2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Mar 01, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Writing

  
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    WR 324 - Speech Writing and Delivery

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 . Informed by classical rhetoric, students become skilled in the Jesuit tradition of eloquentia perfecta: clear thought delivered eloquently. Students, transforming theory into practice, have ample opportunity to practice speaking to inform, persuade, or commemorate. Subjects for speeches are drawn from political and social issues; the course also offers a business segment devoted to interviewing and communicating in the workplace. The class improves the chance of success in other courses that require oral presentations; it builds a confidence and ability to speak in groups and to a public audience that is a lifetime asset.
  
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    WR 325 - Professional Writing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 . Prepares students interested in business, the humanities, and STEM fields for writing in the workplace. Using workplace technology, such as the Microsoft Office Suite, students produce memos, résumés, cover letters, reports, proposals, and presentations. These projects require students to consider the purpose, audience, and context of professional settings when writing on the job. Students also learn how to use text and visuals together in order to create clear and persuasive documents. For team projects, students collaborate with clients or community partners to develop experiential skills. IFS
  
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    WR 326 - Technical Writing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 . Helps students interested in business, the humanities, and the STEM fields prepare for jobs that require technical writing. Using industry-standard technology, such as Adobe Creative Suite and social media, students produce standard workplace documents, as well as instructions and technical descriptions. Students learn about project management, workplace ethics, and basic research methods through usability testing and user experience (UX) projects. Students collaborate in teams with clients or community partners to develop high-impact, visually dynamic documents such as grant proposals, websites, and multimedia applications. IFS
  
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    WR 327 - Civic Literacy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 . Students investigate the theoretical and experiential nature of literacy/literacies as a central form of civic action and social justice. Students collaborate with a local adult literacy program in Baltimore in a project-based service-learning model. By integrating theory (readings) and practice (service) through a variety of assignments such as essays, journals, advocacy pieces, and exams, this course challenges students to see literacy as multifaceted and to think critically about the links between literacy and choice, power, democracy, and freedom. IPJ
  
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    WR 333 - Writing Fiction

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 230 . Training in the art of the short story. Students write several short stories for the course, revising the best of them for their grades. Workshop discussions evaluate work in progress and completed stories. Readings from current writers.
  
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    WR 334 - Forms of Fiction

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 230 . A study in short fiction in its various forms, including ancient tales to nineteenth-century sketches and twenty-first-century microstories. Students gain the historical and critical context necessary for understanding such movements as realism, fabulism, and minimalism, examining the stories themselves to see how each genre is distinct. Writing activities afford students the opportunity to explore various stylistic elements of the short story.
  
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    WR 335 - Advanced Fiction: The Short Story

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 333  or WR 334 . A continuation of intermediate fiction writing, on an advanced and individual level. Students write and revise two or more short stories of publishable quality. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    WR 340 - Writing Poetry

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 230 . A workshop course in writing poetry, emphasizing a range of subjects and types. Contemporary readings.
  
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    WR 341 - Poetic Forms

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 230 . A study of the ways poems are put together through the science of prosody and the less exact methods of free verse. Each system has its distinctive history, vocabulary, and seminal texts; the thesis is that, whether imposed or discovered, form can always be analyzed. Students read and write about the scholarship of the science, perform extensive scansions and explications of poems, and write their own poems in received, concocted, and ad hoc forms.
  
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    WR 342 - Advanced Poetry

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 340  or WR 341 . A continuation of WR 340  or WR 341  on an advanced level. A workshop in writing poetry. Readings from current writers.
  
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    WR 343 - Special Topics in Writing About Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. Music, food, art, sports, and gaming are among the possible topics students study and explore as they write a wide variety of genres on a single cultural topic. Topic is announced each time course is offered.
  
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    WR 345 - Screenwriting for Film and Television

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. Means and methods of narrative screenplay writing for motion pictures and television are explored. Included are analysis of the structure and dialogue of selected screenplays, exercises in writing and evaluating screenplays, and an investigation of how screenplays are marketed in today's media. Final project: a completed screenplay. IF
  
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    WR 347 - Writing with Images

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. Inspired by comics, graphic novels, advertisements, info-graphics, and more, students write a variety of image-enriched texts—from blog posts to posters—to learn how texts with images create powerful arguments.
  
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    WR 348 - Writing about Music and Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. Students explore key genres in writing about popular music of the past century up to the present day. Readings include Greil Marcus on the American ballad tradition; Dorothy Marcic on gender issues in popular hits; Jim Cullen on Bruce Springsteen's relation to Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, and Woody Guthrie; and selections from annual volumes in the Best Music Writing series. Principal assignments include an extended essay/review, a cultural studies paper, and a memoir/essay connected to issues of music and culture; students choose the artist(s) or genre(s) that they focus on in their papers.
  
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    WR 350 - Art of Prose: Selected Authors

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. A study of the nonfiction prose of a single writer across multiple genres. Introduces students to the range and scope of a writer, as well as ways of analyzing a writer's style and the influence of sociocultural factors on a writer's career. Writing assignments may include analytical reading responses, imitations, original essays related to the writer's work, and written exams. May be repeated for credit with different topics. IU
  
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    WR 351 - Art of the Essay: Women Writers

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. What are American women essayists thinking and writing at this moment in history? This question is investigated through contemporary essays by writers who are women: writers whose work has been nourished and shaped by feminist theory and whose work crosses gender lines, age, and ethnicity; writers whose interests range beyond the domestic or personal sphere. The assigned reading provides models by which students may shape their own ideas and essays. Discussions explore how contemporary American women writers are creating a tradition of their own. The course offers a supportive environment for developing technique and exchanging ideas. IG/IU
  
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    WR 352 - Biography and Autobiography

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. A study of the ways writers create a "self" and an "other" in language. Covers the range from private writing such as journals to more public forms of biography and autobiography and the imaginative use of those forms. Students read a broad sample of authors and types of writing and write three essays in which they experiment with those types.
  
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    WR 353 - The Contemporary Essay

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. The essay is explored as a medium for contemporary thought. Students read and analyze the writing and reflections on writing of such essayists as Ellen Goodman, Tom Wolfe, Alice Walker, Barbara Tuchman, and Calvin Trillin, as well as other work that appears in current magazines, newspapers, and essay collections. Students keep journals, do research, and conduct interviews to produce a portfolio of their own potentially publishable formal and informal essays on issues of their choice.
  
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    WR 354 - Writing about the Environment

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 . To write about the environment is to cultivate an appreciation for one's place in regional, national, and global contexts. Students write in various genres as they learn what traditions inform contemporary environmental writing and explore the ways in which representations of nature influence the complex relationship between Americans and the environment. A background in science is not required. IES/IPJ/IU
  
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    WR 355 - Travel Writing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to Loyola students studying abroad. Students explore the prose genre of travel writing while living and studying abroad. They read in the canon of contemporary and traditional travel literature-newspaper and magazine articles, short pieces, literary essays, and nonfiction books. Inspired and informed by their adventures in the "here and now" of travel abroad, they keep a weekly "memoir journal" and write three major pieces.
  
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    WR 356 - Writers in the Catholic Tradition: Selected Authors

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 . A study of one or more writers whose work is shaped by the Catholic tradition. Examining work with this common foundation introduces students to the ways that Catholic belief or background may influence a writer's concerns, techniques, or viewpoint. May be repeated for credit with different topics. IC
  
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    WR 357 - Writing about Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 . Students produce a series of critical essays about film after viewing and analyzing works representing various periods and styles, including films by such influential figures as Hitchcock, Fellini, and Truffaut. Familiarizes students with film concepts, terms, and recent trends in film criticism and theory. They will explore in their writing questions relating to such matters as genre, audience, theme, and censorship. IF
  
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    WR 358 - Literary Reviewing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. Writing reviews is often a good way to "break into" publishing. Students learn reviewing styles of a wide range of publications and write reviews of contemporary poetry and fiction appropriate to several of those journals.
  
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    WR 385 - Special Topics in Creative Writing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 , one WR 200-level course. An in-depth study of an issue or emphasis within the general realms of fiction, poetry, or literary nonfiction. Topic announced each time course is offered. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    WR 386 - Special Topics in Rhetoric

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 . Students use rhetorical theory to consider a selected area of study, such as gender, ethnicity, religion, current events, or the environment. Writing assignments may include rhetorical textual analyses and academic essays, as well as presentations, videos, websites, and blogs. Topic announced each time course is offered. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    WR 387 - Special Topics in Professional Writing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: WR 100 . Students learn about and apply rhetorical theories to selected areas of study, such as grants and proposals, visual literacy, writing and technology, technical communication, usability research, and civic engagement. Writing assignments may include traditional genres, such as reports, letters, memorandums, job search documents, and presentations, but also multimedia presentations, videos, websites, and blogs. Topic announced each time course is offered. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    WR 400 - Senior Seminar

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to seniors. A reading survey of contemporary writers and trends in contemporary writing. Texts are novels, books of poems, and nonfiction prose written within the last 10 years and chosen to provoke discussion of what it means to be a writer today. Requirements may include reading journals, oral reports, issue papers that arise out of class discussion, and a culminating nonfiction prose project that takes advantage of the seminar itself and years of deepening study in core and majors courses. Required of all writing majors and writing minors.
  
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    WR 401 - Senior Portfolio

    (3.00 cr.)

    An independent study designed for students who have taken introductory and advanced courses in a sequence in a specific genre. Students select and revise their best work to date and add new work to create a portfolio appropriate for admission to graduate school. Extensive reading is also required. Students meet at least once a week with their faculty sponsor. By invitation only. A recommended course for writing majors and minors considering graduate school in writing. To be taken as an elective, preferably during the fall semester of the senior year.
  
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    WR 402 - Writing Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to junior or senior writing majors, interdisciplinary writing majors, or writing minors. Students plan and apply for a supervised, semester-long internship in a professional workplace that involves writing, editing, teaching, publishing, copy editing, journalism, corporate communications, or other writing-intensive activities. Students are expected to work approximately 10 hours per week for a total of 150 hours. Emphasis on practical professional preparation and creation of a portfolio. Written or electronic permission of the internship coordinator or department chair. May be taken once for degree credit and repeated for non-degree credit. May not be used for core credit. Paid internships are usually ineligible for degree credit. (Fall only)
  
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    WR 403 - Writing Internship

    (1.00 cr.)

    Restricted to junior or senior writing majors, interdisciplinary writing majors, or writing minors. Students plan and apply for a supervised, semester-long internship in writing in a professional workplace that focuses on writing-related activities such as editing, teaching, publishing, copy editing, media writing, or corporate communications. Students must keep detailed records, complete online assignments, and meet with the internship coordinator while performing at least 50 hours of work at their chosen site. Emphasis on developing practical writing abilities including a portfolio. Written or electronic permission of the internship coordinator or department chair. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. May be repeated for nondegree credit only. (Pass/Fail)
  
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    WR 496 - Environmental Studies Experience

    (3.00 cr.)

    A capstone experience in the environmental and sustainability studies minor, in which a student arranges an internship, independent study, or research experience with a faculty sponsor to engage in an in-depth exploration of a topic associated with environmental or sustainability issues. Written or electronic permission of a sponsoring faculty member and the environmental and sustainability studies director. Generally completed during the senior year. IES
 

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