2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Dec 08, 2021  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Latin

  
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    LT 365 - Roman Letters and Life

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students read Roman letters that reflect the full spectrum of the ancient Roman experience and represent some of the finest Latin prose, including Cicero's political rants and his love for his daughter; Pliny's descriptions of the destruction of Pompeii and the persecution of the early Christians; Seneca's response to the brutality of the Roman games; and the correspondence of Roman soldiers and their wives stationed on the frosty northern borders of the Empire.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 374 - Roman Satire

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the origin and development of the only literary form created by the Romans, with selections from Horace, Persius, and Juvenal.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    LT 375 - Latin Elegy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are introduced to the themes and conventions of Latin elegy via select poems of Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid (Amores, Ars Amatoria, Tristia). The course examines issues such as gender, genre, and the literary politics of Augustan Rome. It also situates elegy within its wider historical context through supplementary readings of love poetry from antiquity through the Renaissance and beyond.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 380 - Ovid

    (3.00 cr.)

    A reading of extensive selections from the brilliant poet of love and change; human psychology as seen through the lens of the classical myths.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II/IM
  
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    LT 385 - Vergil's Gentler Muse: The Eclogues and Georgics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Before Vergil sang of arms and the man, he composed the Eclogues and Georgics-poems no less masterful than the Aeneid, and equally influential within Western literature. Through select readings from these works, students examine Vergil's depiction of country life and love; the struggle to lead a good life in a harsh world; and the relations between man, nature, and society. These poems are also explored as a philosophical response to recent political crises in Rome.

    Prerequisite: LT 104   or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    LT 386 - Ovid's Metamorphoses

    (3.00 cr.)

    A reading of extensive selections from the brilliant poem of change; human psychology as seen through the lens of the classical myths.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II/IM
  
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    LT 390 - City as Text: A Literary Guide to Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore the city of Rome as reflected in Latin literary texts, and the cityscape itself as a text that conveys certain messages through its monuments. Drawing from the fields of art, archaeology, and literature, the course takes students on an imaginative tour of some of Rome's famous sites, examining why they were built, what they say, and how ancient authors responded to them and, in doing so, constructed themselves as Romans. Readings focus on the Augustan Age and may include selections from Ovid, Horace, Cicero, and Livy, among others.

    Prerequisite: LT 104  or equivalent.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Varies


Law and Social Responsibility/Business Law

  
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    LW 102 - Law and Social Justice

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students study contemporary, controversial issues that sit at the intersection of law and social justice (e.g. immigration reform, business ethics scandals). By engaging in lively, interactive, and challenging debates and exercises considering a range of topics, students are able to explore possible majors in communication, business, the social sciences, writing, and more. Students are inspired to think critically, understand responsible citizenship, and act against injustice.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer
  
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    LW 103 - Law and the City: Planning, Politics, and Justice

    (3.00 cr.)

    People shape, and are shaped by, the cities they inhabit. Every city looks, feels, and operates differently due to conflicting political, economic, and demographic pressures. How people use the law to construct their urban environments defines and distinguishes them from others. Examples are zoning laws, which divide, promote, and prohibit various activities within a city; criminal laws that shape the relationships between citizens and police; environmental laws that preserve and protect certain lands while concentrating the contamination of others; and municipal governance laws that allocate political power among residential neighborhoods and socioeconomic groups. An historical examination of how these laws have been used, and by whom, reveals examples of how the American legal system has, in some cases, perpetuated social injustice, and in others, been used as a tool for social justice and change. The laws and legal theories at the heart of urban development are critically examined to help students to better engage directly with these issues as active citizens.

    Interdisciplinary Studies: FO/IES/IFS
  
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    LW 104 - Criminal Law and Society

    (3.00 cr.)

    Criminal law is about a process by which evidence is gathered, organized, analyzed, and, if necessary, presented to a trier of fact to determine whether a defendant has committed a crime. This course considers principles of the law of crimes and proof of the criminal violation. More importantly, topics that sit at the intersection of law and justice are explored, making it clear that criminal law reflects the social setting in which it occurs. Does the government target certain groups for a disproportionate level of enforcement? Do prosecutors take into consideration the particular circumstances of the defendant's race, gender, social status, or economic situation in deciding whether conduct constitutes a crime? These and similar justice-based questions are considered.

    Interdisciplinary Studies: FO/IFS
  
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    LW 109 - Business, Law, and Society: Special Topics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides a foundation for students who wish to explore the role that law plays in social, political, economic, and cultural life as it pertains to business behavior. The coursework provides a foundation of knowledge regarding the basic concepts necessary to understanding how business operates, the rules of law, and the influences and effects of law on the social and economic system. The course goal is to provide students with an understanding of the nature and functions of law in society and how law influences business behavior.

    Interdisciplinary Studies: FO/IFS
  
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    LW 305 - Legal Environment of Business

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the legal environment of business activity. Students learn to explain basic legal terms; articulate legal rights and requirements in the managerial setting; identify how a particular legal issue fits into the legal system and how law develops and changes; and discuss managing an organization's legal matters, including ethical use of the law. Topics include classifications and sources of law, dispute resolution, agency, business associations, corporate governance, contracts, torts, product liability, securities, equal employment opportunity; and intellectual property.

    Prerequisite: 60 credits.
  
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    LW 350 - Restorative Justice and Criminal Law

    (3.00 cr.)

    The incarceration rate in the United States has reached one out of every one hundred adults. To many, such vast incarceration reflects the moral ills of innumerable individuals, as well as social injustices. Both restorative justice and Catholic social thought appear to agree that our society witnesses too much incarceration and too little healing of victims, offenders, and social consciousness. Restorative justice is a process to involve, to the extent possible, those who have a stake in a specific offense and to collectively identify and address harms, needs, and obligations in order to heal and put things as right as possible. Questions discussed: Can forgiveness play a role in criminal justice? Should a teenager be given a life sentence? Can linguists solve crimes that stump the police? Can society find new approaches to curb domestic homicide?

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    LW 406 - Commercial Law

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the legal aspects of a commercial transaction. Students learn to explain the nature of a commercial transaction including formulating a contract for the sale of goods, paying for the goods, and financing the transaction. Topics include contract law, the uniform commercial code (sale of goods, negotiable instruments, secured transactions, bank collections and deposits), surety, and bankruptcy.

    Restrictions: Restricted to seniors or written permission of the instructor.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    LW 409 - Special Topics in Law and Social Responsibility

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines a selected area of law with in-depth coverage of concepts and applications. Students engage in serious, focused research. Past topics include constitutional law, gender and the law, children and the law, sports law, and Internet law. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Prerequisite: 60 credits.
  
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    LW 410 - International Business Law

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the principal laws, legal sources, enforcement forums, and legal issues relevant to managing international business. Students learn to explain the legal framework for international business, as well as relevant U.S. law, treaty, and host country laws. Topics include legal framework for international business; international sales contracts, including CISG, carriage by sea, letters of credit, and dispute resolution; GATT, EU, NAFTA, and U.S. import/export laws, including procedures to challenge trade practices; licensing and protection of intellectual property; host country regulations affecting fair trade, financing, employment, environment, forms of business organization, and human rights relevant to business. Fulfills upper-level course requirement and substitutes for an area study course in international business concentration.

    Prerequisite: LW 305  or BH 305 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    LW 411 - Environmental Law and Policy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Surveys the statutes, regulations, and common law principles and policies that address a wide range of environmental problems. Also compares different approaches to resolving environmental problems, e.g., traditional regulations, pollution prevention, and ecological restoration.

    Prerequisite: 60 credits.
    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IES
  
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    LW 499 - Internship in Legal Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students are prepared for careers in law through practical work experience. Students become familiar with the legal practice of an internship sponsor and accomplish law-related projects working with a legal professional. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Offered only on an independent study basis.

    Prerequisite: LW 305  or BH 305 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to seniors.


Literacy

  
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    RE 219 - Processes and Acquisitions of Literacy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Assists students in understanding the reading acquisition process. Course content is organized around current accepted research-based theoretical models that account for individual differences in reading. The Maryland State Department of Education has approved this course for the Processes and Acquisition requirement.

  
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    RE 242 - Materials for Teaching Reading

    (3.00 cr.)

    Addresses selection and evaluation of print and electronic texts and identification of strategies used when teaching reading at children's instructional and developmental levels. The Maryland State Department of Education has approved this course for the Materials for Teaching Reading requirement.

    Restrictions: Restricted to elementary education majors.

  
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    RE 344 - Assessment and Instruction in Reading I with Field Experience

    (4.00 cr.)

    Addresses a variety of reading instruction methods and assessment measures for primary age children. A main focus of the course is to develop an understanding of how word recognition strategies develop and lead to comprehension. The Maryland State Department of Education has approved this course in conjunction with RE 420  for the Instruction in Reading and Assessment of Reading requirements. A field experience in a school setting is required.

    Prerequisite: RE 219 ; RE 242  or written permission of the instructor.
    Restrictions: Restricted to elementary education majors.

  
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    RE 420 - Assessment and Instruction in Reading II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Addresses a comprehensive array of instructional and assessment techniques and strategies for independent readers with specific attention to comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency. The Maryland State Department of Education has approved this course in conjunction with RE 344  for the Instruction in Reading and Assessment of Reading requirements.

    Prerequisite: RE 219 , RE 242 , RE 344 ; or written permission of the instructor.
    Restrictions: Restricted to elementary education majors.

  
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    RE 474 - Teaching Reading in the Content Area I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces a wide variety of strategies which use reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing to support content learning. Particular attention is given to the development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and writing strategies for all learners including struggling readers and English Language Learners. The Maryland State Department of Education has approved this course for the required Reading in the Content Area I course.

    Prerequisite: ED 205  or written permission of the instructor.
  
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    RE 475 - Teaching Reading in the Content Area II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Further explores the research and application that addresses literacy as a tool for negotiating and comprehending content area material. Students revisit and add to a wide range of literacy based content area strategies. Particular attention is given to the instruction/assessment cycle, uses of technology, and supporting diverse learners. The Maryland State Department of Education has approved this course for the required Reading in the Content Area II course.

    Prerequisite: RE 474 .

Management

  
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    MG 100 - Introduction to Business

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides a basic understanding of business activity, including the language of business (definitions, concepts, and principles) and practical exercises related to business functions. Students learn to read a financial report and discuss the activities and decisions of the business functions. Topics include the context of business (economic, ethical, international, and uncertainty), as well as the importance, terminology, and activities of marketing, accounting, finance, human resources, teams, production, and business reporting.

  
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    MG 201 - Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Develops knowledge and skills in the management of organizational behavior. Topics include wealth creation, personality, motivation, leadership, planning, teamwork, ethics, and employee development. Teaching methods may include lectures, cases, team decisions, and discussion. Testing methods may include exams, papers, and team projects.

    Restrictions: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors.

  
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    MG 402 - Business Policy

    (3.00 cr.)

    As a capstone experience for business and accounting majors that also integrates the functional areas of business, students focus on developing an overall management viewpoint and are exposed to a variety of perspectives on, approaches to, and tools for the conduct of strategic management. Through completion of strategic analyses and a strategic audit, students develop their capacities to describe, apply, and draw and defend conclusions from strategic analysis tools, summarize, present and discuss strategic topics and issues, and identify, understand, analyze and evaluate the strategies of businesses.

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , MG 201  or BH 201 MK 240  or BH 240 .
    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): FI 320  or BH 320 , LW 305  or BH 305 , OM 330  or BH 330 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to senior accounting or business administration majors.

  
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    MG 404 - Managing Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    (3.00 cr.)

    This course merges content from entrepreneurship and global strategy to examine concepts and techniques about how innovation and entrepreneurship stages progress, how they are shaped by today's global economy and its increasing demand for adoption of sustainable practices, how they shape an organization's collaboration strategy, and how development of an entrepreneurial mindset and design thinking supports operationalization of innovative business decisions. Formerly IB 482  or MG 403 .

    Prerequisite: MG 201  or BH 201 , and 60 credits.
    Restrictions: Restricted to junior or senior business administration majors with a concentration in international business or management, or international business minors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MG 405 - Managing Human Resources

    (3.00 cr.)

    Merges content from human resources and cross-cultural exchnges to examine the fundamental concepts and techniques for acquiring, developing, motivating, and managing a competent, diverse, innovative, and global work force. Topics include labor market conditions, the legal environment, recruitment and selection, training and development, compensation and benefits, labor relations, and employee retention.
      Formerly IB 472  or MG 411 .

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , MG 201  or BH 201 , and 60 credits.
    Restrictions: Restricted to junior or senior business administration majors with a concentration in international business or management, or international business minors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MG 406 - Managing Teams

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines concepts and techniques for how to effectively engage in collaborative behaviors, set conditions for effective teamwork, manage high-performance teams, and facilitate flexible, responsive team solutions to problems. Methods include lectures, guest speakers, exercises and simulations, case studies, and team projects.
      Formerly IB 471 .

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , MG 201  or BH 201 , and 60 credits.
    Restrictions: Restricted to junior or senior business administration majors with a concentration in international business or management, or international business minors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MG 407 - Managing Corporate Strategy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the emerging practice of Corporate Strategy, which involves management of what is often called "intrapreneurship," which is the application of entrepreneurial capabilities to the development of new ventures and innovative ideas within an existing firm. Topics include the consulting process, strategic management of technology, and other relevant areas. Case studies and readings will be used throughout culminating in an internal case competition that may be judged by faculty and local professionals, to prepare students to engage in and manage such processes in their careers.
      Formerly IB 429 .

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , MG 201  or BH 201 , and 60 credits.
    Restrictions: Restricted to senior business administration majors with a concentration in international business or management, or international business minors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MG 412 - Leading Change

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students develop a better understanding and practice of leadership through examination of the theory, research, and practice of effective leadership in a global, diverse world; the need for and development of leadership as part of the effective management of organizations; and the personal characteristics, behavioral styles, transformational, and other current models of leadership.

    Prerequisite: MG 201  or BH 201 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MG 415 - International Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Investigates business policy, strategy, structure, and process in an international context. Focuses on the international business environment and management practices outside the United States. Students develop an understanding of the complex and varied role of the general manager in a nondomestic environment. Topics include the international environment; the role of the general manager overseas; and global strategies, policies, and processes. Same course as IB 415 .

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , IB 282  or BH 282 , MG 201  or BH 201 . 
  
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    MG 419 - Special Topics in Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Readings and discussions in selected areas of management. Topics might include productivity management, career planning and development, small business management, organizational change and development, legal liabilities of managers, critical thinking, and R&D management. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Prerequisite: 60 credits.
  
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    MG 451 - Global Social Entrepreneurship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Develops student knowledge and interest in social entrepreneurship. Social entrepreneurship is the social innovation process of applying sound business and entrepreneurial practices to solve social problems, empower people, and reduce poverty. The course uses lectures, videos, research articles, and student projects and presentations to build student knowledge and aptitude for social enterprise. Deliverables include presentations, papers, participation, and projects.

    Prerequisite: 60 credits.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    MG 452 - Power and Influence

    (3.00 cr.)

    Identifies sources of power and influence and analyzes the use of power to influence and achieve personal and organizational goals. Personality and experience often lead to the differences in interpretations of how power is used in organizations. Often new employees look to their own supervisors to shelter them from organizational politics and then the employees themselves become the pawns of political power. As organizations are political entities, this course analyzes choices regarding how objectives and strategies are made primarily on the basis of who has power and how that power is used.

    Prerequisite: MG 201  or BH 201 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MG 499 - Management Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Combines practical work experience with applied classroom work and projects. Individual internship placements for found for students. Students must complete a minimum of 150 hours working at the organization/business on projects and activities assigned by the supervisor. Scheduled performance reviews are completed by the student's supervisor. Classroom projects include: multiple networking assignments related to the internship placement, conducting and submitting a written industry analysis, weekly written reports integrating learning from completed coursework and the internship, reading a specialized "readings list" related to the industry of the student's placement, and developing an updated resume and cover letter at the end of the internship. Written or electronic permission of the department chair or instructor.

    Prerequisite: MG 201  or BH 201 .

Marketing

  
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    MK 240 - Marketing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students acquire an understanding of marketing's role in helping an organization create value. Students learn to identify the elements of the marketing mix, recognize how these elements can be integrated to achieve organizational objectives, and describe a product's marketing plan. Topics include market research, consumer behavior, market segmentation, targeting, positioning, and the marketing mix-product, promotion, pricing, and distribution.

    Restrictions: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors.

  
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    MK 346 - Consumer Behavior

    (3.00 cr.)

    Considers multiple perspectives on consumer behavior, including psychological and sociological, and highlights how understanding consumers can inform marketing strategy. Considers the many facets of consumers as unique individuals and decision makers, the social and cultural influences on consumer behavior, and the ethical responsibility of marketers.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors.

  
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    MK 349 - Customer Experience Management: The Disney Study Tour

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students examine Customer Experience Management (CXM). Considered the new battlefield for business, CXM deals with how businesses design and manage their touchpoints with customers. The goal is to not only satisfy customers at one touchpoint, but to delight and excite them throughout their entire experience journey. As a result, customers may become repeat patrons and active advocates for the brand. The course consists of classes at Loyola followed by a study tour at Walt Disney World (Orlando) - a world leader in CXM. At Disney, students get a first-hand and behind-the-scenes look at CXM and are taught by Disney professionals. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. A fee is charged, amount varies.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors with a cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    MK 415 - Digital Marketing and Analytics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Digital marketing and analytics are indispensable in modern marketing. Social media, CRM, direct marketing, content creation and distribution, communications, and brand management are all technology dependent, and produce data that marketers depend on to make decisions. This course introduces students to marketing technology platforms, such as Marketo™ (direct marketing), SalesForce.com™ (CRM), Adobe Omniture™ (web analytics), social media analytics, and analytic tools like Iconosquare™ (Instagram), Tableau™ or PowerBI™. Students connect the dots between technology tools and strategy, data, analytics and insights; providing them with the knowledge and skills necessary for a career in marketing.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MK 440 - Selling Concepts and Strategies

    (3.00 cr.)

    Develops personal sales effectiveness through focusing on customer orientation and a needs-based philosophy of client service. Examines the processes involved in business-to-business selling as well as the roles and responsibilities of sales representatives. Students learn to apply the strategies and enhanced interpersonal skills required in the selling of products, services, and ideas. Topics include relationship management, prospecting and sales planning, needs development, and adaptive selling.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MK 441 - Marketing Research

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the role of information in marketing decision making. Students learn to collect, analyze, interpret, and apply information from primary and secondary data sources. Topics include problem definition, secondary data, experimental design, focus groups, survey research, questionnaire design, and data analysis. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches are covered, with emphasis on managerial implications. The course aims to engage students with marketing research methods by considering examples and applications, along with the challenges of conducting research in the real world.

    Prerequisite: EC 220  or ST 110  or ST 210  or ST 265  or equivalent, MK 240  or BH 240 
    Restrictions: Restricted to senior business administration majors with a concentration in marketing or marketing minors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MK 442 - Strategic Marketing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores marketing's role in creating value for the firm and its stakeholders. Examines marketing strategy in the context of global competition and strategic uncertainty. Focuses on the strategic and analytical approach to making marketing decisions. Builds analytical skills in diagnosing marketing problems, identifying opportunities, analyzing alternative courses of action, and recommending market strategies and action plans. Students evaluate, formulate, and implement marketing strategy across the product life cycle.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to seniors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MK 444 - New Product Development and Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Studies innovation in terms of developing and marketing new products. Students learn the stages of a new product development process, identify the components of new product development strategy, and understand how to structure organizations for creativity and innovation. Topics include managing new product failure, multivariate statistical techniques like factor analysis and cluster analysis, and technology-based new product development.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MK 447 - Integrated Marketing Communication

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides a broad introduction to Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC). Students develop an understanding of how to plan and implement an IMC program in a business or nonprofit organization. Topics include IMC planning, advertising principles, media planning, digital marketing, sales promotion, public relations, and regulatory issues in marketing communications.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MK 448 - Socially Responsible Marketing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Ethical decision making in marketing requires complex trade-offs that include consideration of immediate and long-term costs and benefits to the decision maker, the organization, customers, the community, and the world. Students develop the reasoning capabilities to effectively make such decisions.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MK 449 - Special Topics in Marketing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides an opportunity for students to study contemporary marketing topics. Each topic incorporates an in-depth understanding of theoretical concepts and practical applications. Potential topics include health care marketing, financial services marketing, and nonprofit marketing. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MK 450 - Branding and Packaging

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides an in-depth understanding of how branding and packaging are used to gain the target audience's attention in the competitive retail environment. Students learn to utilize product packaging as a critical strategic element for brand identity and differentiation. Key topics include brand recognition, branding a service, consumer research, brand extensions, emotional branding, global brands, legal issues, and store brands versus national brands. Case analysis is used to reinforce topics and develop analytical skills by examining the branding strategy of current industry leaders. Possible case studies include Mr. Peanut as a brand icon; Ritz-Carlton's segmentation strategy; Tide's environmentally friendly packaging; Branding the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Summer Olympics; Oreo Cookie Turns 100; Brand Management at Panera Bread; Branding Las Vegas Internationally; and Risks and Rewards of a Celebrity Endorser.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MK 451 - Retail Marketing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the strategic role of retailing in the distribution of consumer goods and services. Students learn why consumer insight and superior execution are critical factors for building retail brands that will be successful in the future. Key topics include retail formats, multichannel retailing, merchandise assortments, retail locations, holiday sales trends, supply chain management, customer relationship management, pricing, store layout and design, retail communication mix, and customer service. Case analysis is used to reinforce course topics and develop analytical skills by examining the retailing strategy of leaders in the industry such as 1-800flowers.com, Bass Pro Shops, Buycostumes. com, Costco, Home Depot, Kohl's, Macy's, Nordstrom, Patagonia, Pizza Hut, Subway, Target, Tesco, Walgreens, Walmart, and Whole Foods.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MK 452 - Services Marketing

    (3.00 cr.)

    The United States, as well as much of the world economy, is dominated by services. In the United States, approximately 80 percent of the labor force and 78 percent of the gross domestic product is accounted for by services. The primary theme of the course is that service organizations require a distinctive approach to marketing strategy-both in its development and execution. Ideas from MK 240  or (BH 240 ) and other marketing courses are expanded to make them specifically applicable to service industry settings. Key topics include applying the seven Ps to services, determining customer expectations and perceptions, designing services, managing customer relationships (CRM), delivering and performing services, and analyzing financial and economic effects of services.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
  
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    MK 453 - Sports Marketing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides students with a foundation and basic understanding of the marketing of sports and the marketing through sports. Topics include investigating the role of sports at various levels; for example, amateur and professional levels and domestic and international levels. Students learn to understand and appreciate the development of sports marketing, along with its impact on current industry practices.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 , and 60 credits.
    Restrictions: Restricted to business administration majors with a concentration in marketing or marketing minors.

  
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    MK 499 - Marketing Internship

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prepares students for careers in marketing through practical work experience and in-class discussion. With the assistance of the instructor, students select an internship site. They become familiar with the sponsor's marketing function and accomplish marketing related projects by working with a marketing professional for 150 hours. This experience is summarized in an internship resume for use in the job search process. Topics for class discussion include marketing career paths, marketing competencies sought by employers, time management, harassment in the workplace, resume writing, networking, and other topics focusing on professional success and self-development in the marketing environment. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: MK 240  or BH 240 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to juniors or seniors.


Mathematics

  
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    MA 004 - Review of Math for College

    (0.00 cr.)

    Sets of real numbers, polynomials, algebra of fractions, first degree equations, and inequalities in one variable; exponents, radicals, complex numbers, graphing equations, and inequalities in two variables; systems of equations; and other selected topics. Does not satisfy mathematical sciences core requirement.

  
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    MA 103 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers: Algebraic

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides an inquiry-based examination of basic concepts, operations, and structures occurring in numbers, number sense, and algebraic reasoning. Students develop a deeper understanding of the numeric, arithmetic, and algebraic concepts required to teach elementary school mathematics. Does not fulfill mathematics and statistics core requirement.

    Restrictions: Restricted to elementary education majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MA 104 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers: Geometric

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides an activity-based exploration of informal geometry in two and three dimensions as well as probability and statistics. Emphasis is on visualization skills, fundamental geometric concepts, the analysis of shapes and patterns, and analyzing and displaying data. Students develop a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts required to teach mathematics in elementary school. Does not fulfill mathematics and statistics core requirement.

    Restrictions: Restricted to elementary education majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MA 109 - Precalculus

    (3.00 cr.)

    For students intending to take Calculus (MA 151  or MA 251 ) whose mathematical background is insufficient as determined by the placement test. Reviews algebra including factoring, exponents, and radicals; equations and inequalities; functions and relations including algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Does not satisfy mathematics and statistics core requirement.

    Prerequisite: MA 004  or a score of 56 or better on Part I of the Math Placement Test or a math SAT score of 560 or better or a math ACT score of 24 or better.
  
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    MA 114 - Mathematics of Sustainability

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on critical thinking and how to support arguments quantitatively in the context of sustainability. Topics include measurement, flow, connectivity, change, risk, and decision making. How to model sustainability at the local, regional, and global level is studied. Closed to students who have credit for MA/ST 200-level courses.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
  
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    MA 115 - Introduction to Combinatorics

    (3.00 cr.)

    A basic introduction to counting and its relationship to combinatorial structure. Topics may include sets, enumeration, permutations and combinations, probability, graph theory - colorability, planarity, and trees. Closed to students who have credit for MA/ST 200-level courses.

  
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    MA 116 - Topics in Modern Math: Ciphers and Codes

    (3.00 cr.)

    The mathematical basis of elementary ciphers and codes including substitution ciphers, public key ciphers, and RSA system. Topics include elementary number theory and modular arithmetic. A graphing calculator will be used.

    Prerequisite: Written or electronic permission of the instructor is required for students who have credit for MA 251 .
  
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    MA 117 - Mathematics, Numbers and the Real World

    (3.00 cr.)

    The nature of mathematical reasoning and the concept of proof in relation to concrete problems. Topics may include inductive reasoning, deductive reasoning, various number systems and their history, everyday arithmetic, financial management, introductory probability, and statistics. Topics are often discussed with a view toward practical applications and interesting real world examples. Closed to students who have credit for MA/ST 200-level courses.

  
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    MA 118 - History of Mathematics

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of the development of mathematical ideas throughout history, with emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving from the historical point of view. Topics include the historical development of numbers, calculations, geometry, algebra, and the concept of infinity in various civilizations, with specific emphasis on developments in Europe, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, India, and China. Connections are explored between the history of mathematics and other fields such as natural and applied sciences, social sciences, and business.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    MA 119 - Special Topics in Modern Math

    (3.00 cr.)

    Special topics in elementary mathematics. Topic varies depending on interest of the instructor. Closed to students who have credit for MA/ST 200-level courses. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

  
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    MA 151 - Applied Calculus

    (3.00 cr.)

    A one semester introduction to calculus. Definition, interpretation, and applications of the derivative especially in business and social sciences. Degree credit will not be given for both MA 151 and MA 251 . Closed to students minoring in mathematics or statistics.

    Prerequisite: MA 109  or a score of 48 or better on Part II of the Math Placement Test or one year of high school calculus.
  
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    MA 200 - Opportunities in STEM

    (1.00 cr.)

    The colloquium focuses on internships, research, and career options available to students in Computer Science, Physics, Mathematics, and Statistics (CPaMS) through speaker talks, career center workshops, and field trips to research and industry partners. This course is intended for natural and applied science majors. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Required for all CPaMS Scholars in their second year. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. Same course as CS 200 , PH 200 , ST 200 . (Pass/Fail)

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
  
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    MA 251 - Calculus I

    (4.00 cr.)

    A rigorous approach to Calculus for all majors. Topics include limits, definition, interpretation, and applications of the derivative; differentiation rules; antiderivatives; definition of definite and indefinite integrals; and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Degree credit will not be given for both MA 151  and MA 251.

    Prerequisite: MA 109  or a score of 56 or better on Part II of the Math Placement Test or one year of high school calculus.
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS/FO/IFS
  
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    MA 252 - Calculus II

    (4.00 cr.)

    A continuation of MA 251 . Techniques and applications of integration; improper integrals; parametric equations and polar coordinates; sequences and series.

    Prerequisite: At least a C- or better in MA 251 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: FO/IFS
  
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    MA 295 - Discrete Structures

    (3.00 cr.)

    Boolean algebra, combinatorics, inductive and deductive proofs, sets, graphs, functions, and recurrence relations. Same course as CS 295 .

    Prerequisite: CS 151  or CS 201; MA 109  or a score of 56 or better on Part I of the Math Placement Test or one year of high school calculus.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
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    MA 301 - Introduction to Linear Algebra

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the basics of matrices, linear transformations, and vector spaces along with selected applications. Topics include linear independence, dimension, solutions of linear systems, eigenvalues, and diagonalization. Applications are drawn from areas such as computer graphics, input-output analysis, and least squares. The computer package MATLAB is introduced and used throughout the course.

    Prerequisite: MA 252  or CS 295  or MA 295 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
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    MA 302 - Programming in Mathematics

    (3.00 cr.)

    The basics of MATLAB programming are covered through the investigation of various mathematical topics, including functions, conditional statements, loops, and plotting.

    Prerequisite: CS 151  or CS 201.
    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): MA 301 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to mathematics or statistics majors.

  
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    MA 303 - Discovering Information in Data

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students use tools for acquiring, cleaning, analyzing, exploring, and visualizing data. This course teaches students how to make data-driven decisions and effectively communicate results. A major component of this course is learning how to use python-based programming tools to apply methods to real-life datasets including those that arise from physics applications. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Fulfills the natural science core requirement. Does not count toward the computer science, data science, and/or physics minors for mathematics majors. Closed to students who have taken CS 403 , DS 303 , or PH 303 . Same course as CS 403 , DS 303 , PH 303 .

    Prerequisite: CS 151 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
  
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    MA 304 - Ordinary Differential Equations

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to ordinary differential equations. Techniques for solving and analyzing first and second order differential equations, both linear and nonlinear; systems of differential equations. Qualitative and numerical methods as well as closed form solutions are emphasized, and mathematical software is used. No computer experience necessary.

    Prerequisite: MA 351 , or MA 252  and written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
  
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    MA 351 - Calculus III

    (4.00 cr.)

    A continuation of MA 252  into multivariable calculus. Topics include vectors, lines, planes, and surfaces in three dimensions; vector functions and their derivatives and integrals; partial derivatives, gradients, directional derivatives, maxima, minima, Lagrange multipliers; multiple integrals, area, volume, surface area, integration in different coordinate systems. Line integrals, Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem and the divergence theorem are also studied.

    Prerequisite: At least a C- or better in MA 252 .
  
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    MA 395 - Discrete Methods

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to proof writing, with topics drawn from logical compound statements, natural numbers, mathematical induction, set theory, functions, relations, counting arguments, permutations, combinations, and probability. Problem solving is stressed.

    Prerequisite: MA 252 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: DS
  
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    MA 421 - Analysis I

    (3.00 cr.)

    A rigorous development of topics in calculus, and a systematic study of basic analysis with an emphasis on formal proofs. Topics include properties of the real line, sequences, series, theory of limits, continuity, theory of differentiation, and integration of functions of one variable.

    Prerequisite: MA 395 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
  
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    MA 422 - Analysis II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of MA 421 . Possible topics include theory of integration of functions of one variable, improper integrals, series, functions of several variables, and metric spaces.

    Prerequisite: MA 351 , MA 421 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Even Years

  
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    MA 424 - Complex Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Geometry of complex numbers, complex functions, analytic functions, harmonic functions, contour integration, Cauchy's Integral Formula, Laurent series, residue theory, conformal mappings.

    Prerequisite: MA 351 .
  
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    MA 427 - Numerical Analysis

    (3.00 cr.)

    Emphasizes the development of numerical algorithms to provide stable and efficient solutions to common problems in science and engineering, along with MA 428 . Topics include direct and iterative methods appearing in linear algebra, root finding methods, and interpolation.

    Prerequisite: MA 301 , MA 302 , or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Even Years

  
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    MA 428 - Computational Mathematics

    (3.00 cr.)

    This course, along with MA 427 , emphasizes the development of numerical algorithms to provide stable and efficient solutions to common problems in science and engineering. Topics include numerical differentiation, initial value problems, two point boundary value problems, and partial differential equations.

    Prerequisite: MA 302 MA 304 , or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

  
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    MA 431 - Geometry

    (3.00 cr.)

    A review of Euclidean geometry and an introduction to non-Euclidean geometry. Rigorous deduction and axiom systems are emphasized. Possible techniques include the use of coordinate geometry, linear algebra, and computer geometry systems.

    Prerequisite: MA 395 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Even Years

  
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    MA 437 - Combinatorics

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to combinatorial objects, calculations, and techniques of proof. Topics may include bijective counting, multisets and multinomial coefficients, partitions, sequences, generating functions, the inclusion-exclusion principle, distributions, and partially ordered sets.

    Prerequisite: MA 351  or written permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MA 441 - Ring Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    An investigation of the fundamental algebraic systems of integers, rings, polynomials, and fields. Topics drawn from homomorphisms, cosets, and quotient structures.

    Prerequisite: MA 301 , MA 395 .
  
  •  

    MA 442 - Group Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    An investigation of the fundamental algebraic system of groups. Topics include homomorphism, cosets, and quotient structures. May include applications, Sylow theory, combinatorics, coding theory, Galois theory, etc.

    Prerequisite: MA 301 , MA 395 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

  
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    MA 443 - Polynomial Algebra

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of theoretical and applied problems on polynomials. Topics may include polynomial rings and ideals, affine varieties, Groebner bases, elimination theory, splines, robotics, and the combinatorial structure of monomial ideals.

    Prerequisite: MA 301  and MA 395 .
  
  •  

    MA 445 - Advanced Linear Algebra

    (3.00 cr.)

    A deeper study of matrices and their applications, diagonalization, canonical forms, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, perturbation of matrices, computational algorithms.

    Prerequisite: MA 301 .
  
  •  

    MA 447 - Number Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    Integers, divisibility, Euclid's algorithm, Diophantine equations, prime numbers, congruences, including quadratic reciprocity and Euler's phi-function. Additional topics to be chosen by the instructor.

    Prerequisite: MA 395 .
  
  •  

    MA 448 - Graph Theory

    (3.00 cr.)

    The fundamentals of graphs are discussed. Topics may include graphs, trees, connectivity, Eulerian circuits, Hamiltonian cycles, vertex and edge colorings, planar graphs, and extremal problems.

    Prerequisite: MA 395  or written permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MA 481 - Operations Research

    (3.00 cr.)

    Linear programming and related techniques of combinatorial optimization with applications. Includes the simplex algorithm, transportation, optimal assignment, network flow, shortest path and travelling salesperson problems.

    Prerequisite: MA 301 .
  
  •  

    MA 483 - Numerical Optimization

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the theory and algorithms that arise in nonlinear finite-dimensional optimization. Topics include line-search and trust region methods, quasi-Newton methods, and conjugate gradient methods.

    Prerequisite: MA 301 , MA 302 .
  
  •  

    MA 485 - Stochastic Processes

    (3.00 cr.)

    The fundamental concepts of random phenomena, including Bernoulli processes, Markov chains, Poisson processes, queuing theory, inventory theory, and birth-death processes. Applied and theoretic assignments, computer simulation. Same course as ST 485 .

    Prerequisite: EC 220  or EG 381  or PY 292  or ST 210  or ST 265  or ST 381 ; MA 301 . 
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

  
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    MA 489 - Techniques of Mathematical Modeling

    (3.00 cr.)

    Covers basic mathematical tools for quantitative descriptions of practical problems arising from physics, biology, economics, and engineering. Mathematical models are an important way of obtaining quantitative solutions to these problems. Emphasis is on the formulation, analysis, and testing of mathematical models through some elementary examples and effective communication of quantitative results. Topics include modeling change by difference equations, curve fitting, modeling with differential equations, modeling by graph theory, and linear programming.

    Prerequisite: MA 302 , MA 351 .
  
  •  

    MA 490 - Special Topics in Mathematics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Special topics in advanced mathematics of interest to the instructor and students. Varies from semester to semester. Recent topics include coding theory, topology, optimization, geometry, and an honors seminar. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Prerequisite: Varies with topic.
  
  •  

    MA 499 - Mathematics Internship

    (1.00 cr.)

    Students gain a better understanding of mathematics through work experience. Interns are required to work in a business or professional environment under the guidance of an on-site supervisor for a minimum of 100 hours. The work conducted during the internship must in some way relate to mathematics or the application of the discipline to the business or professional environment. The location may be in- or out-of-state, on a paid or unpaid basis. Course requirements include a weekly work log, a scheduled performance evaluation signed by the on-site supervisor, and an updated résumé, and cover letter. Written or electronic permission of the instructor or department chair. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement. May be repeated 3 times for credit.

    Restrictions: Restricted to mathematics majors or minors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

Military Science

  
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    MS 099 - Leadership Lab

    (0.00 cr.)

    Provides an environment for practicing leadership skills taught in the classroom and hands-on training with military equipment. Corequisite for all other military science courses. (Pass/Fail)

  
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    MS 101 - Leadership and Personal Development

    (3.00 cr.)

    Cadets are introduced to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and Army operations. Focus is placed on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions while gaining a big picture understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Health, wellness, and fitness instruction occurs outside the classroom. For nondegree credit. Open enrollment.

    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
  •  

    MS 102 - Introduction to Tactical Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    An overview of leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Cadets explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Health, wellness, and fitness instruction occurs outside the classroom. For nondegree credit. Open enrollment.

    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
  •  

    MS 103 - Intensive Independent Military Study

    (3.00 cr.)

    Permits a student to do close and vigorous study on a military topic not available in the regular curriculum. Heavy research, reading, and writing are normally required and specifics of the assignments are determined by the student and instructor. For nondegree credit. Open enrollment. Written or electronic permission of the department chair.

    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
  •  

    MS 201 - Innovative Team Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    Cadets explore the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by studying historical case studies and engaging in interactive student exercises. Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises. Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of rank, uniform, customs, and courtesies. Leadership case studies of recent global events provide tangible context for learning the Soldier's Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Health, wellness, and fitness instruction occurs outside the classroom. For nondegree credit. Open enrollment.

    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
  •  

    MS 203 - Intensive Independent Military Study

    (3.00 cr.)

    Permits a student to do close and vigorous study on a military topic not available in the regular curriculum. Heavy research, reading, and writing are normally required and specifics of the assignments are determined by the student and instructor. For nondegree credit. Open enrollment. Written or electronic permission of the department chair.

    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
  •  

    MS 209 - Foundations of Tactical Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the challenges of leading teams in the complex contemporary operating environment (COE). The course highlights dimensions of the cross-cultural challenges of leadership in a constantly changing world and applies these to practical Army leadership tasks and situations. Health, wellness, and fitness instruction occurs outside the classroom. For nondegree credit. Open enrollment.

    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
 

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