves, measuring MOSFET performance as a voltage amplifier, measuring BJT characteristic curves, and other selected topics.
  
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    EG 051 - Materials Science Lab

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: EG 130  or EG 140 ; EG 351 . A laboratory course that accompanies EG 351 . Students perform hands-on experiments and/or analyses of experimental data that help visualize and reinforce basic materials science concepts. Topics include crystallography; mechanical properties determination and computer-based material property correlations; phase diagrams/solidification structures; viscosity of household fluids; and the effect of temperature on deformation/fracture behavior of materials. Emphasizes analysis of results and developing conclusions in response to questions in written laboratory exercises.
  
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    EG 071 - Digital Logic Laboratory

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: EG 471 . Includes experiments on basic logic gates; combinatorial logic design; N-bit adder circuits; flip flops; sequential logic design and implementation of state machines; special counters and registers; and introduction to field programmable gate array (FPGA) design. Electronic circuit design software is used to aid the design and simulation of the circuits.
  
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    EG 101 - Introduction to Engineering

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to engineering as a discipline and a profession. The processes of design, creative problem solving, and innovation to benefit society are studied using case studies, readings, discussions, teamwork, design contests, and student workbooks. Emphasis is given to the historical and societal contexts of engineering design and its impact on our society for computer, electrical, mechanical, and materials engineering. Skills necessary for success such as creativity, teamwork, and communication are developed. Introductions to the tools and requirements of the four engineering degree concentrations are provided. Open to majors and nonmajors. Engineering majors may substitute EG 495  and other courses as approved by the department chair. Fulfills the second natural science core requirement. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    EG 103 - Engineering and Society: Engineering, Design, and Creative Problem Solving in the Built World

    (3.00 cr.)

    The pyramids and Gothic cathedrals as well as transportation, communication, and sanitation systems are just some examples of our engineered world. Students explore what makes engineering unique from the sciences-the elements of design and creative problem-solving. Emphasis is given to the historical and social contents of engineering design and its impact on our society. Students also explore the connections engineering has to visual thinking-graphic and industrial design. Open to majors and nonmajors. Engineering majors may substitute EG 495  or another course with the approval of the department chair. Fulfills the second natural science core requirement. (Fall only)
  
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    EG 120 - MATLAB Tools for Engineering and Science

    (1.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the MATLAB environment intended for beginning users. Topics include working with the MATLAB user interface; entering commands and creating variables; analyzing vectors and matrices; visualizing; vector and matrix data; and writing programs with logic and flow control. No prior programming experience required.
  
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    EG 130 - Spreadsheet Tools for Engineering and Science

    (1.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the use of spreadsheets for logging, organizing, graphing, and presenting data. Statistical analysis, curve fitting, and solutions to equations are considered. Engineering and scientific problems are addressed through lectures, demonstrations, and the use of spreadsheets in a computer laboratory.
  
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    EG 140 - Programming Tools for Engineering and Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to programming through multiple environments, utilizing manual and automated data entry, to analyze engineering problems, and present analyzed data in tabular and graphical formats. Students use spreadsheet tools and programming environments through Excel, Python, and MATLAB for data collection and analysis of engineering problems related to programming logic, probability and statistics, and vector and matrix analysis. Required for engineering majors.
  
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    EG 301 - Statics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: MA 251 , PH 201 . Engineering mechanics treatment of rigid bodies at rest or moving at constant velocity. Covers force vectors, equilibrium of a particle, force system resultants, equilibrium of a rigid body, simple structural analysis, internal forces, friction, center of gravity and centroid, and moments of inertia.
  
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    EG 302 - Dynamics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 301 , MA 252 . Engineering mechanics treatment of accelerated rigid bodies. Covers kinematics and kinetics of a particle and planar kinematics and kinetics of a rigid body. Includes work and energy methods and impulse and momentum considerations.
  
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    EG 320 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory

    (2.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 051 , EG 351 . Corequisite: EG 390 , EG 420 . A lecture-laboratory course providing an empirical and theoretical foundation for selected topics in the mechanics of materials. Includes mechanical properties testing techniques; elastic and plastic deformation; stress and strain measurement; stress concentration; buckling; simple mechanical design; and reinforcement of best practices in experimentation.
  
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    EG 331 - Linear Circuit Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: MA 252 , PH 202  or written permission of the instructor. MA 252  may be taken concurrently with written permission of the department chair. Corequisite: EG 031 . Basic techniques of lumped-parameter circuit analysis are presented. Signal waveforms, electrical element models, and Kirchoff's laws are exercised. Mesh equations, node equations, and techniques based on the properties of circuit linearity are used extensively. The utility of Norton and Thevenin equivalent circuits, proportionality, and superposition are presented. The transient and steady-state responses of second-order energy storage circuits are explored. The course concludes with sinusoidal steady-state analysis and the role of phasors in circuit analysis.
  
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    EG 333 - Signals and Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 031 , EG 331 . An introduction to the underlying concepts found in the study of signal processing, communications, control theory, electromagnetics, etc. Fundamental mathematical models and properties for both continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems are presented. Properties of discrete and continuous linear time-invariant systems are presented. Analysis techniques and properties of the Fourier series and the Fourier transform for discrete-time and continuous- time signals are explored in detail.
  
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    EG 351 - Introduction to Engineering Materials

    (3.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: EG 051 . Covers fundamentals of materials science, including bonding, crystal structure, x-ray diffraction, mechanical behavior, defects in solids, phase diagrams, phase transformations, and electrical behavior. Emphasizes the properties of ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers, and composites and their engineering applications.
  
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    EG 360 - Object-Oriented Engineering Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    The study of objects and object-oriented programming as used to produce solutions to modern day computer engineering problems. Topics include TCP/IP communications, inter-process communications, GUI design, database interfaces, and engineering design best practices.
  
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    EG 380 - Thermodynamics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: MA 251 , PH 201 . Examines the relationships among heat, work, and various other forms of energy in engineering applications. Covers thermodynamic systems, property evaluation, phase changes, equations of state, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, the Carnot cycle, entropy, and power and refrigeration cycles.
  
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    EG 381 - Probability and Statistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: MA 252 . Random experiments, probability, random variables, probability density functions, expectation, descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and simple linear regression. Degree credit will not be given for more than one of EG 381 or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 . Same course as ST 381 . IFS (Fall only)
  
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    EG 390 - Experimental Methods

    (2.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 031 ; EG 130  or EG 140 ; MA 351 . A lecture-laboratory course covering the fundamentals of engineering experimentation and experimental design including data acquisition and analysis. Emphasizes standardization, uncertainty analysis, widely used measurement sensors, and engineering report preparation.
  
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    EG 420 - Solid Mechanics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 301 , EG 351 . Corequisite: EG 320 . Engineering mechanics treatment of deformable solid bodies. Covers stress, strain, mechanical properties of materials, axial load, torsion, bending, transverse shear, combined loadings, stress and strain transformations, and theories of failure.
  
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    EG 421 - Fluid Mechanics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 301 , MA 252 . Examines fluids at rest and in motion in engineering applications. Covers fluid statics; kinematics and dynamics of inviscid and viscous fluid flows; integral continuity, momentum, and energy analyses; boundary layers; turbulence; scale modeling and similitude; conduit flows; simple turbomachinery; and lift and drag.
  
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    EG 422 - Heat and Mass Transfer

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 380 , MA 304 . Examines heat and mass transfer in engineering applications. Covers steady-state and transient conduction, internal and external convection, radiation transfer, heat exchanger design, and heat and mass transfer analogies.
  
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    EG 423 - Engineering Materials and Manufacturing Processes

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 051 , EG 351 . Covers the major methods of shaping and treating engineering materials to optimize their use. Examines metal casting, glass-working, polymer processing, composite materials and assembly, powder metallurgy forming, bulk deformation shaping, sheet metal forming, and machining operations. Introduces the origin and avoidance of manufacturing defects.
  
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    EG 424 - Mechanical Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 302 , EG 420 . The application of the mechanics of materials and other engineering principles to the design of mechanical elements. Covers deflection and impact, failure criteria, safety factors and reliability, fatigue, and design of various mechanical elements such as shafts, rolling-element bearings, gears, belts, springs, threaded fasteners, clutches, brakes, and chains.
  
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    EG 426 - Computer-Aided Simulation and Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 420 . The design of mechanical elements and assemblies using computer-based drafting and simulation tools. Covers three-dimensional solid computer model development and applied finite-element analysis. Emphasizes the creation of detailed design drawings and professional design documentation, as well as the application of computer-aided design (CAD) tools during the engineering design process.
  
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    EG 429 - Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selected special topics in mechanical engineering such as applied computational fluid dynamics, mechanics of structures, or thermal systems design. Written or electronic permission of the department chair. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    EG 432 - Electronics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 031 , EG 331 . Corequisite: EG 032 . An introduction to the theory of operation of active components. Active components introduced include operational amplifiers, diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). Structure, physical operation, current-voltage characteristics, small-signal operation, basic amplifier configurations, and biasing of amplifier circuits for MOSFETs and BJTs are presented. Fundamental concepts of semiconductor physics are also discussed.
  
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    EG 441 - Engineering Systems Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 381 . Considers complete system life cycle engineering issues. Introduces the use of mathematical models to analyze and optimize real world systems. Studies deterministic systems, microeconomics, forecasting, and reliability and decision analyses. Case studies and projects may be used.
  
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    EG 452 - Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Materials

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 051 , EG 351 . Studies the electrical properties of conductors and semiconductors, including the quantum mechanical basis of modern electronic devices. Develops the magnetic and optical properties of modern materials and their applications.
  
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    EG 453 - Structure of Solids

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 051 , EG 351 . Covers properties of x-rays, crystallography, and x-ray diffraction. Develops understanding of x-ray equipment. Laboratory techniques in x-ray diffraction and analysis are treated along with applications to crystal structure characterizations.
  
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    EG 454 - Mechanical Properties of Materials

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 051 , EG 351 . Covers stress-strain relationships for materials, crystallographic aspects of plastic deformation, dislocation theory, fracture, and materials testing techniques.
  
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    EG 455 - Transformations in Solids

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 051 , EG 351 , EG 380 . Covers equilibrium multicomponent systems and their phase diagrams, transport phenomena, and nucleation and growth processes.
  
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    EG 459 - Special Topics in Materials Engineering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selected special topics in materials engineering such as failure analysis, microstructural characterization, or steel metallurgy. Written or electronic permission of the department chair. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    EG 471 - Digital Logic

    (3.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: EG 071 . Number systems, logic gates, integrated circuits, combinatorial logic design, flip flops, registers, and the design of logic circuits. Emphasizes state machines and state diagrams. Applications are taken from large digital systems in general and digital computer systems in particular. Logic design specification using a high-level descriptor language and implementation using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are introduced.
  
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    EG 474 - Introduction to Microprocessor-Based Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 071 , EG 360  (may be taken concurrently), EG 471 . The design and organization of a modern microprocessor. Covers hardware topics such as memory addressing, data registers, instruction execution, the stack pointer, the arithmetic logic unit, and interrupts. Assemblers, editors, and simulation and debug software are used to explore the instruction set and addressing modes of a reduced instruction set computer (RISC). This course contains elements of assembly language programming include the structure of data and algorithm implementation. Introduction to embedded systems design through programming in the C language and interfacing to actual hardware. Programming assignments and a course project are carried out on a 32-bit microprocessor.
  
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    EG 475 - FPGA Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 071 , EG 471 . Explores digital systems design with Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), design and synthesis of reconfigurable logic with high-level descriptor languages, logic design using FPGAs, and architectural and systems design issues. This course also serves as an introduction to FPGA security issues.
  
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    EG 476 - Electronic Digital Circuits

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 371 ; or EG 071 , EG 331 , EG 432 , EG 471 . Design and testing of complex sequential state machines including machine controllers, modulator/demodulator circuits and CPUs using HDL. Design and testing of several 8-bit multipliers, binary to decimal converters, a CISC CPU, several RISC CPUs, a microcontroller with microprogramming as a controller for a RISC CPU and a CISC CPU, methods to implement hardware for parallel processing, and a wide variety of CPU interrupt structures. Also included are introductions to FPGAs, machine-to-machine communications, using the OSI model. Same course as CS 476 .
  
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    EG 478 - Computer Architecture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CS 371 ; or EG 071 , EG 360 , EG 471 . Design and understanding of the computer system as a whole unit. Performance evaluation and its role in computer system design; instruction set architecture design, datapath design, and optimizations (e.g., ALU); control design; single cycle, multiple cycle, and pipeline implementations of processor; hazard detection and forwarding; memory hierarchy design; and cache memories, virtual memory, peripheral devices, and input/output. Same course as CS 471 .
  
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    EG 479 - Special Topics in Computer Engineering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selected special topics in computer engineering such as computer interfacing, programmable logic devices, or computer system design. Written or electronic permission of the department chair. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    EG 481 - Communications

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 333 . Corequisite: EG 381 . Analog and digital communications systems: characterization of communication channels, bandwidth, and signal distortion; developing modulation and demodulation techniques (amplitude, frequency, phase modulation, and pulse code); ASK, FSK, PSK, PCM, and delta modulation; sample and hold, source encoding, matched filtering, digital modulations, and error control coding.
  
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    EG 483 - Control Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 331 , MA 351  . Analysis and design of feedback control systems. Examples are drawn from electrical and mechanical systems as well as other engineering fields. Mathematical modeling of systems, stability criteria, root-locus, and frequency domain design methods. The design material introduced in the lectures is supported both by computer-aided and hands-on exercises.
  
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    EG 485 - Digital Signal Processing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 333 . Corequisite: EG 381 . Sampling and quantization of continuous-time signals. Signal representation in the time domain and frequency domain, discrete-time systems, discrete-time convolution, discrete-time Fourier transform, fast Fourier transforms, digital filter design, and z-transform. MATLAB exercises on simulating and designing digital filters.
  
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    EG 487 - Electromagnetics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 331 , MA 351 . Provides an introduction to electromagnetic fields and waves. Electrostatic fields in free space, magnetostatic fields in free space, and transmission lines are discussed. Specific topics include Coulomb's law, electric potential, Biot-Savart law, Ampere's law, time-varying electromagnetic fields, transient transmission lines, and transmission lines at sinusoidal steady-state.
  
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    EG 489 - Special Topics in Electrical Engineering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Selected special topics in electrical engineering such as image processing, wireless communications, or control theory. Written or electronic permission of the department chair. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    EG 490 - Forensic Studies Experience

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone experience in forensic studies in which a student may arrange an internship, independent study, or research experience with a faculty sponsor to engage in an in-depth exploration of a topic associated with forensic or criminal investigation. Generally completed during senior year; students should secure a faculty sponsor and obtain the approval of the forensic studies director by the end of junior year. Written or electronic permission of a sponsoring faculty member. IFS
  
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    EG 491 - Technical Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of innovation and entrepreneurship. Introduces theoretical frameworks and examples of issues, skills, and challenges of innovating in the fields of science and engineering. Establishes multidisciplinary skill sets for creating and managing technology-based entrepreneurship. Includes idea generation evaluation, intellectual property, teamwork, business plans, financing through private and public sources, developing and marketing products, and legal issues. Includes a semester-long group project with a faculty and/or industrial mentor. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Same course as CS 491  and PH 491 .
  
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    EG 495 - Engineering Research

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Prior to the course, a proposal is required that defines the nature and the scope of the research, as well as a plan for executing the research. A research notebook, progress reports, and a final research paper are required. Written or electronic permission of a sponsoring faculty member. May not be used as the 300- or 400-level engineering elective. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    EG 497 - Engineering Design Project I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 390  and at least one EG 400-level concentration elective. The first half of the senior design project requiring individual demonstrations of capability in engineering design, teamwork, and project management skills. Includes definition of a problem statement relevant to societal needs, creation and evaluation of design alternatives, and the generation of detailed design and performance specifications. Requires an oral presentation to the Industrial Advisory Board and the department, a technical paper proposal, a project webpage, and a Gantt chart for the second semester. Project teams are limited to three to five students.
  
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    EG 498 - Engineering Design Project II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EG 497 . The second half of the senior capstone design project requiring the application of project engineering tools and the realization, testing, and characterization of the project. Includes manufacturing and testing the project; using a Gantt chart, workbook, and data analysis; controlling funds against a budget; developing lessons learned and projections of next steps; giving an oral presentation to the Industrial Advisory Board and faculty; and creating a summary paper and webpage that describe the project and its results.
  
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    EG 499 - Engineering Internship

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    An external engineering work experience requiring supervised work in an engineering environment. Requires an engineering instructor sponsor. Requires a daily log of work experiences, a final report to the engineering instructor sponsor, and a performance evaluation by the work-place supervisor. Credits are nominally based on work hours: 40 hours minimum for 1 credit, 80 hours minimum for 2 credits, and 160 hours minimum for 3 credits, Written or electronic permission of the department chair. Does not count toward graduation requirement. May be repeated for credit.

English

  
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    EN 090 - English Internships (50 Hours)

    (1.00 cr.)

    Internships give students an opportunity for hands-on experience in career fields such as publishing, public relations, advertising, journalism, and law. Students must document at least 50 hours of work at the internship site over the course of the semester and will be periodically evaluated by their supervisor(s). Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Internships may be paid or unpaid. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. May be repeated for nondegree credit only. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    EN 097 - English Internships in Public Schools

    (3.00 cr.)

    Qualified juniors and seniors may enrich their education by teaching English in a public school. Interns ordinarily are English majors, have completed at least six upper-division courses, and have a QPA of at least 3.000. During the internship semester, they spend 10 hours per week in a public school, working closely with a mentor who is an experienced teacher, under the supervision of the school's English department. Interns are responsible for keeping journals, meeting regularly with the internship coordinator, and producing a final reflection on the internship experience. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. These internships are limited to Baltimore-area public schools, during the fall or spring semester only. Students are advised to begin preparing for the internship at least one month prior to registration during the semester before the internship takes place.
 

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