2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Jan 20, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Spanish

  
  •  

    SN 350 - Short Latin American Fiction

    (3.00 cr.)

    Reading and discussion of short stories and very short novels (novellas) by Latin American writers. Topics include sociopolitical, familial, or imaginary worlds in relation to the strategies of fiction. Authors include García-Márquez, Borges, Cortázar, and Fuentes.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 352 - The Golden Age

    (3.00 cr.)

    The most important period in this country's literary heritage surveys Spain's golden age through an examination of representative works such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes, Cervantes' Don Quijote, Tirso de Molina's El Burlador de Sevilla, and Lope de Vega's Peribáñez. Texts for the course are in the Spanish language of the period.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217 ; and one additional SN 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IM
  
  •  

    SN 354 - Contemporary Latin American Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Studies representative, contemporary Latin American writers such as Asturias, Borges, Cortázar, Fuentes, García, Márquez, and Vargas Llosa. Special attention given to works which exemplify innovation in form and the artist's involvement in contemporary social problems.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 355 - Spanish Postwar Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of representative works which bear witness to and examine the contradictions of postwar Spain. Emphasis placed on sociohistorical context and literary analysis.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 357 - Spanish Literature of the Eighteenth Century

    (3.00 cr.)

    An overview of the development of Spanish literature during the Enlightenment. Particular attention is paid to the influence of Enlightenment philosophy and science on the most important figures in Spanish theatre, narrative, and poetry. Readings include works by Cadalso, Feijoo, Jovellanos, Iriarte, and Melendez Valdes.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 358 - A Survey of Spanish Theatre

    (3.00 cr.)

    Surveys the theatre of Spain from its beginnings to the twentieth century. Aims at providing some insight into major periods in Spanish literature through the study of works by such representative writers as Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Jose Zorrilla, Federico Garcia Lorca, Alejandro Casona, and Antonio Buero Vallejo.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 360 - Latin American Short Story

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of this important genre in Latin America from its development in the nineteenth century to the present.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 361 - Civilization and Barbarism in Argentine Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the theme of civilization versus barbarity during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Argentine literature, as well as the subthemes of liberalism versus authoritarianism; Francophilia versus the Pampa; the city versus the rural; man versus woman; and man versus himself. Readings are chosen from representative works of Argentine literature including Mármol, Sarmiento, Gorriti, Borges, and Giardinelli.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL/IG
  
  •  

    SN 362 - Spanish Literature at the Turn of the Century

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the various literary and philosophical responses among Spanish writers to the loss of the last colonies after the war of 1898 and the paradoxical entrance of Spain into the twentieth century. Focuses on the major intellectual trends in Europe and the Americas which influenced radical changes of style and structure in the narrative, poetry, and theatre of the period. Readings include works by Miguel de Unamuno, Pío Baroja, Ramón María del Valle-Inclán, Juan Ramón Jiménez, and Antonio Machado.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 363 - Contemporary Spanish Literature: The Generations of 1914 and 1927

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of Spanish literature at the beginning of the twentieth century (1910-1936), covering the major figures in poetry, drama, and narrative fiction. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between literary structures and the innovations in technology and social and political organization which characterize the period. Readings include Ramón Gómez de la Serna, Carmen de Burgos, Ramón Pérez de Ayala, Pedro Salinas, Federico García Lorca, Ernestina de Champourcin, and others.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 364 - Spanish Literature of Exile: 1939-1975

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of literature written by Spanish exiles after the Civil War (1936-1939), covering the major figures in narrative, poetry, and theater. Focuses on the meaning of exile and the relationship between literary structure and political context of the period. Readings include Francisco Ayala, Rosa Chacel, Max Aub, Rafael Alberti, and others.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 365 - The Latin American Essay and Early Cultural Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines political, social, anthropological, and philosophical speculation from nineteenth-and twentieth-century Latin America. Studies authors such as Sarmiento (Argentina), Martí (Cuba), González Prada (Perú), Cabello de Cabonera (Perú), Hostos (Puerto Rico), and Paz (México). Special emphasis is given to the notion of the nation in its relationship to culture, cultural studies, and cultural history.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IG/IL
  
  •  

    SN 366 - Latin American Testimony

    (3.00 cr.)

    An overview of twentieth century testimonial writings in Latin America. Particular emphasis is given to development, trends, and controversies. The relevance of testimony within Latin American literature and historiography is highlighted. The study of texts from specific regions makes it possible to explore the diverse political, economical, social, and ethnic realities of the continent. Readings include works from Barnet, Poniatowska, Dorfman, Jara, Salazar, and Alegría.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 367 - The Short Story in Spain Since 1936

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of the short story form, beginning with the Spanish Civil War and continuing through the postwar period and the transition to democracy after 1975. Readings and class discussion focus on the short story, both as a literary form and as a means to address the changing relationship between the individual and society over the course of the twentieth century. Authors include Manuel Chaves Nogales, Camilo José Cela, Ana Maria Matute, Ignacio Aldecoa, and Álvaro Pombo.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 368 - Travelers and Migrants in Twentieth-Century Colombian Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines representations of travel, migration, and displacement in Colombian narratives, starting in the 1920s and continuing through various decades of the twentieth century. The readings include fictional narratives such as novels and short stories. From the experience of the characters within the literary works, the course focuses on new identities shaped by traveling throughout geographical and symbolic territories. Additionally, it provides students with a better understanding of the relationship between travel and writing, individuals and community, and center and periphery. Closed to students who have taken SN 308 .

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 369 - From Baroque to Enlightenment: Novo-Hispanic Perspectives

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines texts written by Criollo authors from New Spain whose works demonstrate the ongoing construction of identities in colonial Mexico. These narrations intertwine personal, fictional, and collective events and show the diversity of the colonial reality observed and constructed by these writers. Texts are studied in light of cultural, social, and historical contexts. Readings include the late seventeenth- and eighteenth-century authors Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Carlos Sigüenza y Góngora, Francisco Xavier Clavijero, S.J., Father Servando Teresa de Mier, and José Joaquín Fernández di Lizardi. Visual images and secondary texts serve as complementary course materials.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 370 - Nineteenth-Century Latin American Novel

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the relationship between love and social institutions in nineteenth-century Latin America. Special attention given to the power of love, social norms, dictatorship, and the institution of slavery. Also examines gender/racial issues within their social context.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IG/IL
  
  •  

    SN 371 - The Short Story in Spain, 1875-1925

    (3.00 cr.)

    The theory and evolution of the short story from romanticism through realism and modernism. Students read representative short story collections from each of the important literary movements of the period with a focus on the evolution of aesthetic ideas and structures. Authors include the Duque de Rivas, Cecilia Böhl de Faber, Pereda, Clarín, Pardo Bazán, Baroja, and Valle-Inclán.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 372 - The Nineteenth-Century Spanish Novel

    (3.00 cr.)

    A fascinating journey through the Spanish novel in the second half of the nineteenth century, focusing on the representation of gender roles and social class in the context of the construction of contemporary Spain as a nation. Readings include works by Juan Valera, Benito Pérez Galdós, Emilia Pardo Bazán, and Leopoldo Alas, Clarín.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 373 - Literature and Identity Politics in Peru

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines what Martin Stabb so aptly called the "quest of identity." Works written over five centuries are compared to see how ethnicity, politics, religion, and gender negotiate with each other in their pursuit of identity. Five hundred years of scripted ideological activity is brought into focus: the Conquest, the Colonial Era, the Early Republican Era, and the twentieth century. A diverse sampling of genre types, chronicles, poetry, testimonio, fiction, and essay is included. Of special interest is the problem of representation when men and women of Criollo, Quechua, African, and Asian heritages embark on a quest to define themselves.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IG/IL
  
  •  

    SN 374 - Three Masterworks of Guatemalan Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines three masterworks of Guatemalan literature from the vantage point of the Maya K'iché people. The Popol Vuh, sometimes called the Mayan Bible, finds its origins in cryptographic writing inscribed on the walls of monuments and on pottery in the seventh century, finally being transliterated into an alphabetic script in the sixteenth century and first translated into Spanish during the eighteenth century. Hombres de Maíz by the 1967 Nobel Laureate Miguel Angel Asturias, a non-K'iché learned author, delves into K'iché-Mayan knowledge. Finally, the K'iché-Mayan activist Rigoberta Menchú's testimony given to the Venezuelan anthropologist Elizabeth Burgos in the midst of Guatemala's civil war of the 1970s and 1980s moved Menchú to the center of world consciousness. Menchú was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1992. Attention is given to form and content, problems of epigraphy, notions of literature, indigenismo, indigenous expression, and gender roles, as well as cosmology, nationality, and sadly, genocide. Closed to students who have taken SN 304 .

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 376 - Spanish Prose of the Romantic Period, 1800-1870

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the development of the short story, novella, and narrative essay in Spain during the Romantic period, with special attention paid to the themes of freedom and order as they relate to the position of the individual in modern society. Readings include works by major writers of the time, including Larra, Bécquer, Alarcón, and Fernán Caballero.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 377 - Spanish Romanticism: Poetry and Theatre

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of the theatre and poetry of Spanish romanticism, with particular attention given to the social and historical events which conditioned the rise to prominence of the Spanish middle class during the nineteenth century. In addition to extensive readings from the major figures in each genre, the course focuses on the appearance of women writers and their contributions to the evolution of the literature of the period. Authors include Espronceda, Zorrilla, Becquer, Carolina Coronado, Rosalia de Castro, and Gomez de Avellaneda, among others.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 378 - Crime Fiction in Spain

    (3.00 cr.)

    Since the 1970's, many Spanish authors have turned to the crime novel as a vehicle for chronicling the social and political evolution of the country. This course provides an introduction to how some of the genre's most important works have addressed such issues as the growth of major cities, urban crime, and corruption in all of its forms. Authors studied include Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Andreu Martín, Lorenzo Silva, and Alicia Giménez Bartlett, among others. 

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SN 380 - Modernismo

    (3.00 cr.)

    Development, trends, and influences; study of the works of representative writers of this Latin American literary renaissance, from the initiators to Ruben Dario and the second generation of modernistas.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IG/IL
  
  •  

    SN 381 - Latin American Avant-Garde

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines both formal experimentation and social commitment of Latin American writers as portrayed in works created between 1916 and 1935. Focuses on poems and cultural manifestos that reflect a high aesthetic awareness and an aspiration to define national and continental identities. Representative writers include Vallejo, Huidobro, Villaurrutia, Girondo, Neruda, and Vidales, among others.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 382 - Women Against the Current in Latin America

    (3.00 cr.)

    Discusses important events in the recent history of four Latin American countries (Mexico, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Uruguay) as reflected in the personal histories and testimony of women. In the case of Ecuador and Guatemala, the focus is on the experience of Quichua and Mayan women in their struggle to overcome the discrimination encountered in many aspects of their lives, including the family, the community and the larger political arena. The cases of Mexico and Uruguay offer the opportunity to examine two important political events in the history of these two countries: the struggle against the dictatorship in Uruguay and the social impact of widespread violence in Mexico in recent years. Both cases are recounted from the perspective of imprisoned women who have spoken about their lives and dreams.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217 ; and one additional SN 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 390 - Chronicles of Conquest, Resistance and Transculturation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides the building blocks for understanding the encounter between the Spanish and Native American cultures during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The ideology of the Spanish conquistadores is compared with native strategies for resistance. Special attention is given to two regions: Meso-America and the Andes.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217 ; and SN 301  or SN 302 or SN 303  or SN 304  or SN 305  or SN 307  or SN 308  or SN 373 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 391 - Travel Writings of the New World

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the role of travel in colonial Spanish America and how it contributed in the creation of the idea of the New World. Special attention is placed on the "ways of seeing" of the authors who represented colonial territories and their inhabitants. Primary texts include works from the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, by authors with diverse backgrounds-military men and women, bureaucrats, businessmen, and scientists-like Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Catalina de Erauso "The Second Lieutenant Nun," Antonio de Ulloa, and Alexander Von Humboldt.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL
  
  •  

    SN 392 - Extirpation of Idolatries

    (3.00 cr.)

    Studies the practice of eliminating pre-Hispanic religious traditions in Peru and Mexico, beginning in the sixteenth century, as part of the Christianization process. Examines the religious conquest of Amerindian groups as a fragmentary process since many kept practicing activities that evoked their ancestral traditions, despite the Spanish efforts to change and even suppress them. Texts discussed include works from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries by Joseph Arriaga, S.J., Pedro Calderón de la Barca, Bernardino de Sahagún, O.F.M., Cristóbal Albornoz, and Father Diego Durán.

    Prerequisite: SN 203  or SN 217 ; and one additional SN 300-level course.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IL

Special Education

  
  •  

    SE 296 - Introduction to Special Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students identify and describe major philosophies, theories, and trends in the field of special education. Topics include cultural impact, delivery of service, and past to present knowledge and practices. For each area of disability, students become familiar with general information on physical and psychological characteristics; incidence and etiology; diagnostic and therapeutic services; interventions and educational programs; technology; and findings of recent research. Students demonstrate understanding of issues related to the assessment, identification, and placement of students with various exceptionalities. In addition, students are expected to identify the federal laws and regulations relative to rights and responsibilities, student identification, and delivery of services.

    Concurrent Requisite: ED 438  required for elementary education majors. ED 439  required for secondary education minors. ED 443  required for students who are not elementary education majors or secondary education minors.
  
  •  

    SE 482 - Assessment and Instructional Planning for Special Education

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students demonstrate understanding of the principles, ethics, and limitations of assessment, as well as the process of special education eligibility, progress evaluation, and dismissal. Students demonstrate understanding and knowledge of various formal and informal assessment instruments, their administration, and their interpretation. Students construct goals and objectives for students with learning and behavior problems by using assessment information and input from parents and other professionals. Students design adaptations and accommodations to meet unique needs. Emphasis is placed on linking assessment information to the designing of appropriate instructional programs that meet the unique needs of children with disabilities.

    Prerequisite: SE 296 .
  
  •  

    SE 483 - Collaboration and Consultation for Students with Special Needs

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore the various models of special education service delivery including inclusive education, resource services, team teaching, and consultation. Learners gain insight into the intricacy of collaboration with other professionals and families. Through the use of formal measures and self-reflection, students explore the factors that influence their ability to collaborate and refine their interpersonal communication skills. The multi-approaches to co-teaching are examined and students demonstrate effective co-planning and co-teaching practices. Students develop an empathetic understanding of the needs and concerns of families and cultivate skills to effectively assist and encourage active family participation in the educational process. Parent rights, ethical concerns, and professional boundaries are reviewed.

    Prerequisite: SE 296 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to elementary education majors, secondary education minors, or special education minors.

  
  •  

    SE 495 - Improving Access to the General Curriculum for All Learners

    (3.00 cr.)

    Educators are prepared to support the learning needs of students with disabilities or limited English proficiency in inclusive settings in grades 1-8. Specific evidence-based strategies for curriculum content acquisition (e.g., content enhancements, learning strategies, peer tutoring methods, Universal Design for Learning) are demonstrated and applied. Topics also include effective techniques for instructional planning and delivery, providing accommodations and modifications to the general curriculum, and improving student study skills and overall academic performance. The SETT framework is used to guide the evaluation and selection of assistive technology devices for specified purposes.

    Prerequisite: SE 296 .

Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences

  
  •  

    SP 102 - Introduction to Human Communication

    (3.00 cr.)

    Effective communication is a critical skill affecting most, if not all, areas of our personal and professional lives. In this first-year Messina course, the principles surrounding human communication are addressed, connecting them to basic processes of speech, language, and hearing. The impact of perception, difference, and language on human communication is explored and evaluated. Communication specific to gender, culture, and personal relationships is examined, culminating in an evaluation of ourselves and an exploration of others.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 103 - Introduction to Communication Disorders

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of the disorders of speech, language, and hearing in pediatric, adolescent, and adult populations. The role of the speech-language pathologist and audiologist in the identification and treatment of individuals with these disorders is addressed. Students learn the professional vocabulary and concepts that are the foundation for advanced courses in the department.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 200 - Professional Development in Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences

    (1.00 cr.)

    Introduces the scope of practice within the speech-language-hearing sciences through guest speakers who work in different areas of the fields. Additional focus on oral communication skills, resume writing, career discernment, and graduate school preparation. (Pass/Fail)

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 201 - Hearing Science and Acoustics

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to acoustics and psychoacoustics as they apply to hearing and the communication process. Detailed information on the anatomy and physiology of the human peripheral and central auditory mechanisms is provided. An in-depth study of the pathological conditions that can/may affect those mechanisms is presented.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 205 - Phonetics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn principles of speech sound production and use of the International Phonetic Alphabet for phonetic transcription. Normal rule-based variations in sound production are discussed, specifically as related to different dialects and idiolects. Students also learn auditory discrimination of speech sound productions with reference to diagnosing and treating speech disorders.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 206 - Observation Methods and Techniques in Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students gain knowledge and experience in clinical practice methods, both in the classroom and through outside clinical observations across a wide range of ages and variety of speech, language, swallowing, and hearing problems. In addition to scheduled lecture periods, students observe in the Loyola Clinical Centers, and a minimum of two off-campus settings. The course is writing intensive, as the development of students' preclinical writing is emphasized through a continuous editing process of observation reports. Formerly SP 306.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 207 - Speech and Language Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Covers typical speech and language development in children from birth through adolescence. Provides students with information regarding the phonological, morphological, semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic processes of normal speech and language development. Also explores specific acquisition sequences and the impact of social and cultural influences on communication development.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 214 - Introduction to Sign Language

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students master the basics of communicating with finger spelling and American sign. Coursework addresses the culture, politics, and history of the Deaf. Considers the impact of deafness on the individual, the family, and the community in relation to their psychological, sociological, and legal perspectives. American sign language and signed English are introduced.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 301 - Anatomy and Physiology: Speech and Voice

    (3.00 cr.)

    The study of the structures and functions that support the processes of normal speech and language. The speech systems of respiration, phonation, and articulation are studied in depth. There is an introduction to neuroanatomy as it relates to human communication and an introduction to swallowing.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 303 - Sociolinguistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    The field of sociolinguistics deals with the ways in which language serves to define and maintain group identity and social relationships among speakers. Students learn to describe relationships between language and society, including regional and social variation and gender differences. Language variations are compared through the lens of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 205 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SP 304 - Articulation and Phonological Disorders

    (3.00 cr.)

    Anatomical, physiological, neurological, and acoustic bases of speech sound disorders and phonological systems. Current theories and evidence-based practices in assessment and intervention related to phonological development, articulation, oral motor skills, childhood apraxia of speech, phonological processes, phonological awareness, social dialects, and bilingualism are addressed.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 205 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 308 - Professional and Technical Writing in Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students gain knowledge and experience in the area of professional writing for the field of speech-language pathology/audiology. This is a writing-intensive course where students develop skills for writing goals and objectives, individualized educational plans, and diagnostic reports. Students also learn the process for writing technical papers and are required to research and write a professional literature review. Collaborative assignments and projects help students understand the writing process. A service-learning and/or field experience may be included.

    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): SP 206 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 312 - Cultural Diversity in Communication

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the role and impact of communication in a multicultural society. The course specifically examines systems and characteristics of culture, as well as the role of perception and bias on intercultural communication. The students are required to examine their own biases and are expected to learn, expand, and develop more successful means of communication with members across a variety of societies. An optional service-learning experience may be included.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SP 314 - Intermediate Sign Language

    (3.00 cr.)

    Expands the student's sign language vocabulary and increases speed, accuracy, and fluency of sign language communication. Students give several signed presentations to the class. ASL word order and idioms are highlighted. Discussion of sign language interpreters and the laws governing interpreters in the fifty states are addressed. Lectures focus on deaf culture.

    Prerequisite: SP 214  or written permission of the undergraduate program director.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SP 340 - Clinical Audiology

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the assessment of the auditory and balance systems. Differential diagnosis of hearing disorders in children and adults, middle ear analysis, speech audiometric procedures, site of lesion assessments, electrophysiological auditory assessments, and behavioral auditory assessments are addressed. Students participate in lab exercises and clinical report writing to reinforce the lectures regarding the diagnostic procedures. Formerly SP 440.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 201 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 400 - Speech Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn advanced physiology and acoustics of speech and voice production, as well as current research and theory regarding speech perception. Technological advances in the measurement of the parameters of both normal and disordered speech and voice production are introduced. Collaborative laboratory sessions during which students analyze the acoustic properties of speech are included.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 201 , SP 205 , SP 301 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 401 - Neurology for Communication Sciences and Disorders

    (3.00 cr.)

    Normal neuroanatomical and physiological development from embryology through adulthood is explored. Neurology associated with speech, language, and cognition is emphasized. Neurological examination as related to the practice of speech-language pathology is discussed.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 201 , SP 207 , SP 301 .
    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): SP 308 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 405 - Child and Adolescent Communication Disorders

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores child and adolescent communication disorders through the lens of a strength-based approach including neurodiversity. Current research findings, traditional definitions, and portrayals of disorder through pop culture are used to better understand the physical, socio-emotional, and neurological bases of communication disorders.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 201 , SP 207 , SP 301 .
    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): SP 308 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 406 - Neurological Bases of Adult Communication Disorders

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of acquired neurological disorders in the adult population. An overview of normal neuroanatomy and neurophysiology is followed by topics: aphasia, right hemisphere disorder, traumatic brain injury, dementia, and motor speech disorders. Students engage in collaborative assignments including team-based experiential work with a cognitive screening tool and problem-based learning. Career choices in medical speech pathology are explored.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 201 , SP 301 .
    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): SP 308 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 412 - Clinical Seminar in Speech Pathology/Audiology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Weekly seminar sessions focus on clinical issues in speech-language pathology and audiology, as well as professional issues that relate to the field. Clinical case presentations and critical, timely activities are used.

    Prerequisite: SP 102 SP 206 , SP 308 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SP 413 - Assessment and Intervention in School-Age Children and Adolescents

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students gain knowledge about clinical methods and procedures in speech-language pathology. Specifically, professional topics include: ethics and licensure issues, diagnostic assessments for speech and language, and intervention for school-age children and adolescents. Simulated case studies and collaborative assignments and projects are used in instruction and in promoting critical thinking and problem-solving surrounding these topics.

    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): SP 308 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to junior and senior majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 414 - Advanced Intermediate Sign Language

    (3.00 cr.)

    Emphasis is placed on speed and cognition of finger spelling and sign language. Prepares student for advanced courses in AMSLAN. Proficiency in using sign as a means of expression and communication employed.

    Prerequisite: SP 214 , SP 314  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SP 416 - Independent Study in Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Enables students to pursue advanced study on topics of individual interest under faculty supervision. Admission by approval of department committee. May be repeated once for credit.

    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 417 - Clinical Research in Communication Sciences and Disorders

    (3.00 cr.)

    An overview of research theories and methods used in the field of communication sciences and disorders. Strategies for reading, understanding, and evaluating research literature for the purpose of becoming critical consumers are presented, and opportunities for exposure and involvement in research are provided.

    Prerequisite: SP 206 , SP 207 , SP 308 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 441 - Aural Habilitation

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the effects of hearing impairment on the communication abilities of adults and children. Adult social, emotional, and communication competency is addressed with a focus on conversational repair. Assessment and intervention strategies and amplification systems are highlighted, including hearing aids, assistive technology aids, and cochlear implants. Pediatric populations are covered including educational options, assessment, and intervention methods. An overview of syndromes associated with hearing impairment is presented. Students participate in collaborative learning assignments, working together to apply evidence-based practice supported interventions for mock clients and data sets. Students are challenged to listen to insights from others when completing projects as a team.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 201 , SP 340 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SP 443 - Clinical Practice in Audiology I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Supervised clinical practice; clinical experience at the on-campus clinical centers and off site screening settings. Students administer diagnostic procedures and produce clinical reports and document contact in client records. Students are expected to adhere to all HIPAA confidentiality guidelines. Clinical practice involves participation during the fall and/or spring terms. Written or electronic permission of the clinical placement director. Admission by application to the director of clinical placements in spring of junior year.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 201 , SP 206 , SP 340 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SP 444 - Clinical Practice in Audiology II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Advanced supervised clinical practice; clinical experience at on-campus clinical centers and off-site screening settings. Clinical practice involves advanced participation in clinical diagnostic and assessment procedures, as well as administering preventative hearing screenings. Students are expected to interpret results of audiological test procedures. Students are expected to adhere to all HIPAA guidelines regarding confidentiality. Written or electronic permission of the clinical placement director. Admission by application to the director of clinical placements.

    Prerequisite: SP 103 , SP 201 , SP 206 , SP 340 , SP 443 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
  •  

    SP 499 - Clinical Internship: Schools

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Students who have completed SP 413  are invited to enroll in this internship placement that is based upon availability. Students are supervised in a clinical placement that focuses on school-aged children. Students are instructed in areas including prevention, diagnostics and intervention of language, literacy, and phonological disorders. Students are responsible for developing treatment plans, including writing goals/objectives, as well as progress notes for the children with whom they work. Direct supervision is provided by an offsite supervisor. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. (Pass/Fail)

    Prerequisite: SP 413 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually


Statistics

  
  •  

    ST 110 - Introduction to Statistical Methods and Data Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introductory statistics course requiring no calculus. Statistical methods are motivated through real data sets. Topics include graphical summaries of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, chi-squared tests, regression model fitting, normal distributions, and sampling. Technology will be used. Closed to students working toward BS or BBA. Closed to students who have taken EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 291  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 .

    Interdisciplinary Studies: FO/GT
  
  •  

    ST 200 - Opportunities in STEM

    (1.00 cr.)

    The colloquium focuses on internships, research, and career options available to students in Computer Science, Physics, Mathematics, and Statistics (CPaMS) through speaker talks, career center workshops, and field trips to research and industry partners. This course is intended for natural and applied science majors.  Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Required for all CPaMS Scholars in their second year. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. Same course as CS 200 , MA 200 , PH 200 . (Pass/Fail)

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    ST 210 - Introduction to Statistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    A non-calculus-based course covering descriptive statistics; regression model fitting; probability; normal, binomial, and sampling distributions; estimation; and hypothesis testing. Degree credit will not be given for more than one of EG 381  or ST 210 or ST 265  or ST 381 . Closed to students who have taken EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 265  or ST 381 . 

    Prerequisite: MA 109  or a score of 48 or better on Part II of the Math Placement Test or one year of high school calculus.
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS/FO/GT/IDS/IFS
  
  •  

    ST 265 - Biostatistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    A non-calculus-based course covering descriptive statistics, regression model fitting, probability, distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Applications are geared toward research and data analysis in biology and medicine. Degree credit will not be given for more than one of EG 381  or ST 210  or ST 265 or ST 381 . Closed to students who have taken EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 210  or ST 381 . 

    Prerequisite: MA 109  or a score of 48 or better on Part II of the Math Placement Test or one year of high school calculus.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS/FO/IDS/IFS
  
  •  

    ST 310 - Statistical Computing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Reviews a number of statistics topics as a vehicle for introducing students to statistical computing and programming using SAS and R for graphical and statistical analysis of data. Statistics topics include graphical and numerical descriptive statistics, probability distributions, one and two sample tests and confidence intervals, simple linear regression, and chi-square tests. SAS topics include data management, manipulation, cleaning, macros, and matrix computations. Topics in R include data frames, functions, objects, flow control, input and output, matrix computations, and the use of R packages. Lastly, this course also includes an introduction to the resampling and bootstrap approaches to statistical inference. Required for statistics and data science majors.

    Prerequisite: ST 210  or ST 265  or EC 220 , or written permission of the department chair.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS/IDS
  
  •  

    ST 381 - Probability and Statistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Random experiments, probability, random variables, probability density functions, expectation, descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and simple linear regression. Degree credit will not be given for more than one of EG 381  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381. Same course as EG 381 .

    Prerequisite: MA 252 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Interdisciplinary Studies: FO/IFS
  
  •  

    ST 461 - Elements of Statistical Theory I: Distributions

    (3.00 cr.)

    Probability, discrete and continuous distributions, moment generating functions, multivariate distributions, transformations of variables, and order statistics.

    Prerequisite: EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 ; MA 351 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Even Years

    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
  •  

    ST 462 - Elements of Statistical Theory II: Inference

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of ST 461 . Theory of estimation and hypothesis testing, the central limit theorem, maximum likelihood estimation, Bayesian estimation, and the likelihood ratio test.

    Prerequisite: ST 461 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

  
  •  

    ST 465 - Experimental Research Methods

    (3.00 cr.)

    Concepts and techniques for experimental research including simple, logistic, and multiple regression; analysis of variance; analysis of categorical data.

    Prerequisite: EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 . 
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
  •  

    ST 466 - Experimental Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of ST 465 . The theory of linear models and its relationship to regression, analysis of variance and covariance. Coverage of interaction, blocking, replication, and experimental designs: split-plot, nested, and Latin squares.

    Prerequisite: MA 301 , ST 310 , ST 465 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Even Years

    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
  •  

    ST 471 - Statistical Quality Control

    (3.00 cr.)

    Quality has become an integral part of the lives of both the consumer and the producer. Covered topics include the ideas of W. Edwards Deming; six sigma; Shewhart concepts of process control; control charts for attributes and variables; CUSUM, EWMA, and MA charts; and factorial experimental designs.

    Prerequisite: EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 . 
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

  
  •  

    ST 472 - Applied Multivariate Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Applications of multivariate statistical methods, such as principal components, factor analysis, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, Hotelling's T-square, and multivariate analysis of variance. An applied journal article is read and summarized verbally, in written form, and in rewritten form. A final course project based on an original study is presented verbally, in written form, and in rewritten form.

    Prerequisite: EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Even Years

    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
  •  

    ST 475 - R Computing and Survival Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Topics include hazard functions, survival functions, types of censoring, contingency tables analysis, relative risk, odds ratios, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel methods, life table analysis, Kaplan-Meier methods, Cox proportional hazards models, and Poisson regression. Parametric methods and various nonparametric alternatives are discussed.

    Prerequisite: EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 ; ST 310 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Even Years

  
  •  

    ST 485 - Stochastic Processes

    (3.00 cr.)

    The fundamental concepts of random phenomena, including Bernoulli processes, Markov chains, Poisson processes, queuing theory, inventory theory, and birth-death processes. Applied and theoretical assignments, computer simulation. Same course as MA 485 .

    Prerequisite: EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 ; MA 301 . 
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

  
  •  

    ST 491 - Special Topics in Statistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Special topics in advanced statistics of interest to the instructor and the students. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Prerequisite: EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 . 
  
  •  

    ST 499 - Statistics Internship

    (1.00 cr.)

    Students gain a better understanding of statistics through work experience. Interns are required to work in a business or professional environment under the guidance of an on-site supervisor for a minimum of 100 hours. The work conducted during the internship must in some way relate to statistics or the application of the discipline to the business or professional environment. The location may be in- or out-of-state, on a paid or unpaid basis. Course requirements include a weekly work log, a scheduled performance evaluation signed by the on-site supervisor, and an updated résumé, and cover letter. Written or electronic permission of the instructor or department chair. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. May be repeated 3 times for credit.

    Restrictions: Restricted to statistics majors or minors.


Studio Arts

  
  •  

    SA 224 - Two-Dimensional Design

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn the essential elements of design through hands-on creation of artworks and verbal/written expressions of design concepts. Composition is addressed through employing the Elements of Art (line, shape, value, color, texture, and space) in combination with the Principles of Design (including movement, harmony, scale, and contrast). Students work with a range of media and learn to solve creative problems that include drawing, painting, and collage. Prerequisite for most studio arts courses. Requirement for visual arts majors with a concentration in studio arts and studio arts minors. Fulfills fine arts core requirement.

     

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 225 - Drawing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Through the education of hand and eye, students learn to draw in a manner that mirrors visual reality as well as to compose fully realized works that involve the imagination. Basic drawing principles and techniques are explored through line and tone in graphite, felt-tip pens, charcoal, and pastel on paper. Requirement for visual arts majors with a concentration in studio arts and studio arts minors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 226 - Three-Dimensional Design in Art and Engineering

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn the elements of three-dimensional design via interdisciplinary connections between the fields of studio art and engineering. The foundations of visual communication and spatial design are addressed through hands-on creation of artworks and verbal/written analysis of design concepts. Engineering drawing and solid modeling techniques and conventions are also covered within the context of computer-aided design (CAD) software. Students work with a range of studio art media and fabrication techniques throughout the course, including 3D printing. Fulfills fine arts core requirement. Same course as EG 226 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 303 - Life Drawing

    (3.00 cr.)

    A comprehensive introduction to the concepts and techniques for realistically and expressively drawing the human form. Skeletal and muscle sketches familiarize students with the structure of human anatomy leading to drawings of nude models. Media includes graphite, charcoal, ink, and pastel on paper.

    Prerequisite: SA 225  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 304 - Drawing with Color

    (3.00 cr.)

    Color as a vehicle for drawing and composing expressive imagery using colored pencils and inks. Subject matter drawn from nature and man-made forms.

    Prerequisite: SA 225  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 310 - Introduction to Painting

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to basic painting techniques and theory. Students work both from life and conceptually.

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 311 - Watercolor

    (3.00 cr.)

    An exploration of the techniques of watercolor painting. Through various projects involving composition, perspective, color theory, and creative experimentation, landscape, still life, figure, and abstraction take on a new meaning.

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or SA 225  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 312 - Abstract Painting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Looking at the tradition of abstraction in cubism, neoplasticism, abstract expressionism, color field painting, and minimalism, students create original works that focus on form, color, and texture. Through a series of painting explorations, critiques, field trips, and examination of work by well-known abstract artists, students gain a better understanding of what is meant by "content in abstraction."

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 313 - Portraits and the Figure

    (3.00 cr.)

    Using the technique of painting in a single sitting ("alla prima" or "wet into wet"), students learn to paint the human face and figure, working from life. The course covers the preparation of grounds and supports and understanding of the tools, techniques and concepts of life painting. Students are encouraged to experiment and to emphasize the tactile quality of paint, concentration, and keen observation.

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or SA 225  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 315 - Landscape

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores drawing and painting the landscape. Deals with naturalistic ideas, light being a primary concern. Students improve drawing and painting skills and media as they work in the classroom and at locations around the Loyola community. Slide lectures and a museum visit supplement outdoor sessions.

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IES
  
  •  

    SA 322 - Printmaking: Screenprint and Nontraditional Lithography

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the materials, techniques, concepts, and equipment used in planographic (drawing and painting based) and stencil printing methods. In the nontraditional lithographic method, hand-drawn and/or photographic images are exposed on plates that are printed uniquely, in multiple layers, and/or in editions. Screens allow the printing of solid colors and detailed digital imagery through stencils mounted on fabric.

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or SA 225  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 323 - Printmaking: Alternative Processes

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the materials, techniques, concepts, and equipment used in the practice of printmaking, with an emphasis on mixed media methods and monotype- the closest printmaking form to painting. Processes that can be done without a press and some transfer methods are included. Water- and oil-based, black and white, and color inks are used. Some prior drawing or painting experience is recommended.

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 326 - Graphics I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn basic concepts of file formats, bitmap picture editing, vector drawing, and page layout while developing skills in industry-standard computer graphics software tools. For visual journalists, designers, and media producers. Same course as CM 322 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 342 - Drawing from Observation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Through class work and independent assignments, the nature of observation and representation are the critical focus of this course. Working with a variety of drawing materials and conceptual formats, students explore subject matter and narrative with an emphasis upon observation. In successive projects designed to cultivate technical competence and conceptual autonomy, this course challenges students to develop a personal approach to space, form, composition, and content.

    Prerequisite: SA 225  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 343 - Drawing: A Conceptual Approach

    (3.00 cr.)

    For conceptual artists, the idea of a work of art matters as much–if not more–than its physical identity. In this course, students learn to produce drawings intended to convey an idea using both traditional and nontraditional media. Various artists' works that have influenced this art movement are studied as inspiration for students' creative solutions to assigned problems.

    Prerequisite: SA 225  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 352 - Collage, Assemblage, and the Found Object

    (3.00 cr.)

    Using found and altered materials, students are led from varied technical approaches for creating collages on/of paper through a range of conceptual approaches to design and content. Includes the altering and constructing of relief and three-dimensional, preexisting materials into works of art (assemblages and found object sculpture).

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 353 - Book Arts and Artists' Books

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to the materials, techniques, concepts, and equipment used in the craft of making traditional and nontraditional books. They learn folding, stitching, enclosing, and binding methods while creating three-dimensional works that literally or metaphorically reference the structure of books, address contemporary ideas about visual content, and exist as three-dimensional works of art. Same course as CM 349 /PT 353 .

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 354 - Mixed Media: Drawing and Painting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Building upon the drawing and painting base formed by foundation courses and personal experience, this course introduces many mixed media techniques and processes that can be used to expand one's ideas and expressions. Projects incorporate contemporary aesthetics, abstraction, and perceptual work. Techniques include, but not be limited to the use of transparency and layering, transfers of various kinds, and the creating of surfaces upon which to build content.

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 360 - Digital Mixed Media

    (3.00 cr.)

    A combination studio and digital photography course in which the computer is used as a tool and an integral part of the creative process, but work is achieved through mixed media studio methods. Two- and three-dimensional projects may include installation and/or virtual works that exist only on the Internet. Some prior computer experience recommended. Same course as CM 360  and PT 360 .

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 361 - Digital Image

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the ways in which the computer and various software programs can be used to modify and enhance an image as a visual statement for artistic and photojournalistic use. Same course as PT 361 .

    Prerequisite: PT 270  or PT 300  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 364 - Contemporary Digital Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students taking this course gain an understanding of contemporary artists focusing on new media, while developing their own digital art practice. Video, animation, sound, web-based artwork, 3-D, interactivity, and other media practices are addressed. Classes consist of research, discussion, studio projects, critiques, and written work. Same course as CM 364 /PT 364 .

    Prerequisite: CM 322  or SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
  •  

    SA 365 - Clay

    (3.00 cr.)

    Creativity and honesty in design is emphasized through handbuilding with clay. Students learn to make original works of glazed clayware and small sculptures using slab, coil, relief, and mold methods.

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

 

Page: 1 <- Back 10 ... 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18