2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Jan 20, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Studio Arts

  
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    SA 366 - Three-Dimensional Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn to recognize and use the elements that embody a three-dimensional work of art, defining and using those principles in a variety of media. Students are encouraged to discover new methodologies of visual thinking that reflect the interdisciplinary nature of art today. The problem-solving nature of this course includes both conceptual and observations-based assignments. Students' three-dimensional artworks are developed in the classroom and from their sketchbooks.

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    SA 367 - Public Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the field of public art. Beginning with an investigation of the theoretical context of public art, students learn the controversial history of artworks and monuments in public spaces. Students also meet with community partners in the city of Baltimore and collaboratively determine the details of a public art project. Students then develop a series of drawings, models, digital mock-ups, and written proposals for a larger public art project. Accepted proposals are created and installed in the final phase of the class. Same course as CM 370 .

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

  
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    SA 400 - Professional Practices for Artists

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to the working world of the professional artist. Students create a cohesive body of work that is critiqued throughout the semester and exhibited at the end of the semester. Students produce a portfolio of digital images of their artwork with accompanying professional materials aimed at being able to participate in the art world in some form upon graduation. Students enter at least one exhibition, mat and frame an artwork, and attend at least one opening reception for an exhibition off-campus. Recommended for visual arts minors. Normally taken in the fall semester of the senior year. Required for all visual arts majors who are not enrolled in SA 412 ; Same course as PT 400 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    SA 402 - Special Topics in Studio Arts

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive study of an area of studio art that is not regularly offered as a course. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    SA 412 - Senior Project in Studio Arts

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students develop an advanced project under the direction of a faculty member. Work on the project continues throughout both semesters of the student's senior year. Written or electronic permission of the department. Proposals for senior projects must be approved by the fine arts faculty during the spring semester of the student's junior year.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Seniors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    SA 499 - Studio Arts Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    An internship provides students the opportunity to build a portfolio and learn on-the-job skills. Students may complete independent work as an intern with a professional, business, office, or community organization (or within a similar environment) that provides them with further experience in their area of interest. Students must remain in continual contact with the Loyola faculty mentor through the internship's duration and are responsible for keeping a daily journal detailing internship activities, including the date, time, and what work was accomplished. Journal entries are shared with the faculty mentor each week. The line of inquiry between the faculty mentor and student supporting the internship culminates in an agreed-upon summary of the experience, such as a small exhibition or PowerPoint presentation.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually


Theatre

  
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    DR 100 - Stagecraft

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students apprentice on set construction, scene painting, lighting, and running crews. This entails hands-on, supervised work on the Evergreen Players' main-stage productions. Participants work with the professional set and lighting designers of Loyola productions.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 210 - American Musical Theatre: Uptown and Down

    (3.00 cr.)

    Studies the variety found in American musical theatre, including musical drama, opera, and musical comedy. Through readings, recordings, and video tapes, students investigate this lively art. At least one live performance is viewed during the semester. Same course as MU 210 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IU
  
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    DR 250 - Introduction to Theatre History

    (3.00 cr.)

    The evolution of theatre as an art form is explored, from ancient Greek to contemporary performance. Major theatrical genres/movements, playwrights, directors, actors, and designers are covered. An emphasis is placed on the link between society and theatre, focusing on key moments in the Theatre's development. Includes attendance at theatre productions on campus and in the Baltimore/Washington area. Fulfills fine arts core requirement. Theatre tickets cost approximately $50.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 251 - Experience of Theatre

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students experience theatre by performing different roles associated with theatrical production. Students act as readers, audience members, actors, reviewers, playwrights, directors, and designers. An emphasis is placed on students understanding and experiencing all aspects of the theatrical process. Includes attendance at theatre productions on campus and in the Baltimore/Washington area. Fulfills fine arts core requirement. Theatre tickets cost approximately $50.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 252 - Introduction to Theatrical Production

    (3.00 cr.)

    A comprehensive, experiential course in theatrical production. Students engage in major areas of production (acting, directing, design), as well as playwriting, theatre criticism, and the staging of an original theatre piece. Includes attendance at theatre productions on campus and in the Baltimore/Washington area. Recommended for theatre majors and minors. Fulfills core requirement. Closed to students who have taken DR 251 . Theatre tickets cost approximately $50. Same course as HN 321 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 254 - Introduction to Theatre Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the basic principles of design, with an emphasis on scenic, costume, and lighting design. Students develop the working vocabulary of design principles, learn collaborative skills, and practice in applying design principles to texts and theatrical spaces. Projects include designs in all three major areas.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 260 - Introduction to Dance

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to a variety of dance styles including ballet, modern, and some social and ritual dance. In addition to training students in dance technique, improvisation, and composition, the course is also recommended to actors for training in movement. Includes visits to dance performances and screening of dance videos.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 261 - Dance Movement and Technique

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students continue to study concepts and principles of dance as they apply to dance technique (ballet, modern, and jazz composition and improvisation). Dance history and styles are integrated into class and form the core of written assignments. Students broaden their knowledge of dance through movement, readings, video, writings, attendance at dance performances, and performance.

    Prerequisite: DR 260  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 263 - Modern Dance Technique

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students study modern dance technique based on the concepts of movement developed by modern dance pioneers. Students learn several modern dances during the semester and have an opportunity to perform them.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 264 - Movement as Medium

    (3.00 cr.)

    Movement is a medium of expression used by artists from across the realms of visual arts, theatre, dance, and music. Students investigate avant-garde directors and collaborations; traditional physical theatre such as mime, clowning, minstrelsy, and slapstick; and performance art. Readings and discussions are integrated with videos, guest artists, and applied movement experiences.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 265 - Modern Dance

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to a varied modern and postmodern dance vocabulary. Core strength, range of movement, and principles of structural alignment are emphasized. Students are challenged to move on and off balance and shift weight, direction, and level. Selected readings and videos address the major forces and figures in the development of modern dance.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 270 - Scene Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Studies problems of design and the use of the design imagination through projects involving various styles and periods. Emphasis is placed on the use of research techniques involving the preparation of designer elevations through basic design techniques, ground plans, models, and drawing skills. Concentration on the design process and the director-designer relationship is also covered.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 271 - Costume Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides students with the tools for designing costumes for theatrical productions. Several areas are covered, including research techniques, script analysis, designer/director relationship, organizational paperwork, and rendering techniques. Students design costumes for scripts of varying periods and genres. A textbook and art supplies are required.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 275 - Theatre Practicum

    (1.00 cr.)

    Requires supervised, hands-on experience in a particular area of theatrical production for a main-stage Evergreen Players, Poisoned Cup, or Spotlight Players production. Areas of concentration include acting, directing, set construction, lighting, prop and costume construction, stage management, and running crews. The faculty supervisor details responsibilities. Fine arts majors, minors, and interdisciplinary majors with a concentration in theatre must take three practicums, each in a different area. May be repeated twice for credit. (Pass/Fail)

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 278 - History of Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the evolution of film from the development of silent films through contemporary works. Major directors and movements are investigated. Same course as PT 278 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IF
  
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    DR 279 - Silent Cinema

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the formation of what is now the Hollywood industry-the development of the major studios and the star system. Discussions of major actors and directors center on films that highlight their strengths and weaknesses, as well as the difficulty experienced in making the transition to sound films. Same course as PT 279 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IF/IU
  
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    DR 301 - Improvisation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on listening and responding, freeing the instrument, and collaborative problem solving in the creation of spontaneous performances. Improvisation is also applied to rehearsal of scripted material and actor training. Topics include scene building, character development, comedy, and storytelling. The final project is a public performance.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 309 - Opera and Theatre

    (3.00 cr.)

    Many operas are based on great literary and dramatic sources. Details the transformation of these works from spoken drama to musical setting. Traces the works' origins citing direct parallels, dissimilarities, omissions, condensations, and the musical conventions of opera. Addresses the association of librettist and composer. Compares various performances, both historic and current, and discusses the benefits and drawbacks of opera on film. Same course as MU 309 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 350 - Acting I

    (3.00 cr.)

    How does an actor prepare a performance? Through training of the physical and vocal instrument as well as exercises in concentration, perception, imagination, improvisation, emotion, and expression, students acquire the skills needed to analyze and perform scenes.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 351 - Directing I

    (3.00 cr.)

    How does a director prepare a performance? Each step of directing-from play selection to casting; from rehearsal techniques to final costume, set, lighting, and sound design-is investigated and practiced. In addition to in-class composition and scene-work, students cast and stage scenes for the Loyola community.

    Prerequisite: DR 350  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 354 - Acting II

    (3.00 cr.)

    This class focuses on advanced scene work and period technique. Students choose monologues and scenes from a range of historical styles.

    Prerequisite: DR 350  or an audition with the theatre faculty.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 355 - Theatre Criticism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Observing, discussing, and writing about contemporary performance. Topics include techniques for seeing performance in preparation for writing about it, research that supports critical writing, and formats for critiques/reviews in various publications. Students also read and analyze performance criticism being published in contemporary newspapers, magazines, and journals. Students attend productions in the Baltimore/Washington area.

    Prerequisite: DR 251 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 356 - Directing II

    (3.00 cr.)

    An in-depth, hands-on study of directing which builds on DR 351 . Students work with professional designers and hone their skills in all parts of the directing/production process. The course culminates in the public performance of a fully produced, one-act play directed by each student in the class as part of the Evergreen Players' regular season.

    Prerequisite: DR 351 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 357 - Dramatic Adaptation and New Play Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Topics include techniques for adapting nondramatic texts for stage performance and special problems associated with specific source materials. Students collaborate to write a dramatic adaptation and initiate work on an individual adaptation project.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 360 - Voice and Speech

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore oral communication with an emphasis on harnessing the communicative power of the spoken word. We speak all the time - how can we do it with more confidence and effectiveness? This course addresses the many contexts in which we use the spoken word and how we can adapt to these contexts for maximum impact. Course activities lead to increased awareness of each students' habits, ability to assess what use of voice is appropriate for certain texts and situations, and an understanding of and facility with the tools available to enhance verbal communication through conscious use of the "performative" aspects of voice and speech. Students also gain an increased sensitivity to how others communicate verbally with us.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Summer
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 361 - Voice and Movement

    (3.00 cr.)

    A studio course in vocal/physical training for the performer. Topics include vocal/physical freedom, the concept of neutral, versatility and expression, and a growing sense of the voice/body/text connection. Students acquire skills in on-going vocal/ physical improvement and apply course concepts to specific performance settings.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 362 - Special Topics in Dramatic History/Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students focus on a specific period, genre, or playwright such as American theatre, contemporary performance, Brecht, Absurdism, or farce. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 363 - Special Topics in Performance

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students focus on a specific style of performance such as Shakespearean performance, mask work, or comedy of manners. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 364 - Solo Performance

    (3.00 cr.)

    The history, theory, and creation of the one-person show. Topics include historical and contemporary solo performances; biographical solo works; multicharacter solo works; autobiography in solo performances; and the development of frames, concepts, and approaches to the solo format. Students present part of a work-in-progress to the Loyola community.

    Prerequisite: DR 350  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 365 - Stage Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    A thorough analysis of the technical, organizational, and interpersonal aspects of stage management. The focus is on preparing for, running, and archiving rehearsals and performances. Students observe productions, create a prompt book, and complete a major technical management project on a Loyola production. Additional topics include theatre staff and their relationship to the stage manager, theatrical unions, and basic crisis management.

    Prerequisite: DR 251  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 366 - Special Topics in Scenic Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students focus on specific approaches to scenic design, such as computer rendering (Photoshop and Vectorworks) and studio design for theatre, television, and movie production. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 370 - Queer Theatre and Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines plays and films from the 1960s to the present that tell stories about alternative sexualities including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer identities. The course examines a wide range of texts while asking the questions: what makes a play, or a film, queer? How do we define this genre? Why are queer plays and films important? How have they changed over time? How do we, as spectators, engage with these stories? What do they tell us about our lives and the lives of others?

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IF/IG
  
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    DR 374 - Theatre Production Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    A project based on major involvement in a Loyola theatre production as an actor, director, assistant director/dramaturg, designer, or stage manager. In addition to full involvement in the rehearsal process, this course involves preproduction research/preparation and a postproduction seminar presentation.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    DR 412 - Senior Project in Theatre

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students develop an advanced project under the direction of a faculty member. Work on the project continues throughout both semesters of the student's senior year. Written or electronic permission of the department. Proposals for senior projects must be approved by the fine arts faculty during the student's junior year.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Seniors only.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually


Theology

  
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    TH 100 - Christianity in the Czech Republic

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore aspects of Christianity while studying in Prague, Czech Republic. Does not fulfill theology core requirement.

     

  
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    TH 201 - Introduction to Theology

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the Jewish and Christian scriptures, the history of Christianity, and the way these texts and traditions challenge, and are challenged by, the contemporary world.

  
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    TH 202 - Theology and Catholic Autobiography

    (3.00 cr.)

    Why have Catholics produced an astonishing number of autobiographies? Is it because of Augustine, often credited with creating the genre? Or is it because of the place of spiritual journey in Catholic tradition? Or is it because of a relationship between public conversation and private confession? To answer these questions, students explore the meaning of conversion, calling, and commitment, as well as the value and limits of autobiography as a method of theological reflection.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 203 - Catholic Church: Life and Thought

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of the seminal events of the two-thousand-year history of the Catholic Church. Because the Church's history is so vast and complex, and its membership so various, key events are presented through the prism of the lives and thought of major figures. Generally, the persons selected are canonized saints or those proposed for canonization; whether pope or lay woman, each is acknowledged to have lived a Christ-like life, sometimes under the most trying circumstances. Without exception, the persons studied are integral to universal Catholicism and can accurately be called re-formers of the Church. Profoundly involved with the ideas, issues, movements, and crises of their time, they exerted an extraordinary influence on contemporaries, becoming in the process exemplars for future generations of Catholics. In this way, they shaped the course of Church history. Students assess carefully why the weight of their accomplishments is felt even to this day.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 206 - Liturgical Art and Architecture

    (3.00 cr.)

    An exploration of theology expressed in Christian liturgical art, architecture, and worship space. Using an historical approach, the diverse forms, contexts, and world views that have shaped ritual, visual objects, and worship space from the early church to the present are investigated, each with the purpose of understanding the underlying theology of the worshipping community's understanding of the sacred, their relationship to God, and their relationship to each other.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: II/IM
  
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    TH 211 - Women in the Christian Tradition

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the contributions of women to the Christian tradition, as wells as questions addressed by their presence through the use of primary texts and monographs. Writings include Augustine's letters to women and such topics as the role of widows in the early church and medieval reformers and abbesses. The modern era includes women evangelicals, questions raised by some contemporary feminists, and women and religion in America. Same course as CL 226 .

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IG
  
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    TH 214 - Friends and Foes: Jews and Christians through the Ages

    (3.00 cr.)

    The almost two-thousand-year relationship between Christianity and Judaism has often been characterized, at best, by fear and mistrust, and at worst, by violence and antagonism. Studies the relationship between Church and Synagogue from its beginnings in the first century to the current day.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 215 - Violence and Holiness in Twentieth-Century El Salvador

    (3.00 cr.)

    What does holiness look like in the midst of massive suffering and injustice? This course explores the life and ministry of Saint Oscar Romero within the historical context of El Salvador. From comprising part of the Maya Empire, to becoming a Spanish colony, to being a focal point of U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War (especially during the Reagan Administration [1980-1988]), El Salvador has had a rich and tumultuous past. During the country's civil war (1980-1992), Salvadoran government forces assassinated Bishop Romero for his outspoken criticism of unjust governmental policies and human rights abuses.

    By exploring theological, political, economic, social, and cultural change over time in El Salvador, students consider events that shaped the context of Romero's life, his witness to the Christian gospel, and the significance of his legacy for both the Catholic church and the world. Fulfills the second history core requirement and the second theology core requirement. Same course as HS 395 .

    Prerequisite: One HS-100 level course and TH 201 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IC/IL/IPJ

  
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    TH 216 - Ignatius and the Jesuits: History and Spirituality

    (3.00 cr.)

    A theological and historical investigation of the Society of Jesus, arguably the most influential order in the history of the Catholic Church. From the religious conversion of Saint Ignatius Loyola in Renaissance Spain to the state of the Jesuit order in contemporary America, this course endeavors to clarify and interpret the intellectual, spiritual, and pedagogical vision of Ignatius and his followers. The survey includes an examination of the Spiritual Exercises; a study of the evolution of the Society's structure and mission from the first Jesuits to the present; analyses of diverse Jesuit writings over the centuries; a survey of the dazzling triumphs and nefarious intrigues imputed to the Society, and an overview of sundry 'jesuitical' observations on issues facing Catholics at the end of the twentieth century.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 217 - The Reformations

    (3.00 cr.)

    A theological and historical introduction to the history and ideas of the period of Reformation. This course covers the end of the fifteenth to the middle of the seventeenth century. Students consider key cultural and social changes, from the printing press to revolutions; leading thinkers, from Martin Luther to Ignatius of Loyola; important historical moments, from the Farmers Revolt to the Council of Trent; and the theology, both Protestant and Catholic, undergirding these events. This class utilizes primary texts weekly, supported by historical readings.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 218 - Sacred Journeys: The History and Theology of Christian Pilgrimage

    (3.00 cr.)

    From the Church's earliest days, pilgrims have taken lengthy, sometimes dangerous journeys to visit holy places-to walk where Jesus walked and to see where saints lived and died. The development of Christian pilgrimage, from its beginnings to the present day, is studied with emphasis on the theological concepts behind pilgrimage practices. Visits to local pilgrimage sites are included.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 220 - The Catholic Church in the United States

    (3.00 cr.)

    From the Colonial Era to the present. Examines the relationship between the Catholic Church and American culture. Special attention devoted to Catholic attitudes toward independence and the Revolutionary War; the trusteeship controversy; nativism; post-Civil War movements; American imperialism and neutrality prior to United States entrance into World War I; positions on foreign affairs, e.g., the Spanish Civil War, Fascism, and World War II; domestic background of the Second Vatican Council and ecumenism.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IU
  
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    TH 222 - The Kingdom of God

    (3.00 cr.)

    The image of the Kingdom of God provided the focal point for the message and ministry of Jesus. It has also proved to be a decisive image for Christian theology, particularly in discussions about how the church should relate to secular powers. Begins by studying Jesus' proclamation of the Kingdom of God as it is related in the gospels. It then looks at such figures as Augustine, Luther, and contemporary liberation theologians in order to see how this image of God's kingdom has and continues to inform Christian thought and practice.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 224 - The Gospels and the Earliest Churches

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores what we can discover about Jesus and the earliest Christian communities from the texts of the Gospels and other early Christian literature. Constantly examines how such knowledge is relevant to Christian life today. Same course as CL 224 

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 225 - Biographical Tales of the Bible

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores stories of various individuals from the Old and New Testaments (Abraham, Joseph, Moses, David, Ruth, Esther, Jesus, etc.); analyses structure, rhetorical features, and theological perspectives of the narratives; and inquires how the portrayal of these characters illuminate the shape of God's initiative in human history and the varieties of response. Same course as CL 225 .

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 229 - Images of God in Scripture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self understanding in relation to God. Same course as CL 229 .

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 232 - Food, Hunger, and the Bible

    (3.00 cr.)

    Investigates issues related to food and hunger in the Hebrew Bible and New Testament texts, the ways in which these biblical concepts inform a Christian theology and spirituality of food, and how these biblical concepts relate to modern ethical and social justice issues including: poverty, hunger, and food access; food production; ethical labor practices in agricultural and food industries; sustainability; ethical treatment of animals; community and hospitality, etc. Students investigate biblical principles and apply them to current issues—both local and global.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IPJ
  
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    TH 242 - A History and Theology of Saints

    (3.00 cr.)

    Addresses Christian sanctity as a topic that not only opens a view to central aspects of Catholic faith but also to Western history more generally. Content focuses on the medieval period (500-1500) when the cult of saints held a central position not only in religion but also in social, cultural, and even political life. Students also study the biblical and early Christian influence on the understanding of sanctity as well as the role of the saints in modern Western culture.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 243 - Heaven and Hell

    (3.00 cr.)

    Are heaven and hell real or merely symbolic? What is the ultimate fulfillment of heaven, and how is it related to fulfillment here and now? What is the eternal loss and misery of hell, and how is it compatible with God's infinite mercy? Analyzes human destiny in light of our own task of character formation. Special attention paid to creation and original sin, the offer of salvation, the interplay of grace and freedom. Also treats Church teaching on purgatory, as well as theological speculations about "limbo."

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 244 - Forgiveness and Reconciliation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores Jewish and Christian traditions of forgiveness and reconciliation at several levels: in the aftermath of violent conflicts, through the lens of restorative justice in communities, and in personal relationships. From war crimes to race relations to the betrayal of friends, students dive into the question of when forgiveness is owed, and to whom. Concrete cases of local, national, and global conflict are analyzed from a theological perspective.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IPJ
  
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    TH 245 - Eucharist (The Mass) in Ordinary Time

    (3.00 cr.)

    Studies the history of the Eucharist in Jesus and his Judaism, the logic of traditional controversies over the Eucharist (for example, arguments over "real presence"), and the way the Eucharist challenges (and is challenged by) modern men and women. Most importantly, it studies how the Eucharist can be a way of thinking about God's world through thinking about the ordinary times of our own lives.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 246 - Who is Jesus?

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the identity of Jesus Christ, as expressed in Scripture, the doctrine and tradition of the Church, as well as in art and literature. Emphasizes the historical context of Jesus' life, the variety of ways in which the significance of that life has been articulated over the centuries, and the ways in which one might discern faithful from unfaithful articulations. Same course as CL 246 .

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 247 - The Presence of God: Christian Mysticism, East and West

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the Christian mystical tradition, from its roots in the first century to the present. The course examines biblical texts that have been significant sources of Christian mysticism, as well as the writings of important figures in the mystical tradition.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 249 - Christian Sacraments

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines various understandings of the nature of the Church and the sacraments, focusing particularly on the interrelationship between the two. Specific issues include the place of Israel and the Christian community in the teachings of Jesus and the early Church, the historical development of the practice and theology of the sacraments, the past and present controversies over the nature of both Church and sacraments. Special attention paid to the Roman Catholic tradition, but Protestant and Eastern Orthodox perspectives are also included.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 250 - Theology of Happiness

    (3.00 cr.)

    Everyone wants to be happy, yet what actually is happiness and what are its sources? Is happiness a disposition or is it dependent upon external factors? And what happens when life does not go as planned? What about communal happiness? In this course students investigate the various ways that philosophers and theologians have answered these questions. Texts include excerpts from classic works by St. Augustine and St. Aquinas as well as contemporary works of autobiography and fiction.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 261 - Introduction to Judaism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Evolution of Jewish belief and practice from Abraham to modern times; the historical relationship between Judaism and Christianity.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 262 - African American Religious Thought

    (3.00 cr.)

    Americans of African descent have accumulated a variety of religious experiences and thought since the 1600s. This course places those experiences and thoughts in historical context and seeks to uncover their impact on and importance for theology, politics, society, literature, and the arts. Selected readings in Cone, Raboteau, Hurston, Thurman, and others.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IAF/IU
  
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    TH 263 - The Catholic Church in the Czech Republic

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore the Catholic Church in the Czech Republic through an understanding of the history of the Czech Republic in relation to religion. Of particular interest is the period under communism and the role of the underground church. The course ends by focusing on Catholicism in the contemporary Czech Republic. Taught as part of the Loyola summer program in Prague, Czech Republic.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Summer
  
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    TH 264 - Theology and Children's Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores such tropes as the good life (and death), family, power, God, etc. The extent to which theological reflection and children's literature can mutually illuminate one another is also explored. Readings include works of fiction and theological sources.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 265 - World Christianity

    (3.00 cr.)

    Christianity is a global phenomenon. There are far more Christians living outside of the United States than inside of it. Diverse forms of Christianity from around the world are presented. In addition, the impact of the immigration of Christians from other countries on U.S. churches is explored.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IL
  
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    TH 266 - Christian Theology and World Religions

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines both contemporary and historical theological issues concerning the relationships between Christianity and other religious traditions. This course generally includes a focus on at least one other religious tradition.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IA/IC
  
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    TH 267 - The Holocaust and Jewish Law

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the Holocaust in the context of the continued observance of Jewish law in the face of genocidal persecution. The course introduces students to the development, structure, and function of Jewish law, as well as looks at specific debates among Jews on how their law should be lived out during one of the darkest chapters in human history.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 268 - Either/Or: Philosophical and Theological Perspectives on Faith and Humanism Through Existential Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to the interrelated themes of faith and humanism in "existentialist" fiction and poetry, including authors such as Dostoevsky, Rilke, Hesse, Kierkegaard, and Tolstoy, by drawing on theological and philosophical traditions, texts, and resources. Students engage such questions as: How can and does one live the "authentic" and "good" life in the modern era? How does one resolve the apparent contradictions of a life grounded in faith in God that nonetheless participates in injustice? Can a dialogue between the disciplines of Philosophy and Theology provide resources for addressing these problems? Same course as PL 268 .

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 269 - Theology and Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of major themes in Christian theology which juxtaposes works of modern fiction and poetry with theological writing.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 270 - Creation and Evolution

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prepares students to appreciate what both the Judeo-Christian religion and the sciences say about the world in which we live. Includes an historical review of both the religion and scientific sides so students can situate contemporary views of nature and God.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IES
  
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    TH 271 - Why Do We Suffer? Theological and Spiritual Perspectives on Suffering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Offers an overview of differing religious perspectives on human pain and suffering. Students engage Buddhist, Islamic, Jewish, Christian, philosophical, political, and musical responses to suffering in order to explore their potential to support or thwart healing from physical and emotional suffering.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    TH 272 - The Christian Imagination

    (3.00 cr.)

    Is there a distinctively Christian imagination? What is the relation between faith and human creativity? Do, or should, Christians have a particular way of understanding artistic and literary expression? Students examine a broad range of commentary concerning "the Christian mind," including biblical and historical writings, novels, poetry, drama, psychology, mystical literature, and film.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 273 - Urban Health and Faith

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the impact of religious traditions and faith communities on the understanding and management of urban health issues such as infectious diseases, health disparities, food access, addictions, and public safety.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 274 - Religion, Poverty, and American Health Care

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the role of religions in American health care in the past and in the twenty-first century. This course focuses on social and communal foundations of health care through examination of social identity and its impact on delivery of care in a multicultural, cross-religious setting. Particular attention is paid to the changing roles of Catholic hospitals and non-profits in the context of limited resources and poverty. Students learn of innovative partnerships between religious groups and medical agencies in a way to provide culturally sensitive, sustainable health care in the rapidly changing twenty-first-century America.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IU
  
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    TH 277 - Class and Poverty in Bible, Theology, and the Real World

    (3.00 cr.)

    Assists students in understanding poverty from biblical, theological, and political perspectives. What did Jesus mean when he said "The poor will always be with you"? What causes poverty? How are we to treat "the poor"? This course engages these questions and examines contemporary social issues related to class, poverty, homelessness, and social justice in America today.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    TH 301 - Ethics: Theology and Ethics of Hospitality

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines theological sources and foundations for hospitality. Practices of hospitality such as monastic life, pilgrimages, and hospitals are contrasted with vices of inhospitality such as wrath, gluttony, and bribery. The class considers topics like individualism, friendship, and vulnerability that are applicable to issues like ethnocentricism, health care, and urban planning.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 303 - Ethics: Ancient, Modern, and Christian Approaches to Ethics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Studies the ways in which Christians of the first six centuries answered the question: How should one live? Pays particular attention to the themes which emerge in their answers to this question; e.g., the imitation of Christ, holiness, and the virtues. While some New Testament texts are included in the reading, the primary focus is on the writings of the Church Fathers. The last section of the course studies the writings of twentieth-century ethicists and some contemporary literature to see how these themes of holiness and virtue are developed in recent ethical reflection and discussion. Same course as CL 303 .

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 304 - Ethics: Introduction to Christian Ethics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to the Christian understanding of the moral life through a critical examination of some of the classical texts concerned with this issue.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 305 - Ethics: Contemporary Moral Issues

    (3.00 cr.)

    An inquiry into the process of deliberate and voluntary moral decision, into the ways in which persons assume and assess responsibility for such decisions, and into the formation of conscience and character. Practical applications are made to questions of peace and violence, resources and poverty, marriage and sexuality, education, medicine and politics. Endeavors, through discussion, to share values, insights, and experience with a view to growth in freedom and responsibility. Taught as part of the Loyola summer program in Prague, Czech Republic.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Summer
  
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    TH 307 - Ethics: Marriage and Sexuality

    (3.00 cr.)

    A Catholic theology of human sexuality and the marriage covenant including an analysis of such specific issues as pre- and extramarital sex, homosexuality, marital exclusivity and indissolubility, contraception, abortion, and responsible parenthood.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 308 - Ethics: Justice and the Church in the World

    (3.00 cr.)

    What does faith have to do with politics, economics and ethics in general? Can we say or do anything that will move forward the debates about abortion and sexuality, friendship and the shape of the political commonweal? In terms of theory, the course looks to Christian Scripture, philosophers and theologians to study what has come to be known as 'Catholic social teaching'. This theory is then applied to contemporary ethical questions.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IPJ
  
  •  

    TH 310 - Ethics: Peace Ethics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Concentrates on the theological roots of religious efforts to contribute to peace between and within individuals, nations, and religions. The course surveys the three most important models for thinking about conflict (holy war, just war, and pacifism) in the history of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. It also analyzes the contribution of the Catholic Church in the twentieth century, along with other contemporary peace initiatives and their theological backgrounds.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IPJ
  
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    TH 311 - Ethics: Spirituality and Social Ethics-Biblical and Theological Perspectives

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores ethical issues on both a theoretical and practical level. It begins with biblical and theological bases for thinking about human rights and human responsibilities toward God and neighbor. Contemporary, practical issues explored include how we acquire and distribute our wealth as individuals and as a society, as well as issues of diversity, privilege, poverty, racism, and the environment. Readings in black, liberation, and feminist/womanist theologies as well as Catholic social teaching comprise a significant portion of the study.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
  •  

    TH 312 - Christian Environmental Ethics

    (3.00 cr.)

    How are human beings to value non-human creation? Possible answers are considered to this question by drawing on both Christian theological/ethical sources and contemporary environmental science. The focus is especially on: 1) how to construct an environmental ethic in light of the constant flux of nature; 2) the relationship between ecological justice and social justice; and 3) the relationship between the global economy and the biosphere.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IES
  
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    TH 315 - Ethics: Catholic Social Thought in the United States

    (3.00 cr.)

    American Catholic social thought is a collection of diverse notions and proposals for making American society conform to principles of social justice, elucidated by scripture, tradition, and religious, social and economic experience. Attempts an historical understanding of trends and patterns in the Catholic encounter with social and economic developments in the United States such as emancipation, cosmopolitan conformism, immigration, temperance, industrialization, the labor movement, the New Deal, civil rights, the 'Social Gospel', women's rights, nuclear war, critiques of liberal capitalism.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
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    TH 316 - Ethics: Catholic Spiritual Life in the United States

    (3.00 cr.)

    Spirituality is understood in its functional connotation, as referring to the world of the American Catholic Church in its social, ethnographic, geographical, and even political and economic dimensions and ramifications as they related to formal ecclesiastical life, sacramental practice, ritual activity, contemporary theologies, popular piety-common and persistent beliefs and practices, the line where religion shadows off into superstitions, attitudes toward death, conceptions of hell and visions of the afterlife, parish life, and regional contrasts among different parts of America. Accents what it was like to be an ordinary Catholic in diverse places at various points in American history.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IU
  
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    TH 319 - Ethics: The Church and the Human Body

    (3.00 cr.)

    An exploration of Catholicism's approaches to the human body from the earliest days of the Christian community to contemporary America. Identifies and evaluates the extensive theological and philosophical tradition that Catholicism has brought to matters such as birth control, abortion, celibacy, marriage, chastity, heterosexuality and homosexuality, and self-mortification. Also considers positions within the Church that challenge(d) official Catholic teaching.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 321 - Studies in the Protestant Reformation

    (3.00 cr.)

    The aim of this course is to understand some of the developments, movements, and ideas in early modern Europe that fostered Protestant history, theology, and ethics. Primary figures include Luther, Erasmus, Calvin, and Zwingli along with radical, English, and Catholic reformers.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
  
  •  

    TH 322 - Christianity and Its Critics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Beginning with the earliest followers of Jesus, Christianity has responded to criticism from those outside the faith and from dissenters within. This course investigates historical, theological, political, sociocultural, and philosophical problems related to Christianity and asks students to evaluate ancient and modern critiques of Christianity and judge the adequacy of Christianity's response.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 325 - From Christopher Columbus to Global Catholicism

    (3.00 cr.)

    The Catholic Church is arguably the first, if not the only, truly global culture. Students are introduced to the development of global Catholicism, beginning with the discovery of the New World in 1492. Topics include inter-religious dialogue, the spirituality of the missions, and the modern conflict between church and state.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 326 - Ignatius Loyola and the Spiritual Exercises

    (3.00 cr.)

    A series of meditations on the life of Christ and God's grace in our daily lives, the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius Loyola are the foundation of Jesuit spirituality. This class is a close reading of the entire text in light of key theological concepts such as sin, grace, vocation, and redemption.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 327 - The Virgin Mary in Scripture and Tradition

    (3.00 cr.)

    Devotion to Mary is an essential element of Catholicism. This course studies Marian devotion from the early Church to Pope John Paul II. Topics include Mary's divine motherhood, immaculate conception and assumption, and the (very controversial) doctrines of her role in salvation history as coredemtrix and mediatrix of grace.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
  •  

    TH 329 - Medieval Women Authors

    (3.00 cr.)

    An exploration of the social setting and theologies of medieval women authors, including such figures as Catherine of Siena and Julian of Norwich.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IG/IM
  
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    TH 331 - Finding God in All Things: Spirituality and Prayer in the Christian Tradition

    (3.00 cr.)

    How do we find God? How does God find us? Introduces students to a wealth of prayerful practices, from the traditional to the innovative (e.g., "Jesuit breadmaking"). Classic and contemporary texts, media, and practical exercises. No prior experience in prayer or spiritual practice is presumed.

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC
  
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    TH 335 - An Introduction to the Theology of Saint Augustine

    (3.00 cr.)

    Studies the life and writings of the great fifth-century bishop and theologian, Augustine of Hippo. Topics include grace, free will, scripture, and the role of civil authority. Same course as CL 335 .

    Prerequisite: TH 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IM
 

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