2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Dec 04, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Military Science

  
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    MS 301 - Adaptive Team Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    Cadets are challenged to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive tactical leadership skills as they are presented with challenging scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, as well as their own self-evaluations, cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities. The overall focus is aimed toward developing tactical leadership abilities to enable cadets to succeed at the ROTC summer Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC).

    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
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    MS 302 - Applied Team Leadership

    (3.00 cr.)

    Increasingly intense situational leadership challenges are used to build cadet awareness and skills in leading tactical operations up to platoon level. Cadets review aspects of combat, stability, and support operations. They also conduct military briefings and develop proficiency in garrison operation orders. The focus is on exploring, evaluating, and developing skills in decision making, persuading, and motivating team members in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Cadets are evaluated on what they know and do as leaders as they prepare to attend the ROTC summer Leader Development Assessment Course (LDAC).

    Prerequisite: MS 301 .
    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
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    MS 303 - Intensive Independent Military Study

    (3.00 cr.)

    Permits a student to do close and vigorous study on a military topic not available in the regular curriculum. Heavy research, reading, and writing are normally required and specifics of the assignments are determined by the student and instructor. Many select assignments, such as embedded reporter, operations officer, recruiting and retention, or communications systems engineering officer. Written or electronic permission of the department chair. Taken in lieu of MS 301  or MS 302 .

    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
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    MS 401 - Developing Adaptive Leaders

    (3.00 cr.)

    Develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations; functioning as a member of a staff; and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel processes prepare cadets to make the transition to Army officers. Cadets analyze, evaluate, and instruct cadets at lower levels. Classroom and leadership experiences are designed to prepare cadets for their first unit of assignment. Cadets identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles, and use situational opportunities to teach, train, and develop subordinates.

    Prerequisite: MS 301 , MS 302 .
    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
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    MS 402 - Leadership in a Complex World

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the contemporary operating environment. Cadets use recent events to examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. Significant emphasis is placed on preparing cadets for their first unit of assignment. Case studies, scenarios, exercises from recent global events are used to prepare cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned officers in the U.S. Army.

    Prerequisite: MS 401 .
    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .
  
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    MS 403 - Intensive Independent Military Study

    (3.00 cr.)

    Permits a student to do close and vigorous study on a military topic not available in the regular curriculum. Heavy research, reading, and writing are normally required and specifics of the assignments are determined by the student and instructor. Most select assignments, such as operations or logistics officer, are very demanding and only for those overachievers. Written or electronic permission of the department chair. Taken in lieu of MS 401  or MS 402 .

    Concurrent Requisite: MS 099 .

Modern Languages

  
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    ML 111 - Study Abroad Immersion Research Project

    (0.00 cr.)

    All students studying abroad through a Loyola program or exchange are required to complete an immersion research project. Students may choose to participate in a well-documented community service project while abroad or complete an independent research portfolio on their interaction with their host cultures. The project must be submitted to the Office of International Programs no later than 30 days after the student's program abroad ends. May be repeated once for credit. (Pass/Fail)

    Restrictions: Restricted to students participating in a Loyola study abroad program or exchange.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    ML 201 - Exploring Language: An Introduction to Linguistics

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the rule-based nature of language. Includes the study of basic English structures (morphological, phonological, syntactic) and practice in analyzing them. Other languages will also be used as examples depending, in part, on the interests and preparation of the students. Further topics covered are the relationship between writing and speaking; the idea of "correctness" in language; language change and variation in social and historical contexts; language and communication; and the concept of language in popular thought.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    ML 250 - Introduction to Medieval Literature: Selected Languages

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of selected medieval texts, read in English translation, with readings on the culture and civilization of the times. Representative works in each of the major genres are read: the lyric, the epic, and other narrative genres.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IM
  
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    ML 301 - Modern Chinese Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Since the late nineteenth century, China has witnessed a history of radical transformations. Literature in modern and contemporary China became a battleground for competing political, cultural, and aesthetic discourses. Through a close reading of the literary texts and a review of the socio-historical background, this course provides diverse approaches to understanding the ever changing lives of the Chinese people. Issues of tradition, religion, family, gender, etc., are reexamined within the context of reform, revolution, and modernization in China. Films based on literary works with English subtitles are occasionally shown. All materials are in English translations.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IA
  
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    ML 303 - Germany through Film and Video

    (3.00 cr.)

    An overview of the landmarks of German cinema. The course examines the social, political, and economic changes in Germany since 1945 and relates them to developments within the European Union. Consideration is given to films that portray the relationship between foreign workers and migrants to the host culture. Closed to students who have taken GR 303 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    ML 305 - Dungeons, Dragons, Damsels in Distress

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the medieval epic in literature and film. Students study selections of medieval German, French, and Italian epic. They also compare the major epics to their filmed versions and examine popular stereotypes about the knights, women, love, and war in the Middle Ages. Lectures on the culture of the times are included. Same course as GR 305 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IM
  
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    ML 306 - Old Wine in a New Bottle: Modern Film and Classical Chinese Tales

    (3.00 cr.)

    Modern films adapted from premodern Chinese historical and literary works connect the past and present, and sometimes also China and the West. By examining famous stories and their cinematic representations, students investigate how these films demonstrate the value of the past in contemporary society, and how they have influenced society's understanding of the cultural past of China. Selected historical, literary, archaeological, and cinematic works are used to analyze the origin and development for each story. The course aims to help students understand the relationship between film and textual discourses, past and present, as well as China and the West. Films and television series are provided with English subtitles. All readings are in English. No prior background in the subject matter is required.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IA/IF/IM
  
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    ML 307 - Topics in Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore and discuss the norms, values, and beliefs of their own and other culture(s) to gain a better understanding of the world in the age of globalization. Literary texts, non-fiction texts, films, documentaries, student presentations, and lectures by scholars and experts from other cultures are used to help students to gain an awareness of the cultural diversity in a globalized world community. By studying the cultural "output" of cultures other than their own, students gain a clearer understanding of the forces that drive a particular culture. Some of the topics compared include the role of religion and tradition in shaping family values, social and political structures, education, and social classes. CCLS majors and minors should take this course in the junior or senior year.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT
  
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    ML 308 - Introduction to Comparative Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on the nature and function of literature with particular emphasis on the degree to which a certain piece of literature is influenced by, or influences, the cultural milieu in which is was written. The works studied are drawn from a variety of cultures, including a number of African and Asian traditions, and a variety of styles and media—from poems, novels, and plays to films, propaganda, and web publishing.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    ML 309 - Gender, Peace, and Justice in East Asia: Texts and Context

    (3.00 cr.)

    Provides a survey on the gendered representations and experiences in East Asia (China, Japan, North Korea, and South Korea), as well as in other Asian regions and countries. Situating East Asian men and women in both regional and global contexts, this course investigates how gender in East Asia has been (re)constructed, (re)institutionalized, (re)appropriated, as well as (re)interpreted in different socio-historical discourses and/or under the global influence.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IG/IPJ
  
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    ML 310 - Introduction to Traditional Chinese Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    The unique features of Chinese literature, society, and culture are introduced through the examination of masterworks of history, literature, philosophy, and the arts in order to help students understand the origins and development of Chinese culture, as well as its influence on modern society. All written works are provided in English translation.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IA/IM
  
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    ML 311 - Language and Identity

    (3.00 cr.)

    Language both determines and is an expression of identity. The connection between the construction of social identity and language use within the context of the United States is investigated. Students explore how discourse is structured to shape the identity of various ethnic groups (e.g., Black, Native, Asian, and Latin Americans), examining common language myths and evaluating the language stereotypes and attitudes reflected in books, film, newspapers, advertisements, etc.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    ML 315 - Popular Culture in Contemporary China: Transformation, Consumption, and Exchange

    (3.00 cr.)

    Critically examines popular culture and everyday life in Chinese society and the cross-cultural significance between China and the West in the context of globalization. Students study film to literature, music to fashion, and culinary arts to entertainment. They investigate the historical, sociopolitical, and aesthetic impacts of selected cultural topics through assigned readings and videos, in-class discussions, a field trip, and interactions with Chinese people. Students also become familiar with major themes, values, and concerns in Chinese culture, and they are able to apply appropriate methodologies and approaches for critical analysis of cultural texts. Keeping a reflective journal each week, students present the journal portfolio as part of the final project. No prior knowledge about China or the Chinese language is required.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IA
  
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    ML 320 - Liberation Theology from Its Origins

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the origins of liberation theology during the Renaissance, comparing European and Latin American paradigms developed in association with the European conquest of the Americas. The course concludes with a liberation theologian from the twentieth century. Themes studied are mortality; charity versus charity; charity and justice; God versus the Church; the nature of the soul; temporal power; spiritual power; division of power; virtue; theology and history; the Gospels; the evangelization of Native Americans; the Counter-Reformation; the Church; Utopian visions (Saint Thomas More, Erasmus, Las Casas, and Guamán Poma de Ayala); immanence and transcendence; and revolutionary appropriations of Christ. Taught in English. Materials are read in translation; however, students who desire to read them in the original languages (Latin, German, French, Spanish) may do so.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/IL
  
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    ML 324 - Representations of Women in Premodern Chinese Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the different ways women are portrayed in premodern Chinese literature, varying from instruments for male expression, to objects of the male gaze, to individuals with their own thoughts. By comparing representations of women by both male and female writers, students are able to trace the overall evolution of the female figure in this literature and to analyze how the speaker's gender influences the conception of this figure. Through an analysis of the historical and social context of each work, students can explore more concretely the relationship between gender and political power. Attention is also paid to the way class and regional differences influence the images of women. Readings are in English.

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , one HS 100-level course, and WR 100  or WR 101.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IA/IG/IM
  
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    ML 330 - Bargaining with the Devil: The Faust Legend in Literature, Film, and Music

    (3.00 cr.)

    The legend of a pact with the devil has long served as a metaphor for the desire to surpass the limits of human knowledge and power at any cost. Starting with the sixteenth-century Faust Book—which recounts the story of a scholar, alchemist, and necromancer who sold his soul to the devil—to the most recent cinematic, musical, and literary versions of the devil's pact, this course explores man's enduring fascination with the forbidden: evil, devil worship, witchcraft, magic, and sexuality.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    ML 332 - Dante's Divine Comedy (in translation)

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of Dante's major opus. Focuses on the historical, political, and philosophical aspects of Dante's masterpiece. Appreciation of Dante's place in world literature. Lectures in English with bilingual text. Knowledge of Italian helpful but not necessary. Closed to students who have taken IT 352 .

    Prerequisite: EN 101 , WR 100  or WR 101.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IC/II/IM
  
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    ML 333 - Topics in Italian Renaissance Literature

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to a specific aspect of Italian Renaissance literature in its social, cultural, and historical context. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.

    Prerequisite: HS 101 , WR 100  or WR 101.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II/IM
  
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    ML 334 - The Continuing Allure of Magic: Fairy Tales from Perrault and Grimm to Walt Disney

    (3.00 cr.)

    Close reading of fairy tales to ascertain their meaning and purpose within the sociohistorical context of the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries; examination of the Perrault and Grimm tales against the background of the literary currents of their times; comparison of traditional fairy tales with modern rewrites, with Walt Disney versions, and with contemporary fairy-tale theatre productions (videos). Interpretation of fairy tales from the anthropological, psychological, sociological, and political perspectives.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    ML 340 - China through Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores Chinese culture through award-winning movies recently produced in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and other Chinese-speaking communities. Lectures and discussions focus on the representations of Chinese history, family, and society and further examine how the Chinese identity is constructed in these movies. Aesthetic styles and cinematic themes are also investigated. Meanwhile, the shifting dynamics between China and the West propose more critical questions on Chinese film as entertainment and its commercialization in an age of globalization. No prior knowledge of Chinese history, culture, film, or the Chinese language is required. Taught in English.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IA/IF
  
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    ML 341 - Contemporary German Cinema

    (3.00 cr.)

    The course offers a brief overview of classic German cinema and its contribution to the art of filmmaking, with its main focus being the development of German cinema from 1960 to the present. Students view and discuss works by von Trotta, Fassbinder, Herzog, Petersen, Tykwer, Becker, Tim, and Akin, and they investigate the films' relation to the societal, historical, and political developments in contemporary Germany and Europe. No German necessary.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IF
  
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    ML 342 - From Plymouth Rock to Ellis Island: An Examination of Immigration to America

    (3.00 cr.)

    The United States has long been known as a nation of immigrants. Most current residents originally came from someplace else, or at least their forebears did. This course examines immigration primarily as a cultural phenomenon, focusing on the process and its impact on the individual immigrant. Students investigate the political, social, and economic conditions which may have motivated someone to leave his or her native country, as well as the adjustments a person had to make upon arrival in North America. Students also have an opportunity to consider the subject from the vantage point of their own family background.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    ML 362 - The Early Latino Experience in the United States

    (3.00 cr.)

    Traces early Latino experiences and history in the lands that would become the United States. Three milestones are included: the first encounters between the Spanish and indigenous Americans during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; the Anglo incorporation of California, New Mexico, and Texas, during which Spanish-speaking peoples suddenly found themselves to be citizens of the English-speaking United States; and the first Pan-American conference (the origins of the Organization of American States), when Puerto Ricans and Cubans began to realize that their struggle for independence from Spain was being diverted and that they, like the upper-Californians, were coming under United States control.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IL/IU
  
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    ML 365 - Home Here and Abroad: Why It Matters So Much

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the creation and evolution of the idea of home in different cultures and specific literary texts. In order to better understand what we call home, students analyze how the concepts of private life, intimacy, and comfort evolved at different times in different cultures and literatures. Once this is defined, the course analyzes how foreigners perceive our home, how their perception often differs from ours, how we see their home, and what it takes to create a new home.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT
  
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    ML 366 - The Holocaust in French Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    Discusses how the Holocaust and the persecution of the Jews were represented in French film from 1939 to the present. Students analyze how, at different times of their evolution, French cinema and French society have answered the questions: What happened? Who is responsible? How can we be sure we will never forget? The films analyzed include masterpieces such as Night and Fog, The Sorrow and the Pity, Hotel Terminus, Shoah, M. Klein, Goodbye Children, and Weapons of the Spirit. Closed to students who have taken FR 345 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IF
  
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    ML 380 - Italy and Italians in Today's World

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of Italian issues in Europe and the world, with history and culture being of primary concern. Students are encouraged to view these diverse realities through the lens of their major discipline, linking the language and culture studied with their major discipline, the courses taken in the minor, and study abroad. Includes readings, films, videos, and a final paper about an issue concerning Italian Studies examined in an interdisciplinary manner.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: II
  
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    ML 392 - Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of Latin America and Latino issues in the United States, with history and culture being of primary concern to determine how identities and nations are constructed and how they interact with each other. Students are encouraged to view these diverse realities through the lens of their major discipline. Closed to students who have taken HS 392 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IL
  
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    ML 400 - Medieval Studies Capstone Project

    (1.00 cr.)

    An independent study accompanying a concurrently taken three-credit elective approved for the Medieval Studies minor. The interdepartmental subject and title must be approved by the instructor and Medieval Studies Consortium. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Medieval Studies minors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IM
  
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    ML 401 - CCLS Capstone Paper

    (1.00 cr.)

    An independent study accompanying a concurrently taken, three-credit elective approved for the CCLS major. Students research and write a senior project paper integrating the course topic into the specific orientation chosen for their comparative studies. Written or electronic permission of the CCLS director. Topics must be approved by the CCLS director, in consultation with the CCLS Committee and the course instructor.

    Restrictions: Restricted to CCLS majors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

  
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    ML 404 - Another America, Central America

    (3.00 cr.)

    This course focuses on and compares contemporary Guatemala, Nicaragua, and El Salvador. Topics for discussion include the continuing Spanish conquest and indigenous resistance to it; military dictatorships and genocide; U.S. interventions; social revolutions; and the rise of gang violence. Readings range from fiction and poetry to personal testimony and social science statistical research. Closed to students who have taken SN 304 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: GT/IL
  
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    ML 426 - The Teaching of Foreign Languages

    (3.00 cr.)

    Addresses the teaching guidelines and the expectations established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and the World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages. Students examine current methodologies, techniques, and educational goals for the teaching of foreign languages. Throughout the course, students develop lessons and activities that support an integrated foreign language program. Students also observe and evaluate foreign language classes. Students may also have opportunities to participate in classroom teaching. Maryland Core Learning Goals and Outcomes are introduced and reinforced along with the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards. One of the six methods courses is required for secondary school teachers by the Maryland State Department of Education. Same course as ED 426 .

    Prerequisite: One foreign language course beyond 104-level or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Odd Years

  
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    ML 440 - Special Topics in Latin American and Latino Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive investigation into a specific aspect of Latin American history, politics, culture, or literature. Topic announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Varies

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IL

Music

  
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    MU 110 - Class Piano

    (3.00 cr.)

    Group instruction in piano technique and repertoire for the beginning student. Covers basic skills including music reading. Students work both in groups and individually.

    Restrictions: Restricted to beginning students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 118 - Voice Class I

    (1.00 cr.)

    An introduction to basic skills for beginning singers, including mechanics of breathing and posture, knowledge of vocal anatomy, health and care of the voice, vocal exercises and warm-ups, performance skills, and basic sight-singing skills (solfeggio). Songs are individually assigned. An audition with the voice program director. Enrollment limited to six students. A fee is charged for private instruction and is payable directly to the instructor.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 119 - Voice Class II

    (1.00 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 118  with more emphasis on sight-singing skills, song preparation, communication of text, application of vocal techniques for assigned songs, stage deportment and dress, and performance anxiety management. Includes individual work with students during class and a recital for invited guests at the end of the semester. Enrollment limited to six students. A fee is charged for private instruction and is payable directly to the instructor.

    Prerequisite: MU 118 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 120 - Classical Guitar Class

    (3.00 cr.)

    Group instruction in technique and repertoire of the classical guitar. Emphasis is on music reading and securing a good foundation for further study.

    Restrictions: Restricted to beginning students.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 201 - Music Fundamentals

    (3.00 cr.)

    Develops in the student an awareness of some of the systems within music: acoustical, tonal, rhythmic, melodic, harmonic, and formal, and how they relate in an inseparable way to make music. An integrated approach-hearing, seeing, writing, and performing-is the goal. Fulfills fine arts core requirement.

     

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 203 - The Art of Listening

    (3.00 cr.)

    Introduces students to the major styles, genres, and works in the western art music tradition through guided listening. Students learn about the cultural contexts and aesthetic aims behind some of the most popular works still performed in concert halls today. Students apply the skills and lessons from the musical past, including the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic eras, to their own musical lives and become more perceptive and informed listeners. The ability to read music is not a prerequisite. Fulfills fine arts core requirement.

     

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 204 - Western Musical Traditions

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the major forms and styles in the western musical tradition, with an emphasis on guided listening of masterworks and the study of issues in musical aesthetics through scholarly and primary source texts. Aims to develop a more perceptive and informed listener and to introduce skills in music scholarship. Recommended for majors and minors as a replacement for MU 203 . Fulfills core requirement. Closed to students who have taken MU 203 . Same course as HN 322 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 205 - Musicianship I

    (1.50 cr.)

    Using systematic approaches to sight singing and aural dictation, students develop skills to perform music more accurately and musically. Students also develop the ability to dictate melodic and harmonic intervals, rhythms, whole melodies, chord qualities, and harmonic progressions.

    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): MU 201  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 206 - Musicianship II

    (1.50 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 205 .

    Prerequisite: MU 205  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 207 - Musicianship III

    (1.50 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 206 .

    Prerequisite: MU 206 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 208 - Musicianship IV

    (1.50 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 207 .

    Prerequisite: MU 207  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 209 - Special Topics: Musical Training

    (1-3.00 cr.)

    Intensive private instruction in more than one instrument. Written or electronic permission of the music director. May be repeated eight times for credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 210 - American Musical Theatre: Uptown and Down

    (3.00 cr.)

    Studies the variety found in American musical theatre, including musical drama, opera, and musical comedy. Through readings, recordings, and video tapes, students investigate this lively art. At least one live performance is viewed during the semester. Same course as DR 210 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

    Interdisciplinary Studies: IU
  
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    MU 211 - Jazz Ensemble I

    (1.50 cr.)

    The Loyola Jazz Ensemble is open to all instrumentalists by audition. Repertoire includes masterworks of jazz and original compositions. Students are given opportunities for solo playing. An audition with the instructor. Students should be able to read a chart. May be repeated for credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 217 - Scenes for Singers

    (1.50 cr.)

    Instruction to develop ensemble skills in solo singers and in pianists interested in working with singers. Participants are assigned partners with whom they prepare chamber duets and trios by composers such as Schumann, Mendelssohn, and Vivaldi. Some American musical theatre repertoire may be included. Weekly meetings (1.5 hours) and an additional 1.5-hour rehearsal are required, with a recital given at the end of the semester. An audition with the instructor. A fee is charged for private instruction and is payable directly to the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 220 - Chamber Ensemble I

    (1.50 cr.)

    Provides performance opportunities for instrumentalists who wish to play as soloists or as members of small groups (two to eight players). Concerts are performed both on and off campus. An audition with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 221 - Loyola Singers I

    (1.50 cr.)

    The Loyola Singers is a mixed ensemble that performs a varied and challenging program of choral music from all stylistic periods. Some solo opportunities are available. The choir performs several times throughout the semester at venues both on- and off-campus. An audition with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 230 - Classical Guitar Ensemble I

    (1.50 cr.)

    Designed for classical guitarists to perform in small groups of two to eight players. Participants are grouped according to level of ability, and music from the classical repertoire is rehearsed and studied. There are performance opportunities each semester. Open to students, faculty, and staff by audition. May be repeated for credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 231 - Steel Pan Ensemble I

    (1.50 cr.)

    Repertoire from Trinidad and Tobago. Panorama, transcription, calypso, soca, latin, jazz, ragtime, classical, and island favorites are performed with a full steel pan orchestra. An audition with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 301 - Passion and Grace: Music of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

    (3.00 cr.)

    In 1600, the musical baroque was born. This new genre featured music of unprecedented emotion and passion. As it grew, new forms were added; it eventually evolved into the classical style which emphasized grace, poise, and balance. This remarkable development is traced with a focus on Monteverdi, Bach, Haydn, and Beethoven.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 302 - Structure of Music: Theory I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Music theory encompasses the study of melodic and harmonic practices common in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Focuses on comprehension through the development of skills including exercises, drills, ear-training, sight-singing, and analysis as well as lecture.

    Recommended Prerequisite: MU 201  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 303 - American Jazz

    (3.00 cr.)

    Traces the origin and development of a truly American musical phenomenon: jazz. Topics include prejazz, ragtime, New Orleans and Chicago jazz, big band, bop, and contemporary styles. Discusses the effect of jazz on the popular music of the time.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 304 - Music and Medicine

    (3.00 cr.)

    The intersection of music and medical history is examined. Topics include: Why was music considered a medicine against plague? Why were opera composers fascinated by tuberculosis? How did Barney the Dinosaur and Bruce Springsteen become instruments of torture? Open to all students. Music majors and minors have additional technical readings and assignments.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 305 - Music in the Twentieth Century

    (3.00 cr.)

    The most significant musical revolution in 300 years took place at the beginning of the twentieth century. What was the revolution? How and why do we need to listen to new music in a different way? These questions are addressed as the course investigates the music of Debussy, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Copland, Glass, and others.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 306 - World Music: Common Ground, Separate Sound

    (3.00 cr.)

    Music is a worldwide phenomenon; however, there is no common musical language. Each culture develops its own instruments and musical traditions which reflect that culture's needs and resources. Indeed, the very function of music changes from culture to culture. This course focuses on the music of non-Western cultures, principally India, Pakistan, Bali, West Africa, and the altiplano region of Peru/Ecuador.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 307 - Music of the Romantic Period

    (3.00 cr.)

    A comprehensive survey of nineteenth century Western art music, including social, political, and philosophical issues of the period which impacted the composers and their lives. Grading based on a series of listening/written exams as well as class participation.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 309 - Opera and Theatre

    (3.00 cr.)

    Many operas are based on great literary and dramatic sources. Details the transformation of these works from spoken drama to musical setting. Traces the works' origins citing direct parallels, dissimilarities, omissions, condensations, and the musical conventions of opera. Addresses the association of librettist and composer. Compares various performances, both historic and current, and discusses the benefits and drawbacks of opera on film. Same course as DR 309 .

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 310 - Structure of Music: Theory II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Third music theory course in the curriculum. Students begin working with advanced techniques of analysis and composing short works. Topics include modulation, melodic development, and chromatic harmony.

    Prerequisite: MU 302 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 311 - Jazz Ensemble II

    (1.50 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 211 . An audition with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of MU 211 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 312 - Jazz Improvisation I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Helps the student become a more musical improviser principally in the jazz idiom through a four-pronged approach which involves listening, theory, practice, and performance. Students study, play, and transcribe great jazz solos and invent new melodies. Covers the development of a basic vocabulary for improvising. Examines rhythm in jazz and improvisation in the Major, Dorian, Mixoljdian modes and the Blues scale.

    Prerequisite: MU 201  or MU 302  or MU 310  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 313 - Music Performance Workshop

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores effective programming, preparation, and performance. Topics include choosing repertoire, arranging, rehearsal techniques, and program annotation. The course culminates in an on-campus performance. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Counts once toward the music major or minor; may be repeated for free elective credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 315 - Conducting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students study the art of conducting. Topics include score preparation, conducting, and rehearsal techniques. Students work with choral and/or instrumental ensembles in preparation for performance.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 320 - Chamber Ensemble II

    (1.50 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 220 . An audition with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of MU 220 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 321 - Loyola Singers II

    (1.50 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 221 . An audition with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of MU 221 
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 322 - Jazz Improvisation II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of the development of the student as a more musical improvisor. Examines II, V, I progressions; basic jazz forms and rhythm changes; the Locrian and Aeolian modes; and the minor, diminished, and whole tone scales.

    Prerequisite: MU 312 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 323 - Jazz Combo

    (1.50 cr.)

    An instrumental jazz group of four to eight players, representing the top jazz musicians on campus. The combo performs repertoire from lead sheets, requiring performers to create arrangements collectively and to develop a musically mature improvisational language. Members must be active in the jazz ensemble. An audition with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Concurrent Requisite: MU 211  or MU 311 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 324 - Composition

    (3.00 cr.)

    Student study the process of musical composition by examining masterworks and by completing a series of composition assignments and original works. Assignments progress from basic melody writing, through two- and three-part writing, to multivoiced works for piano or small ensemble.

    Prerequisite: MU 302 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 325 - Counterpoint

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students study the art of imitative and nonimitative counterpoint by studying examples of polyphonic music from the baroque to the present. Exercises focus on specific aspects of contrapuntal writing and the creation of original contrapuntal works.

    Prerequisite: MU 302 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 326 - Songwriting and Arranging

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students study the popular idiom of songwriting. Topics include melody writing, lyric setting, the melody/harmony connection, the production of a lead sheet, copyright procedures, and basic arranging. The works of such popular songwriters as Gershwin and Porter are considered.

    Recommended Prerequisite: MU 201  or MU 302  or MU 310 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 327 - Repertory Choir

    (1.50 cr.)

    The Repertory Choir is a smaller ensemble that specializes in a repertoire of specific genres, periods, and composers selected each semester. The choir frequently performs ensemble from musical theatre. Participants must also be active members of the Loyola Singers. An audition with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Concurrent Requisite: MU 221  or MU 321 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 330 - Classical Guitar Ensemble II

    (1.50 cr.)

    Designed for classical guitarists to perform in small groups of two to eight players. Participants are grouped according to level of ability, and music from the classical repertoire is rehearsed and studied. There are performance opportunities each semester. Open to students, faculty, and staff by audition. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of MU 230  or an audition with the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 331 - Steel Pan Ensemble II

    (1.50 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 231 . May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisite: MU 231 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 350 - Recording Studio I

    (3.00 cr.)

    In this hands-on course, students work in Loyola's recording studio and learn the art and craft of live and studio multi-track recording. Students are assigned a number of projects to gain an understanding of fundamental principles and attain facility with recording equipment, techniques, and software applications. Through the study and application of the proper and creative use of these elements, students learn how the recording process not only documents the creation of expressive music but is also an integral part of that creation. The primary goal is to enable each student to produce articulate and expressive musical works through the digital process.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 351 - Recording Studio II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 350 . Focuses on the application of advanced techniques in digital recording. Students complete recording assignments in live stereo recording, studio tracking, mixing, equalization, the use of effects, and basic mastering. The primary goal is to provide students with a broader technical and artistic foundation from which to produce articulate and expressive musical works of very high quality through the digital process.

    Prerequisite: MU 350  or written permission of the instructor.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 355 - Special Topics in Music

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive investigation of a special topic of music, music history, performance, or creation. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. May be repeated twice for credit with different topics.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 370 - Applied Music (1/2 hour)

    (1.00 cr.)

    Private instruction in musical instruments and voice. Each lesson is one-half hour per week with independent practice as prescribed by the teacher. Formerly MU 218. A fee is charged for private instruction and is payable directly to the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 375 - Applied Music (1 hour)

    (2.00 cr.)

    Private instruction in musical instruments and voice. Each lesson is one hour per week with independent practice as prescribed by the teacher. Formerly MU 219. A fee is charged for private instruction and is payable directly to the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 380 - Applied Music (1/2 hour)

    (1.00 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 370  or MU 375 . Formerly MU 318. A fee is charged for private instruction and is payable directly to the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of MU 370  or MU 375  and a passed jury. Permission is granted by the coordinator of the music program.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 385 - Applied Music (1 hour)

    (2.00 cr.)

    A continuation of MU 370  or MU 375 . Formerly MU 319. A fee is charged for private instruction and is payable directly to the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of MU 370  or MU 375  and a passed jury.Permission is granted by the coordinator of the music program.
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
    Years Typically Offered: Annually

  
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    MU 412 - Senior Project in Music

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students develop an advanced project under the direction of a faculty member. Work on the project continues throughout both semesters of the student's senior year. Written or electronic permission of the department. Proposals for senior projects must be approved by the fine arts faculty during the spring semester of the student's junior year.

    Restrictions: Restricted to Seniors.

    Sessions Typically Offered: Varies
    Years Typically Offered: Annually


Operations

  
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    OM 330 - Operations Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Develops the processes by which organizations create value. Students develop an overview of the planning and operation of systems using resources to convert raw materials, components, etc. to goods and services consumed by end customers. Topics include operations strategy, design of processes, product and process quality, global competition and supply chain issues, productivity of operating systems, impact on societal and physical environment, and both qualitative and quantitative methods to improve decision making.

    Prerequisite: EC 102 , EC 220 , IS 251  or BH 251 MA 151  or MA 251  or equivalent. 
  
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    OM 334 - Global Supply Chain Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Deals with managing the flow of physical goods, services and information within national and international supply chains. Discusses the challenges of global supply chain relationships, such as outsourcing and off shoring and the corporate and web technologies needed to purchase, distribute and transport goods and services.

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , OM 330  or BH 330 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring
  
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    OM 335 - Project Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Develops principles and management techniques needed to successfully complete projects. Utilizes technology to assist in initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling, and closing a project. Discusses the human costs of change and disruption associated with new projects.

    Prerequisite: IB 282  or BH 282 , IS 251  or BH 251 , MG 201  or BH 201 .
    Prerequisite (may be taken concurrently): OM 330  or BH 330 .
    Sessions Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer
  
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    OM 499 - Internship in Operations Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Individual study and group preparation and reflection while working for an organization. Students work with an operations or information systems professional, performing duties which are matched with Loyola coursework. Each internship is constructed by an operations management professor in conjunction with the on-site supervisor. Students work with the professor before engagement and at end of the term.

    Prerequisite: OM 330  or BH 330 .
    Restrictions: Restricted to seniors or written permission of the instructor.


Philosophy

  
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    PL 201 - Foundations of Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    The first half of a yearlong, two semester introduction to philosophical questioning. Special attention is paid to the origins of philosophy, both with respect to its historical beginnings and its central themes, in the ancient world. Four focal points are: the emergence and development of the distinction between reality and appearance (metaphysics); questions concerning the grounds for distinguishing between knowledge and opinion (epistemology); the nature and status of values (ethical, aesthetic, religious, etc.) within the larger framework of human understanding (axiology); and reflections on the nature of the human as such, or on the human condition (philosophical anthropology).

  
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    PL 202 - Philosophical Perspectives: The Project of Modernity

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines distinctive aspects of the modern philosophical project as it relates to questions of science, politics, society, history, or morals. Philosophical theories ranging from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries are treated in their historical development and/or their opposition to ancient teachings.

    Prerequisite: PL 201 .
  
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    PL 210 - Philosophical Perspectives: Politics and Society

    (3.00 cr.)

    Addresses the basis and goals of human society, including issues concerning the structure of the good community as balanced against the interests of the individual.

    Prerequisite: PL 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IPJ
  
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    PL 212 - Philosophical Perspectives: The Natural and the Human

    (3.00 cr.)

    The complex relationship between human existence and nature is explored. First, the course surveys the changing views of this relationship throughout history, then it focuses on the relationship with nature today. It asks what constitutes nature and how this relates to civilization and human creativity, how nature gives meaning to human existence, and questions the place and role of humans within the natural world. The consequences of living in an increasingly de-natured environment are explored.

    Prerequisite: PL 201 .
  
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    PL 214 - Philosophical Perspectives: The Utopian Imagination

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of utopian thinkers from the ancient world to the present. Central focus is on the concept of human nature and the meaning and possibility of the good life.

    Prerequisite: PL 201 .
  
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    PL 216 - Philosophical Perspectives: Asian Thought

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the philosophical and spiritual traditions of Asia, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. Comparisons with Western thought are explored.

    Prerequisite: PL 201 .
    Interdisciplinary Studies: IA
  
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    PL 218 - Philosophical Perspectives: Philosophies of Love

    (3.00 cr.)

    Considers various interpretations of the nature and destiny of love.

    Prerequisite: PL 201 .
  
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    PL 220 - Philosophical Perspectives: Art and Imagination

    (3.00 cr.)

    An exploration of the parallel development of philosophy and art as truth-disclosing activities.

    Prerequisite: PL 201 .
 

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