2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Dec 01, 2020  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

French

  
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    FR 103 - Intermediate French I

    (3.00 cr.)

    A systematic consolidation and expansion of the four basic skills: reading, listening comprehension, speaking, and writing. To increase students' proficiency in the language and broaden their understanding of Francophone cultures and literatures. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    FR 104 - Intermediate French II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone course reviewing and reinforcing language skills learned in FR 101-103 to help students attain intermediate level as defined by ACTFL guidelines in the five skills: reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, and culture of France and the Francophone world. Course includes use of the language in context, with authentic readings, discussion in French, and film clips. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    FR 161 - Comprehensive Beginning French

    (6.00 cr.)

    A review course for students who have had three years of language study in high school and for students who wish to begin a second modern language. The material covered is essentially the same as for the FR 101-102 sequence, except that it is covered in one semester instead of two. This includes a thorough grounding in the five language skills: reading, listening, speaking, writing, and cultural knowledge, as well as an understanding of the structure of the language, cultures, and literatures of the countries that speak French. Special emphasis is placed on preparing students to begin work at the intermediate language level. Open to students who wish to begin study in a second modern language or who place into FR 102 . Contact time includes six 50-minute class sessions per week. Counts as two, three-credit courses. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required. Required for students who have completed three years of high school French, who wish to continue language study in French, and who place into FR 101 . Closed to students who have taken FR 101 , FR 102 , or the equivalent.
  
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    FR 162 - Comprehensive Intermediate French

    (6.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed FR 102  or FR 161  or placed into FR 103 . The material covered is essentially the same as for the FR 103-FR 104 sequence, except that it is covered in one semester instead of two. It consists of a systematic consolidation and expansion of the four basic skills: reading, understanding, speaking, and writing. To increase and perfect students' acquired abilities/proficiencies in the language and broaden their understanding of Francophone cultures and literatures, the second half is a capstone reviewing and reinforcing language skills to help students attain intermediate level as defined by ACTFL guidelines in the five skills: reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, and culture. The course includes the use of the language in context-with authentic readings, discussion in French, and film clips. Counts as two, three-credit courses. Contact time includes six 50-minute class sessions per week. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required. Closed to students who have taken FR 103 , FR 104 , or the equivalent.
  
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    FR 201 - French Composition and Conversation I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 104  or FR 162 . Develops writing and speaking ability in French through models of style, related grammar, composition exercises, and the World Wide Web. Comprehension and speaking are developed through the use of cinema, music, conversation, and other developing technologies.
  
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    FR 202 - The Living Language

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 . A transition between language study on the lower-division to more advanced upper-division courses. Focuses on special topics, cultural events, and cultural issues. Media, such as television and the Internet, are accessed and used through state-of-the-art technology.
  
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    FR 205 - Living and Working in the French Caribbean Today

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 104  or FR 162 . Restricted to students studying in Guadeloupe. A volunteer and language immersion course offered in Baltimore and Guadeloupe, France. Students spend three weeks living with local families on the island of Marie Galante, part of the French overseas department of Guadeloupe, to organize and run volunteer activities in one of the island's small underprivileged communities. Participants apply their knowledge of French and other academic disciplines to real life situations as they live with and help a Creole French community. Coursework includes readings by writers from Guadeloupe such as Gisèle Pineau, Maryse Condé, and Jean Juraver. Students also conduct interviews with locals and plan, script, and film a short documentary. Organized in collaboration with the Office Municipal de la Culture et des Sports de Capesterre. May be taken in either French (FR) or English (ML). IAF/IL
  
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    FR 210 - French Composition and Conversation II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 . Develops and refines written expression through a review of complex grammatical structures and idiomatic expressions. Students practice guided compositions and creative writing using factual reporting techniques and literary models.
  
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    FR 216 - Introduction to French Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 . Students are prepared to take advanced literature classes. By reading and analyzing plays, poems, and short novels, students improve their ability to read and comprehend literary texts in French. To better understand the context in which the literary texts studied were written, the course also introduces students to literary history. Through vocabulary acquisition, introduction to basic literary terms and genres, grammar review, and analysis and discussion of literary themes, students improve their speaking, reading, writing, and analytical skills in French. Writing assignments are keyed to the course readings and are designed to teach students both American and French styles of analyzing and critiquing literary texts, as well as how to conduct secondary research.
  
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    FR 303 - France Today

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 . A study of the evolution of France since 1980 with emphasis on political, social, intellectual, and artistic issues. Includes various analyses of the role of France on the international scene and particularly as a member of the European Union. Students study articles drawn from the French press, recent films, and current French television news.
  
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    FR 304 - Introduction to Francophone Cultures

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 . Introduces students to Francophone cultures outside of the hexagone and provides them with an historical overview of the international context of Francophonie. Topics include Negritude, cultural métissage, the dialogue between tradition and modernity, independence, postcolonial disillusionment, and the status of women in a changing society. IAF
  
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    FR 305 - Living and Working in the French Caribbean Today

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 . Restricted to students studying in Guadeloupe. A volunteer and language immersion course offered in Baltimore and Guadeloupe, France. Students spend three weeks living with local families on the island of Marie Galante, part of the French overseas department of Guadeloupe, to organize and run volunteer activities in one of the island's small underprivileged communities. Participants apply their knowledge of French and other academic disciplines to real life situations as they live with and help a Creole French community. Coursework includes readings by writers from Guadeloupe such as Gisèle Pineau, Maryse Condé, and Jean Juraver. Upper-level students complete additional coursework, including one of the following: filming a documentary complete with its transcription and subtitles, writing a paper that investigates a social problem related to the course's community service project, or creating a business plan for a small sustainable enterprise in Guadeloupe. Organized in collaboration with the Office Municipal de la Culture et des Sports de Capesterre. IAF/IL
  
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    FR 306 - The Reel Thing: French New Wave Cinema

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 . Focuses on the works of French filmmakers Truffaut, Godard, Chabrol, Rivette, and Resnais who rebelled against the conventionality of their predecessors. This new generation of filmmakers sought to establish the notion of director as author. Students study the esthetic, thematic, and theoretical aspects of their works from 1958 to 1964.
  
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    FR 310 - Business French: A Functional Approach

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 . Geared to students interested in acquiring functional language skills in the world of French business and business cultural competence. Students study the economic and business environment, and learn key technical terms and useful idiomatic expressions. Stresses the rules and formulas of formal business correspondence. Upon completion of this course, students may take the test given by the Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry to obtain the Diplôme de Français des Affaires, 1e degré (DFA1).
  
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    FR 330 - Introduction to Francophone Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . An introduction to the literatures and cultures of several French speaking countries or regions including Morocco, Algeria, Senegal, Zaire, Lebanon, Quebec, Switzerland, and Belgium. Authors studied may include Tahar Ben Jelloun, Leopold Sedar Senghor, Mbala Ngombo, Georges Schehade, Kateb Yacine, Michel Tremblay, Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz, and Emile Verhaeren. IAF
  
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    FR 331 - Savoring Francophone Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Through the lens of gastronomy, students are introduced to the literature and cultures of several Francophone countries or regions, including Algeria, Cameroun, Guadeloupe, Reunion Island, and Senegal. The course explores how food is used in novels as a vehicle to discuss topics such as childhood, relationships, politics, history, and social issues. Taught in French.
  
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    FR 332 - Trauma and Testimony

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Examines representations of the 1994 genocide of the Tutsis in Rwanda in a variety of literary genres (autobiographical testimony, novels, short stories, poetry, essays, and graphic novels), as well as the visual media (film, interviews, and photos). Students examine how the particularities of each genre allow authors to testify of trauma in different ways. Taught in French. IPJ
  
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    FR 333 - Caribbean Identities in Movement

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216  or written permission of the instructor. Examines dynamic shifts in Francophone Caribbean literature, culture, and identity throughout the twentieth century. This course analyses the particularities of the Indigénisme, Négritude, Créolité. and Antillanité movements. Moreover, it explores how major themes in Francophone Caribbean literature—including colonization, slavery, abolition, racism, commemoration, cultural belonging, linguistic tensions, Creole resistance, and ecology—inform Caribbean identity today. IL
  
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    FR 334 - French Film in Context

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Analyzes the history of French film in relationship to the evolution of France since 1895. From the works of Méliès and the Lumière brothers to the contemporary performances of actor Fabrice Luchini, the evolution of French film helps characterize key turning points in French society and history. Students analyze how important French films and directors represented and addressed issues of their time while benefiting from new technologies and narrative structures. IF
  
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    FR 340 - The Text and the Screen

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Analyzes the relationship between text, film, sound, and images by studying masterpieces of French cinema, as well as masterpieces of French literature and their screen adaptations. IF
  
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    FR 345 - The Holocaust in French Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Discusses how the Holocaust and the persecution of the Jews were represented in French film from 1939 to the present. Students analyze how, at different times of their evolution, French cinema and French society have answered the questions: What happened? Who is responsible? How can we be sure we will never forget? The films analyzed include masterpieces such as Night and Fog, The Sorrow and the Pity, Hotel Terminum, Shoah, M. Klein, Goodbye Children, and Weapons of the Spirit. Closed to students who have taken ML 366 .
  
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    FR 350 - Sex and Violence/Sin and Repentance: Medieval French Literature for Modern Readers

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Readings drawn from the French works of the Middle Ages, from the first document in the ninth century through the end of the fifteenth century (in modern French). These may include Chrétien de Troyes, early lyric poetry, Arthurian and/or epic literature, and historical documents, as well as films based on the texts. IM
  
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    FR 351 - French Women Writers of the Renaissance

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . A study of French Renaissance women who wrote, their writings, and the social context in which they wrote. Includes lyric poetry, letters, short stories, and longer prose pieces of different literary genres. Marguerite de Navarre and Louise Labé are examples of authors read. IG/IM
  
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    FR 352 - French Literary Perspectives I: From the Renaissance to Classicism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Readings drawn from representative works of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Special emphasis on literary analysis, philosophical trends, historical background.
  
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    FR 353 - French Literary Perspectives II: Romanticism and Realism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Readings drawn from representative works of the nineteenth century. Special emphasis on literary analysis, philosophical trends, historical background.
  
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    FR 354 - French Literary Perspectives III: Contemporary Genres

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Readings drawn from contemporary French and Francophone literatures. Special emphasis on social and philosophical thought, artistic trends, and historical background.
  
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    FR 358 - Topics in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Selected themes and/or periods in the literature and culture of eighteenth-century France. Special emphasis is placed on social practices, political thought, artistic trends, and historical background. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May count as either a literature or a culture course. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    FR 359 - Topics in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Selected themes and/or periods in the literature and culture of nineteenth-century France. Special emphasis is placed on social and political thought, artistic trends, and historical background. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May count as either a literature or a culture course. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    FR 360 - Topics in French Theatre

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Selected themes and/or periods in French theatre. Special attention is given to the philosophy and social history of the times and to critical theory of this genre. Topic announced each time the course is offered.
  
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    FR 361 - Topics in French Poetry

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Selected themes and/or periods in French poetry. Special attention is given to the philosophy and social history of the times and to critical theory of this genre. Topic announced each time the course is offered.
  
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    FR 362 - Censored

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 ; FR 216  (may be taken concurrently).

     

      Explores the social, historical, political, and poetic contexts of censorship in nineteenth-century France. By studying the forbidden best-sellers of the nineteenth century together with their popular and legal reception, students discover the ways in which ethics and politics play(ed) an integral role in the book trade. Once considered subversive for questioning marriage, virtue, religion, sexuality, gender, and imperialism, these banned books are now deemed classics. Authors studied include: Gustave Flaubert, Charles Baudelaire, Victor Hugo, Émile Zola, and Rachilde.

  
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    FR 370 - Special Topics in Medieval Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . An intensive study of an author, theme, movement or genre in medieval literature in French. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated for credit with different topics. IM
  
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    FR 371 - Love's Fatal Triangle: Courtly Love and the Development of Arthurian Literature in Medieval French Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . A study of the earliest literature of Arthur and his knights in France and early French literature, where they came from and a consideration of modern representations. Closed to students who have taken ML 371 . IM
  
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    FR 375 - Women's Voices in the Francophone World

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Students read and discuss texts from contemporary women authors who write in French but whose links with French culture take on many forms. The authors studied hail from many parts of the world: not only from the French-speaking countries of Europe, but from different parts of Africa, Asia, Canada, the Near East, and the United States. For some, French was their native tongue; but for a great many, French was their language of adoption, the language they considered most suited to express the complex ties between their own personal story and the social, political, and cultural context in which that story has unfolded. Issues of race, gender, class, language, and power relations are discussed in the context of the works chosen. IAF/IG
  
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    FR 376 - Outsiders in Sub-Saharan Francophone Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216  or written permission of the instructor. Explores the seductions and disillusionments of Europe through the eyes of sub-Saharan Africans abroad, from the colonial period to the present day. Alterity, homesickness, and racism are some of the topics discussed. Readings include works by Bernard Dadié, Jean-Paul Sartre, Ken Bugul, Fatou Diome, and Alain Mabanckou. IAF
  
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    FR 377 - Crime Fiction in French

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Introduces students to the "Roman policier" or crime fiction in French. Tracing the genre from the nineteenth century to the present day, students examine how the popular "polar" responds to historical, societal, and spiritual concerns. Authors studied include: Émile Gaboriau, Edgar Allan Poe, Eugène Sue, Gaston Leroux, Georges Simenon, Georges Perec, and Fred Vargas.
  
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    FR 378 - Comics and Literature in France and Belgium

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Examines the origins, evolution, and importance of comics in French and Belgian cultures and literatures. Students analyze the specific challenges of representing a culture at a specific time in history through voices of so called "high" or "low" cultures. Students also analyze how the histories of fine arts, literature, the press, cinema, and technology influenced the evolution of comics as they continued to reflect the politics and some key beliefs of two French speaking cultures. Authors covered usually include: Hergé, Uderzo, Gossinny, Proust, Tardy, Groesteen, and McCourt.
  
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    FR 379 - Strangers in a Strange Land

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . Examines how various francophone writers characterized their own cultures and sense of home. Students analyze how these writers from different cultures represented the challenges of creating a home in a foreign land, living in exile, or rebuilding a home after a loss. These literary texts enable students to characterize the importance of the concept of home in different cultures and literatures from North Africa, Japan, the United Stated, and France. Authors covered usually include: Bâ, Camus, Bachelard, Yourcenar, Nothomb, and Cendrars.
  
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    FR 380 - Special Topics in French and Francophone Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 216 . An intensive study of an author, theme, or movement in French and/or Francophone literature. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated for credit with different topics and written permission of the department chair.
  
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    FR 381 - Advanced French Grammar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FR 201 ; FR 216  (may be taken concurrently). The systematic study of grammar at an advanced level. Strongly recommended for students prior to study abroad.

German

  
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    GR 101 - Introductory German I

    (3.00 cr.)

    A thorough grounding in the four language skills: reading, understanding, speaking, and writing, as well as an understanding of the structure of the language and the literature and culture of the country. For students with no previous knowledge of the language. Cannot be taken for credit by students who have taken three years of German during high school. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    GR 102 - Introductory German II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of GR 101 . Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    GR 103 - Intermediate German I

    (3.00 cr.)

    A systematic consolidation and expansion of the four basic skills: reading, understanding, speaking, and writing. To increase and perfect students' acquired abilities/proficiencies in the language, and broaden their understanding of the country's culture and literature. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    GR 104 - Intermediate German II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone course, reviewing and reinforcing language skills learned in GR 101-103 to help students attain intermediate level as defined by ACTFL guidelines in the five skills: reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, and culture of Germany and German-speaking areas. Course includes use of the language in context, with authentic readings, discussion in German, and film clips. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    GR 144 - German for Reading Knowledge

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive introduction to German for reading for students with no previous knowledge of German. The course focuses on all elements of grammar and syntax so that students can read texts from business, the humanities, and the sciences. Pronunciation is not stressed. Does not count toward the core, major, or minor.
  
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    GR 150 - German in Context I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Placement by examination. Restricted to students studying in Berlin. German language study with intensive oral practice and review of elementary language structures. Includes contemporary culture in Berlin and comprehensive strategies for five-skills abilities.
  
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    GR 161 - Comprehensive Beginning German

    (6.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Open to students who wish to begin study in a second modern language or who place into GR 102 . A review course for students who have had three years of language study in high school and for students who wish to begin a second modern language. The material covered is essentially the same as for the GR 101-102 sequence, except that it is covered in one semester instead of two. This includes a thorough grounding in the five language skills: reading, listening, speaking, writing, and cultural knowledge, as well as an understanding of the structure of the language, cultures, and literatures of the countries that speak German. Special emphasis is placed on preparing students to begin work at the intermediate language level. Contact time includes six 50-minute class sessions per week. Counts as two, three-credit courses. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required. Required for students who have completed three years of high school German, who wish to continue language study in German, and who place into GR 101 . Closed to students who have taken GR 101 , GR 102 , or the equivalent.
  
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    GR 201 - German Composition and Conversation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 104 . Increases students' oral and writing ability through the assimilation of advanced structural patterns, stylistic analysis of literature, discussion of current events.
  
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    GR 202 - The Living Language: Techniques of Translation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 104 . A transition between language study on the lower-division level, where grammar and oral practice are stressed, to more advanced upper-division courses in which the language becomes the primary means of expression and communication. Focuses on various special topics as dictated by the needs and interests of the students to acquaint them with the contemporary idiomatic usage and specialized vocabulary for fields like business, economics science, or literary criticism.
  
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    GR 204 - German for Oral Proficiency

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 104 . Intensive oral practice in the classroom and with audio-visual media to develop facility in oral expression and aural comprehension.
  
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    GR 210 - Advanced German Composition

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . An in-depth study of styles of written communication: advanced grammatical concepts applied to personal, business, and narrative/creative writing.
  
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    GR 216 - Venturing into the Text

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201  or equivalent. This course prepares students to take advanced literature classes. By reading and analyzing poems, short stories, short novels and materials from the Internet, students improve their ability to read literary texts and analyze them. The course also introduces students to literary theory to help them to better understand the context in which literary texts were written. Through vocabulary acquisition, introduction to basic literary terms and genres, grammar review, essays as well as oral work, students can improve their written and spoken German.
  
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    GR 250 - Business German

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . A study of German as it is used in various German business institutions. Stresses stylistics of business letters and reports as well as techniques of translation.
  
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    GR 301 - German Culture and Civilization I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . A study of the development of German culture from its origins to the present. The first semester covers the periods up to the eighteenth century with special emphasis on the history, politics, art and architecture of the period. The second semester continues examination of the contemporary social context and its historical background. IM
  
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    GR 302 - German Culture and Civilization II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . A continuation of GR 301 .
  
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    GR 303 - Germany Today

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . For students who wish to become acquainted with major aspects of contemporary German culture, as well as social and political developments in Germany, and their influence on current literature and journalism. Focuses on developments after 1970.
  
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    GR 305 - Dungeons, Dragons, Damsels in Distress

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the medieval epic in literature and film. Students study selections of medieval German, French, and Italian epic. They also compare the major epics to their filmed versions and examine popular stereotypes about the knights, women, love, and war in the Middle Ages. Lectures on the culture of the times are included. Same course as ML 305 . IM
  
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    GR 309 - The Classic German Cinema

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201  or equivalent. The course focuses on the function of film in the years between 1895 and 1945. Students discuss the role of filmmakers in the Weimar era and the use of film in the Third Reich. Special emphasis is placed on analyzing the films in relation to the artistic, societal, and historical currents at the time. Filmmakers include Lang, Murnau, Reifenstahl, Wilder, and Sirk. IF
  
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    GR 315 - German and the Nobel Prize in Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201  or GR 202 . Examines the poetry and short fiction of five authors writing in German who have won the Nobel Prize in Literature with the intent of discovering the elements that might have driven the decision to bestow the award. Where possible, film adaptations of the works are examined. Taught in German.
  
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    GR 341 - Contemporary German Cinema

    (3.00 cr.)

    A brief overview of classic German cinema and its contribution to the art of filmmaking. The main focus of the course is the development of German film from 1960 to the present. Students view and discuss works by von Trotta, Schlondorff, Dorrie, Petersen, Wender, Herzog, Fassbinder, Tykwer, Becker, Tim, and Akin, and investigate films in relation to the societal, historical, and political developments. IF
  
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    GR 342 - Vienna: Imperial Splendor and Fin-de-Siecle Decadence

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . Examines the history and culture of the "other" German-speaking country from the vantage point of Vienna. Covers the period from the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to the present, taking a close look at the intellectual, political, and social life of the time.
  
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    GR 344 - Berlin: The Crucible of Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . Examines the intellectual currents that shaped Berlin in the early twentieth century. Students focus on the contributions made by prominent German-Jewish authors, discuss the foment of the Weimar years, and Berlin's contributions to a developing Europe.
  
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    GR 352 - The Giants of German Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . A study of the general cultural and literary background of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in Germany. Features representative works from such outstanding German writers as Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Novalis, Eichendorff, and Kleist.
  
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    GR 354 - Confronting the Other in Contemporary German Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . A study of the development of German literature through an examination of works of drama, poetry and prose that show the artist's attempts to deal with the changing realities and problems of the contemporary world.
  
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    GR 356 - Enchanting the Listeners: The Art of Storytelling

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . Historical development of the novella in German from its beginnings in the eighteenth century to its modern exponents such as Thomas Mann and Franz Kafka. Special emphasis on the many problems in defining the form and function of a novelle.
  
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    GR 358 - Sexual Politics in German Drama

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GR 201 . Uses the plays of Buechner, Hebbel, Hauptmann, Brecht and Hochhut to trace the development of German drama and theatre in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Special emphasis on the readings in relation to their sociopolitical background. IG
  
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    GR 359 - History and Development of German Business

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One GR 200-level course or written permission of the instructor. Introduces students to the history and development of German business practices. Special emphasis is placed on the economic, social, and political ramifications of unification and developments in the European Union. Taught in German. Closed to students who have taken ML 359 . GT

Global Studies

  
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    GT 400 - Senior Seminar in Global Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to senior global studies majors. An opportunity for integrating the student's experience of the global studies program. It consists of a senior project, guest lectures, and other integrative work selected by the instructor. GT (Spring only)
  
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    GT 401 - Global Studies International Experience Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to juniors and seniors and global studies majors who cannot study abroad. The internship ordinarily requires 150 hours of internationally-related work or service (usually unpaid) distributed evenly over a semester. Students must submit a portfolio for grading by the faculty supervisor during the final examination period of the semester in which the internship is completed. The portfolio consists of a weekly journal or log of activities and observations, and a six to eight page essay reflecting on what was learned from the experience and its relevance for global studies. The final grade will also take into account the evaluation of the student's performance by the site supervisor. Written permission of the global studies director, a faculty supervisor, and the site supervisor. GT

Greek

  
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    GK 101 - Introductory Greek I

    (3.00 cr.)

    An enriched beginning course, intended for students with no previous knowledge of the language, which emphasizes grammar, syntax, and vocabulary through extensive reading of easy passages from Greek authors. An introduction to the literature and culture of Athens. (Fall only)
  
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    GK 102 - Introductory Greek II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 101  or equivalent. A continuation of GK 101 . (Spring only)
  
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    GK 103 - Intermediate Greek

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 102  or equivalent. Consolidation of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Transition to reading extended passages of real Greek. May be offered in Rome. (Fall only)
  
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    GK 104 - Greek Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. A reading of select works of Greek prose and/or poetry with close attention to their language, style and literary value. (Spring only)
  
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    GK 161 - Comprehensive Beginning Greek

    (6.00 cr.)

    An intensive course covering the material of GK 101  and GK 102 , the first half of the beginning Greek grammar sequence.
  
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    GK 301 - Advanced Greek I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. Readings in Greek at the advanced level. When possible choice of authors is based on student preference. May be repeated once for credit.
  
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    GK 302 - Advanced Greek II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. Readings in Greek at the advanced level. When possible, choice of author or genre is based on student preference. May be repeated once for credit.
  
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    GK 303 - Selected Readings in Greek I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. Readings in Greek at the advanced level. Topics vary according to student interest. May be repeated once for credit.
  
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    GK 304 - Selected Readings in Greek II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. Readings in Greek at the advanced level. Topics vary according to student interest. May be repeated once for credit.
  
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    GK 305 - Selected Readings in Greek III

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. Readings in Greek at the advanced level. Topics vary according to student interest. May be repeated once for credit.
  
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    GK 310 - Plato

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. A reading, partly in the original and partly in translation, of a work of Plato. Emphasis on Plato's language, style, and philosophy.
  
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    GK 311 - Greek Tragedy: Euripides

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. A survey of Euripides' tragedies, read partly in the original and partly in translation. The place of Euripides in the history of Greek tragedy.
  
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    GK 312 - Greek Tragedy: Sophocles

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. A survey of Sophocles' tragedies, read partly in the original and partly in translation. Emphasis on style, characters, language, and themes.
  
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    GK 323 - Greek Historians

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. A reading, partly in the original and partly in translation, of Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon-their characteristics as historiographers are examined.
  
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    GK 325 - Herodotus

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. A reading, partly in the original and partly in translation, of Herodotus' History. Discussions focus on Herodotus' historical methodology, literary technique, and the wealth of legends, tall tales, and historical and anthropological information he offers.
  
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    GK 330 - Hesiod

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. Readings in ancient Greece's second towering epic poet. Hesiod describes the shocking and violent origin of the Greek gods, how and why they got along so poorly, the origin of humankind, and our place in the mythological universe-among other fascinating things. The class will encounter Pandora and Prometheus, Zeus at this best and worst, the Ages of Man, the nature of Justice, monsters, and mayhem.
  
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    GK 360 - Independent Study: Greek

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: GK 103  or equivalent. An independent study in Greek language and/or literature. Topics vary. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.

History

  
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    HS 101 - Making of the Modern World: Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines European history since 1500 focusing on the evolution of modern culture and society along with the emergence of democracy, capitalism, communism, fascism, and Nazism. Additional questions include: the difficult development of religious diversity; the integration of science and industry; the changing roles of women and men; colonization and decolonization; and the global impact of the many European wars. The course is amply illustrated with art and images from the relevant periods. GT
  
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    HS 102 - Making of the Modern World: United States I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines European colonization of North America, the formation of the United States, and the challenges facing the new nation in the first half of the nineteenth century. Emphasis is placed on the interactions between diverse groups of Europeans, Native Americans, and African Americans. The course aims to establish a basic understanding of modern events and processes from initial encounter through the Civil War, including the interactions between North America and the Atlantic World. Closed to students who have taken HS 340 . GT/IU
  
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    HS 103 - Making of the Modern World: United States II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Covers the history of the United States since the Civil War as the nation grew into an industrial and international power, and as it struggled to transform itself from a nineteenth-century republic that restricted citizenship rights along racial and gender lines into a diverse modern society. Topics include: Reconstruction; urban/industrial development and reform; immigration and the expansion and contraction of democracy in the early twentieth century; the world wars; the Great Depression; postwar culture and society; the impact of the Cold War; social movements; and the fracturing of consensus. Closed to students who have taken HS 341 . GT/IU
  
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    HS 104 - Making of the Modern World: South Asia

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines how the seven countries of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives) have evolved since early times as places with distinct cultures, religions, and traditions. The course deals with their precolonial political and social governance as independent entities, the relative impact of European imperialism after 1500, and their development since independence in the twentieth century. Includes discussion and samples of Indian cuisine. GT/IA
  
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    HS 105 - Making of the Modern World: East Asia

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines changes, trends, and developments in nineteenth- and twentieth-century East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam). Emphasis is placed on each country's traditional culture and the challenges to it by foreign imperialism and domestic pressures; the political, economic, social, and cultural hurdles each country faced in its effort to find the appropriate national path to modernity; the crucial roles played by wars and revolutions; and critical developments in each country's forging a modern identity in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. GT/IA
  
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    HS 106 - Making of the Modern World: Africa

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores selected themes in African history from the eighth through the twenty-first centuries, including the emergence of African states and long distance trade; the organization and impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade; European conquest and colonization; social and economic change during the colonial period; the rise of nationalism and the struggle for independence; and the impact of globalization in contemporary Africa. Considers issues of change and continuity in African societies, as well as the differential impact of social and economic change on women and people of different socioeconomic groups. GT/IAF
  
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    HS 107 - Making of the Modern World: The Middle East

    (3.00 cr.)

    Surveys the history of the Middle East (the Arab world, Turkey, and Iran) from the nineteenth century to today. Examines the impact of imperialism on the political, economic, and social development of the region; the emergence of nationalist movements and the formation of modern nation states; the rise of Islamism; the politics of oil; regional and international conflicts, including the enduring Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the two Gulf wars; and the 2011 Arab uprisings. GT/IA
  
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    HS 108 - Making of the Modern World: Latin America

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian populations to the present. This course examines the political, social, and economic development of both Central and South America. Emphasis is given to the roles Native American, African, mixed blood individuals, and women played in creating modern Latin American identities. U.S.-Latin American relations are explored together with regional economic and political trends. GT/IL
  
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    HS 300 - Death of the Roman Republic

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. A study of the final century of the Roman Republic when Rome suffered under the struggles for personal power of men like Sulla, Mark Antony, and Julius Caesar. Focuses on primary sources with a particular emphasis on the writings of Cicero who documented the final years of the Republic in public speeches as well as private, biting personal letters. Same course as CL 300 . II
  
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    HS 301 - The Church and the Roman Empire

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. A tiny, new religion and a vast, old empire collide. An examination of the early Church in the context of the Roman Empire. Topics include women in pagan and Christian societies; places and forms of worship; reasons for and pace of the Church's expansion; orthodoxy and heterodoxy in the early Church; myths concerning the persecutions; the Christians' debt to pagan ways of thinking and doing; the earliest Christian art; class and race as factors in the Christianization of the empire; the organization of the early Church; the Church's response to the sexual mores of its pagan neighbors; origins of the Christians' reputation for bizarre sexual promiscuity and human sacrifice; Constantine. Same course as CL 301 . IC/II/IM
  
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    HS 302 - Renaissance Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. Students examine the Renaissance, a period of vague chronology but great accomplishments, both for good and bad. Classical humanism, artistic and technological innovations, and the expansion of European power around the globe are stressed. Students also focus on the Hundred Years War, conflicts among the Italian principalities, and the rise of the Ottoman Turks as a Mediterranean power. Rapid urbanization, the rise of commercial capitalism, and the breakdown of religious hegemony in the West are also considered. IM
  
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    HS 303 - The Early Middle Ages

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. When the Roman Empire fell to the barbarian invasions of the fourth century and later, a new age dawned on Europe. Cultural, religious, economic, social, intellectual, technological, military, and political changes all quickly occurred as Roman emperors were replaced by non- Roman chiefs. Into a western vacuum created by the fall of Rome rose the Catholic Church, which kept alive the ideals of morality, theology, and education. Into the eastern vacuum arose a different religious entity, Islam; it, too, presented a values structure similar to that of Catholicism. Eventually, these two religious entities would clash. But before that occurred, east and west had to develop their own characters. For Europe, this meant the rise of the Franks and eventually of their leader, Charlemagne. From his reign came the modern division of western European countries. But, even more importantly, from his reign came the modern division of the Middle Ages as an era which, despite the invasions of new barbarians (the Vikings and Magyars), would last for nearly 700 years after his death. GT/IC/IM
  
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    HS 304 - Reformation Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. In 1517, Europe erupted into religious chaos when an unknown Augustinian professor of theology, Martin Luther, posted his Ninety-five Theses on the door of the Church of Wittenberg.  Other reformers soon followed – Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, Thomas Müntzer, Menno Simons, and Henry VIII.  By 1550, more than half of Europe was Protestant or leaning towards conversion, but Protestantism could not unify.  Catholicism was slow to respond, but by the middle of the sixteenth century Ignatius Loyola had founded the Society of Jesus and the Council of Trent had begun to meet.  What followed, called the Counter-Reformation or the Catholic Reformation, began to regain its religious dominance.  But it had come at a cost: vehemence from the altars had given way to violence on the battlefield.  France and the Low Countries were embroiled in long wars between Catholic and Protestant armies. In 1618, the Holy Roman Empire would follow with the Thirty Years War, the most bloody conflict ever fought on European soil. IM
  
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    HS 305 - The Later Middle Ages

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. Follows the history of Europe, Byzantium, and the Middle East from the end of the first millennium A.D. until c. 1500. From what some call "the Dark Ages" arose a more advanced Western world, one which began to develop in new and progressive ways. Despite the continual fighting between Islamic and Christian forces, first in the Middle East and then in southeastern Europe, kingdoms and principalities flourished under the leadership of strong nobles; farms brought forth more grain and other produce; towns grew and gave birth to a middle class; the population was enlarged by a high birth rate and the lack of natural hindrances; and universities were founded and education began to reach all classes. At the same time, a strong Catholic Church dominated all of these institutions, while moving steadily toward the Reformation. IC/IM
 

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