2023-2024 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Mar 03, 2024  
2023-2024 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue

School of Education


Office: College Center, Room W002
Telephone: 410‑617‑5095
Website: www.loyola.edu/soe

Dean: Afra Ahmed Hersi, Professor
Associate Dean: David Marcovitz, Professor

Chair, Teacher Education: Stacy A. Williams

Program Director, Teacher Education: Margarita Gómez
Secondary Minors Advisor: Stacy A. Williams
Special Education Minors Advisor: Jennifer Pettey
Urban Education Minors Advisor: Jessica Enos
Coordinator of Partnerships and Clinical Experiences: Stacy A. Williams

Professors: Victor R. Delclos (emeritus); Afra Ahmed Hersi; Joshua S. Smith; Wendy A. Smith (emerita)
Associate Professors: Margarita Gómez; Elana Rock (emerita); Camika Royal; Leah K. Saal
Assistant Professor: Karen Terrell
Clinical Professor: Stacy A. Williams
Assistant Clinical Professors: Kristina Collins; Amy Cosentino; Mark Covington; Jessica Enos; Melissa Gilroy; Melissa Mulieri; Jennifer Pettey; Monique Yates
Assistant Teaching Professors: Loretta Holmberg-Masden; Lauren McDougle
Affiliate Faculty: Carla Blackwell; Kaytee Lurz; Colleen Taghavi; Michele Murphy; Brandon Myers; Kerry Raup; Diana Parisi; Margaret Prentice; Sedrick Smith; Gena Stenger; Rashawna Sydnor; Christina Turner; Kaitlyn Weinberger; Alisha Ward; Hannah Watts

The Reverend Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, S.J., former Superior General of the Society of Jesus, has described the goal of Jesuit education with the following words: "We aim to form...men and women of competence, conscience, and compassionate commitment." In recognition of its connection to the Jesuit mission of the Loyola community, the School of Education has adopted the three words, Competence, Conscience, Compassion as the foundation for its conceptual framework.

Mission

Within the Jesuit traditions of intellectual excellence, social justice, ethical responsibility, and cura personalis, the School of Education—which encompasses the department of teacher education—promotes leadership and scholarship in the development of teachers, counselors, administrators, and other educators.

Accreditation

The School of Education has met all of the components of the Maryland Institutional Performance Criteria and is fully approved by the Maryland State Department of Education (200 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201) to offer undergraduate and graduate programs. This approval covers initial teacher preparation programs and advanced educator programs. However, the approval does not include individual education courses that the institution offers to P-12 educators for professional development, relicensure, or other purposes.

Learning Aims

  • The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.

  • The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.

  • The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self motivation.

  • The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines they teach and creates learning experiences that make the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.

  • The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

  • The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher's and learner's decision making.

  • The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.

  • The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.

  • The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate their practice, particularly the effects their choices and actions have on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.

  • The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

Education students must meet the knowledge, skills, and disposition standards as set forth by the School of Education's accrediting body. Students will be assessed by faculty at two transition points before internship to identify strengths, areas for improvement, and to recommend for continuation in the program. Students who fail to meet these standards in the area of dispositions will have a Professional Assessment Form filed with the department chair by a Loyola faculty member, followed by a Professional Assessment Review. The Professional Assessment Review may result in removal from the program and/or internship for the protection of both the Loyola student and the P-12 students. Complete details of this procedure are available in the student handbook.

Students in the School of Education are required to use a subscription to a web-based software application designated by the school. The platform is used for assessing, documenting, and analyzing student learning in coursework and in clinical experiences. Students' complete assignments, submit artifacts and reflections, and log time spent in the field. Evaluators provide feedback and assess student progress. The resulting ePortfolio becomes a digital record of the full scope of the student's development through the program.

Elementary Education Pathways

Elementary Education Major

Elementary education majors are prepared for teaching through a program which connects theory to practice. The clinically based program provides education majors experience working with diverse children in urban and suburban school settings. The program is approved by the Maryland State Department of Education (Elementary Education, grades 1-6). Appropriate licensure exams must be taken prior to graduation. Passing scores on the licensure exams are required in order to receive the approved program stamp and be eligible for certification. Students completing the certification track satisfy requirements for certification in the state of Maryland and are eligible for certification in the majority of states and U.S. territories through the interstate reciprocity agreement. For more details, please see NASDTEC's website.

Elementary Education/Special Education Dual Certification

Elementary education majors may pursue dual certification in elementary education and special education. Students must complete the requirements of both the elementary education major and the special education minor and a specialized clinical internship that includes placements in both general education and special education settings. For certification eligibility, students must pass the appropriate licensure exams for both areas.

Elementary Education Major, Non-Certification Pathway

During the spring of the senior year, elementary education majors who choose not to pursue or are not eligible for the certification track register for a 12-credit, non-certification option, consisting of one departmental elective and three free electives (chosen in conjunction with the advisor). The ED 446  requirement is waived for these students and replaced with one free elective. All other requirements for the major must be met. Students who complete this option do not complete the Maryland-approved program and cannot be recommended for certification.

Secondary Education Pathways

Secondary Minor

Secondary education minors are also prepared for teaching through a program which connects theory to practice. The clinically based program gives candidates experience working with diverse children in urban and suburban school settings. Candidates major in the area of certification and, upon completing the certification track, will be certified to teach grades 7-12 in biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, physics, or social studies or in grades PK-12 in art, French, Spanish, or music (instrumental or vocal). Appropriate licensure exams must be taken prior to graduation. Passing scores on the licensure exams are required in order to receive the approved program stamp and be eligible for certification. Students completing the certification track satisfy requirements for certification in the state of Maryland and are eligible for certification in the majority of states and U.S. territories through the interstate reciprocity agreement. For more details, please see NASDTEC's website.

Combined BA/BS-MAT

A combined BA/BS-MAT five-year program is a second pathway available for students who wish to pursue teacher certification. Applicants to secondary certification programs for grades 7-12 must have a major or significant coursework in one of the following certification areas: biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, physics, or social studies. Applicants to certification programs for grades PK-12 must have a major or significant coursework in one of the following certification areas: art, French, Spanish, or music. Students who are not elementary education majors but wish to pursue certification in grades 1 – 6 may have a major in any area but must meet the following pre-requisites: 9 credits in English/Language Arts, including a literature course; 9 credits in social studies, including U.S. history; 9 credits in mathematics, including statistics, and 10 credits in science, including a laboratory. Elementary education majors are not eligible for this program.

Students submit an application to the Office of Graduate Admission by March 15th of the junior year and take three graduate-level education courses in the senior year. Students completing the combined program satisfy requirements for certification in the state of Maryland and are eligible for certification in the majority of states and U.S. territories through the interstate reciprocity agreement. For more details, please see NASDTEC's website.

Application to the Teacher Certification Track

No later than September 15th of the junior year, elementary education majors and secondary education minors wishing to pursue teacher certification must apply and be accepted to the Teacher Certification Track. Secondary certification is offered in the following areas: Biology, Chemistry, English, French, Mathematics, Music (vocal or instrumental), Physics, Social Studies, Spanish, and Visual Arts. Secondary candidates must major in the certification area.

Students completing the Teacher Certification Track will complete an internship in a Professional Development School (PDS). The PDS is a collaborative effort between local schools and Loyola's School of Education.

Candidates must provide the following materials and meet deadlines listed below.

September 15 Deadline for candidates to submit application to School of Education
September 30 Candidates receive letter of admission status: full acceptance, probationary acceptance, or rejection
December Transition point assessments conducted
May 15 Undergraduate Program Director reviews candidate progress prior to internship acceptance

Application Materials

  • Unofficial Loyola transcript indicating successful completion (a grade of C or higher) of the education foundation courses listed below. Transfer students must submit official transcripts from all previous institutions for evaluation by the School of Education.
  • Transcript indicating a minimum GPA of 2.750. Candidates must maintain a 2.750 GPA to be eligible for Internship I and Internship II.
  • A 3.000 GPA or an official score report indicating passing scores for Praxis CORE Academic Skills for Educators or equivalent passing test score (see required scores below). Paper and electronic copies are accepted. NOTE: any candidate whose GPA drops below a 3.000 prior to graduation will be required to submit passing scores for the approved program stamp and certification eligibility.
  • Completed self-assessment of dispositions.
  • Completed self-disclosure statement of COMAR barrier crimes.

Minimum Required Test Scores by Exam Type (subject to change per MSDE regulations)

Praxis CORE Reading (Test #5721) - 156
Writing (Test #5722) - 162
Math (Test #5732) - 150
  or
ACT Composite score of 24
  or
SAT (2005-2016) Combined Math and Critical Reading - 1100
  or
SAT (2016 or later) Combined Evidence-Based Reading, Writing, and Math - 1180

Approved Program Completion

By May 1 of senior year, certification candidates are required to provide official scores to the School of Education for required licensure exams for May graduation. The testing requirements are listed on the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) website.

Non-Certification Minors

Special Education Minor

To enable education majors and other majors to respond to the needs of exceptional children, students seeking study in this area may choose to minor in special education.  Elementary education majors may pursue dual certification in elementary education and special education by completing the requirements of both the major and the minor with a specialized clinical internship that includes placements in both general education and special education settings. For certification eligibility, students must pass the appropriate licensure exams for both areas. Non-elementary education majors are able to complete the special education minor but will not be eligible for teacher certification.

Urban Education Minor

A minor in urban education provides students with an overview of the historical, social, political, economical, and cultural complexities of urban education in the United States. This program of study allows students to consider the unique challenges faced by students and educators in, and the communities surrounding, urban schools. While there is an emphasis on the social, political, and historical impacts on educational systems in large cities in the US, students also study issues that equip them to be social justice thinkers and practitioners in urban, suburban, and/or rural contexts, public or private schools, or beyond schools altogether. The minor in urban education consists of five courses, one required and four electives from a variety of disciplines across campus. Students must complete at least three of the five courses in the School of Education.

Programs

Accelerated

Major

Minor

Courses

Education

Literacy

Special Education