2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Oct 30, 2020  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Classics/Classical Civilization

  
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    CL 207 - Saint and Sinners in the Eternal City

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 Restricted to students studying in Rome. An exploration of the theological ideas found in autobiographies and biographies (including hagiographical accounts) of saints and sinners who have in some way left their mark on the Eternal City. Visits to important sites in and around Rome (including, but not limited to, churches) that relate to and/or illustrate these readings are included. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. (Summer only)
  
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    CL 211 - Classical Mythology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of the traditional stories of the Greeks and Romans as expressed in their literature and art with an emphasis on the literature's background, value, and influence. Usually offered fall semester. Art elective for elementary education majors. Same course as EN 211 . II
  
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    CL 212 - The Classical Epics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of the epic poetry of Homer and Virgil in translation, with an emphasis on the poetry's background, value, and influence. The course may include a short survey of other epics. Same course as EN 212 .
  
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    CL 213 - Greek Drama

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of selected plays in English translation by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and others, with an emphasis on the literature's background, value, and influence. Specific readings vary with the instructor. Same course as EN 213 .
  
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    CL 214 - The Ancient Novel

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of the ancient novel in English translation, with particular emphasis on Apuleius and Petronius-master stylists and literary innovators who chronicled life in the Roman Empire at its most diverse, complex, and decadent. Same course as EN 214 .
  
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    CL 218 - The Golden Age of Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: EN 101 . A study of selected works in translation by some of Rome's greatest writers, with special emphasis on Vergil, Ovid, and Livy. The course may be organized chronologically or thematically. Specific readings vary with the instructor. May be offered in Rome. Same course as EN 218 . II
  
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    CL 220 - The Ancient World

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the development of Western thought in the ancient world.
  
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    CL 224 - The Gospels and the Earliest Churches

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Explores what we can discover about Jesus and the earliest Christian communities from the texts of the Gospels and other early Christian literature. Constantly examines how such knowledge is relevant to Christian life today. Same course as TH 224 . IC
  
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    CL 225 - Biographical Tales of the Bible

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Explores stories of various individuals from the Old and New Testaments (Abraham, Joseph, Moses, David, Ruth, Esther, Jesus, etc.); analyses structure, rhetorical features, and theological perspectives of the narratives; and inquires how the portrayal of these characters illuminate the shape of God's initiative in human history and the varieties of response. Same course as TH 225 . IC
  
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    CL 226 - Women in the Christian Tradition

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Examines the contribution of women to the Christian tradition, as well as questions addressed by their presence through the use of primary texts and monographs. Writings include Augustine's letters to women and such topics as the role of widows in the early church and medieval reformers and abbesses. The modern era includes women evangelicals, questions raised by some contemporary feminists, and women and religion in America. Same course as TH 211 . IC/IG
  
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    CL 229 - Images of God in Scripture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God, and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self understanding in relation to God. Same course as TH 229 .
  
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    CL 231 - Story and Revelation: The Art of Biblical Narrative

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Examines the ways in which the Old and New Testaments use storytelling as a medium for revelation. We will look both at the literary features of particular biblical narratives and the theological perspectives presented in those stories. Same course as TH 231 .
  
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    CL 241 - Survey of Art: Paleolithic to Gothic

    (3.00 cr.)

    A broad overview of art from the Paleolithic age to the Gothic era, focusing on Egyptian, Greek and Roman, early Christian and medieval art and architecture. Fulfills fine arts core requirement. Same course as AH 110 .
  
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    CL 246 - Who is Jesus?

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Explores the identity of Jesus Christ, as expressed in Scripture, the doctrine and tradition of the Church, as well as in art and literature. Emphasizes the historical context of Jesus' life, the variety of ways in which the significance of that life has been articulated over the centuries, and the ways in which one might discern faithful from unfaithful articulations. Same course as TH 246 . IC
  
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    CL 250 - Clash of the Titans: Ancient versus Modern Worlds

    (3.00 cr.)

    The classical tradition and the modern perception of the ancients; exploration of the legacy of the Greeks and Romans in selected areas; discussion of the reception and interpretation of antiquity by the modern world. Topics include the myth and character of Odysseus, ancient and modern comedy, the Roman and American constitutions and politics, the ancient and modern Olympics, democracy and relativism, architecture, the ancient world in contemporary film, and concepts of justice.
  
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    CL 270 - Greece and Rome on Film

    (3.00 cr.)

    Sex, violence, insanity, and monsters are the main ingredients in Hollywood's recipe for movies about ancient Greece and Rome. By watching films like Gladiator, 300, Troy, Ben-Hur, and others, students discover the truth behind the extravagant images and see some very good (and very bad) films along the way. IF
  
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    CL 291 - The Gladiator

    (3.00 cr.)

    A first-year Messina seminar that uses ancient and modern texts (e.g., The Colosseum, The Roman Games: A Sourcebook) and films (e.g., Gladiator, Spartacus, The Hunger Games) to illuminate the intersection of cruelty, ideology, and entertainment in the ancient arena. (Spring only)
  
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    CL 292 - Race, Conquest, and Identity in Ancient North Africa

    (3.00 cr.)

    A first-year Messina seminar that examines questions of race, imperialism, and cultural/ethnic identity in ancient North Africa, both before and after the Roman conquest. Students are exposed to global diversity and issues of justice, especially with reference to conquered populations, and to questions of assimilation and resistance.
  
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    CL 300 - Death of the Roman Republic

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS100-level course. A study of the final century of the Roman Republic when Rome suffered under the struggles for personal power of men like Sulla, Mark Antony, and Julius Caesar. Focuses on primary sources with a particular emphasis on the writings of Cicero who documented the final years of the Republic in public speeches as well as private, biting personal letters. Same course as HS 300 . II
  
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    CL 301 - The Church and the Roman Empire

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. A tiny, new religion and a vast, old empire collide. An examination of the early Church in the context of the Roman Empire. Topics include women in pagan and Christian societies; places and forms of worship; reasons for and pace of the Church's expansion; orthodoxy and heterodoxy in the early Church; myths concerning the persecutions; the Christians' debt to pagan ways of thinking and doing; the earliest Christian art; class and race as factors in the Christianization of the empire; the organization of the early Church; the Church's response to the sexual mores of its pagan neighbors; origins of the Christians' reputation for bizarre sexual promiscuity and human sacrifice; Constantine. May be offered in Rome. Same course as HS 301 . IC/II/IM
  
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    CL 302 - City of Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the city of Rome, with particular emphasis on ancient Rome and its legacy for the city throughout history. Students examine the state of the city today and read texts describing its physical, architectural, artistic, and cultural evolution through time. Offered in Rome only. II
  
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    CL 307 - Peace and War in Ancient Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. Restricted to students studying in Rome. A survey of ideas about peace and war in the ancient city with visits to some of the most important archaeological sites in Rome.  Sites to visit include various monuments commemorating Roman military achievements, like the Column of Trajan, and the museums of Rome to see art that depicted virtuous captives and victorious soldiers, as well as dedications to abstractions like clemency, courage, and family devotion.  Students learn about Roman attitudes towards victory and  defeat.  The course includes in-person viewing and reading of primary sources. Offered in Rome only. Same course as HS 307 . GT/IPJ (Summer only)
  
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    CL 308 - Art of Ancient Greece

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of Greek art and architecture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Era. Among the topics considered are Mycenaean tombs and palaces, the development of temple architecture, and the ways in which polytheistic religion shaped life in ancient Greece. Same course as AH 308 .
  
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    CL 309 - Art of Ancient Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of Roman art and architecture from the emergence of the Etruscan Civilization to the fall of the empire. Topics include the forging of a new Roman culture from Italic and Greek origins, the invention of new construction techniques, and the appropriation of art for propagandistic purposes. One section of the course is offered in Rome. Same course as AH 309 . II
  
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    CL 312 - History of Ancient Greece

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS100-level course. A study of Greece from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great, with special attention to the development of the Greek polis or city-state and to the various constitutional, social, economic, and religious forms which this took. Same course as HS 312 .
  
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    CL 313 - History of Christmas

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS100-level course. Is Christmas the commemoration of Jesus' birth? Or is it a pagan winter festival hiding behind a thin but deceptive veil of Christian images and ideas? Students will discover that the holiday is both of these things and a good deal more to boot. Students examine the origins and many transformations of the holiday and how the holiday has both reflected and helped determine the course of history. Topics include the Christmas tree, gift giving, the suppression of Christmas, the Nativity accounts, pagan precedents and, of course, Santa. Same course as HS 313 . IC
  
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    CL 314 - History of the Roman Empire

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. A survey of imperial history from the Principate of Augustus to the Reign of Constantine; focuses on the development of Roman culture as seen through the surviving ancient sources, including historians, inscriptions, monuments, and coins. May be offered in Rome. Same course as HS 314 . II/IM
  
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    CL 320 - Hellenistic History

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS100-level course. A study of the Greek world from the death of Socrates (399 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (146 B.C.). Covers the fourth-century struggle for supremacy over Greece, Alexander the Great, the waning of the city-state and the growth of federal government and monarchy, and the nature of and reasons for the Roman conquest of Greece. Emphasizes the cultural, social, artistic, and intellectual developments of the period: the status of women, Hellenistic philosophy and technology, the class struggle, the evolution of Greek art and literature, athletics, private life, Greek religion, and ancient warfare. Same course as HS 320 .
  
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    CL 322 - Gladiators and Roman Spectacles

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of ancient Rome's spectacles, including gladiatorial combat, chariot racing, animal fights and exhibitions, and mock battles. The course explores the intersection of power, violence, entertainment, class, and sex in Roman spectacles. Same course as HS 322 .
  
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    CL 324 - Seminar: The Persecution of the Christians in the Roman World

    (3.00 cr.)

    An exploration of the causes, nature, and extent of early Christian persecutions until Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire in the fourth century. Topics include the Jewish-Greek- Roman environment of early Christianity; Rome's policies toward foreign cults; Christians' reputation for extreme promiscuity and cultic atrocities; comparison with competing cults; the danger of open profession of the new faith; and Christian acceptance of the ancient world. Given the muddled understanding of the early Christian persecutions, the course examines and dispels the myths and brings some order to the chaos. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Same course as HS 475 . IC/IM
  
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    CL 326 - The Golden Age of Athens

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. An examination of what has been called Athens' golden age focusing on the political and cultural factors which made the fifth century unique. Subjects include creation and workings of Athenian democracy, victories of the Persian wars, the Greek Enlightenment, Pericles' rule of the best citizen, demagoguery and empire, the Peloponnesian War, and the "end" of Athens symbolized by the execution of Socrates. Same course as HS 326 .
  
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    CL 327 - Volcanoes, Fire, and Flood: Disasters of Ancient Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. An examination of ancient Rome's greatest disasters: the destruction of Pompeii, the Great Fire of Rome, floods, and plagues. Students investigate the causes of these events; the Romans' efforts to navigate and make sense of them; and the transformations they brought to the ancients' environment, behavior, and thought. Same course as HS 327 . IFS
  
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    CL 328 - Soldiers, Land, and Population Transferrals

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. Focuses on three topics regarding the Roman army: (a) the army as a social institution; (b) the problem of land ownership and distribution; and (c) the use of population transferrals as an instrument for social engineering. Students explore these topics in order to gain new insight into the accomplishments and failures of individuals as diverse as Pompeius Magnus, Augustus, and Theodosius I. Since history is never without relevance to the present, this seminar also provides students with new ideas and instruments for dealing with contemporary debates about such disputed issues as family farms and immigration. May be offered in Rome. Same course as HS 328 .
  
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    CL 329 - Women in Greece and Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS100-level course. An examination of the lives of and attitudes toward women in ancient Greece and Rome. Classic texts of ancient literature are read, masterpieces of art are viewed, and the sociology of ancient women is probed. Topics include the family; prostitution; women of the imperial family; Cleopatra; health, child bearing, and birth control; the source and psychology of Greek misogyny; jet-setters and women's liberation under the early Roman Empire; women and work; women in myth; women in early Christianity; the legacy of classical civilization for modern women. Same course as HS 329 . IG
  
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    CL 334 - Roman Private Life

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS100-level course. A study of family and social life in Ancient Rome which focuses on how environment and custom determine one another. Topics include women, crime, racism, pollution, class structure, private religion and magic, Christianity, blood sports, medicine, travel, theater, and death. Same course as HS 334 . II
  
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    CL 335 - An Introduction to the Theology of Saint Augustine

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Studies the life and writings of the great fifth-century bishop and theologian, Augustine of Hippo. Topics include grace, free will, scripture, and the role of civil authority. Same course as TH 335 . IC/IM
  
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    CL 337 - The Multicultural Roman Empire

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS100-level course. In conquering and attempting to unify lands as diverse as Egypt, Iran, Britain, and Algeria, the Romans undertook one of the greatest social and political experiments in the history of the world. They assimilated some of the peoples they conquered, but the vanquished, in turn, assimilated their Roman conquerors-it is no accident that one third century emperor was named Philip the Arab. This course examines the strategies by which the Romans attempted to hold together their vast, multicultural empire, and the strategies by which many of their subjects preserved and even promulgated their cultures. Be prepared for clash and compromise, oppression and respect, culture and race, and, of course, some very astonishing customs. Same course as HS 337 . II
  
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    CL 339 - The Fall of Two Empires: Rome and Byzantium

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. The Roman and Byzantine Empires each lasted a thousand years, yet both fell. How? This course examines the reasons, internal and external, that brought an end to both empires; how they declined; and how they finally dissolved. It investigates how the political instability brought about by increasingly weak absolutist governments; the inabilities of their armies and navies to adapt to changes brought about by technological innovations and economic restraints; and the invasions of powerful outside cultural, religious, and military forces played roles in destroying two of the greatest States in history.
  
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    CL 340 - Biblical Hebrew I

    (3.00 cr.)

    An enriched beginning course emphasizing grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Intended for students with no previous knowledge of the language.  

    TH 340 .

     

     

  
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    CL 341 - Hollywood in Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    Murder, mayhem, lunatics, and orgies-so Hollywood has tended to depict the Greco-Roman wellspring of Western Civilization. Students discover the truth behind the extravagant images and see some moving, ridiculous, spectacular, and brilliant films along the way. IF
  
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    CL 346 - Disputing the Bible

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Examines a selection of arguments from the first through the twentieth centuries about how to interpret the Bible. Same course as TH 346 . IC
  
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    CL 347 - Jesus and the Gospels

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Students examine a variety of issues surrounding the portrayal of Jesus in the Gospels of the New Testament and in other early Christian writings. Same course as TH 347 . IC
  
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    CL 350 - Introduction to European Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the history, art, literature, and culture of Europe. II
  
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    CL 355 - Saint Paul and His Writings

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Explores the writings and theology of Paul the apostle. Topics include selected readings from Paul's writings, study of Paul's life and times, and an engagement with secondary literature. Same course as TH 355 . IC
  
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    CL 356 - Genesis: Exploring the Bible's First Book

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Genesis: the first and most famous book of the Bible, containing its earthiest and its most famous stories. Sex, sibling rivalry, love and heartbreak, folklore, and folk magic-it is all there, even Joseph and his "amazing technicolor dreamcoat." The course takes students through Genesis slowly and carefully, along with history's memorable interpretations. Same course as TH 356 . IC
  
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    CL 358 - Ancient Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL200-level course. From the early inquiries of the Milesians to the elaborately structured reflections of Aristotle, the ancient Greek philosophers inaugurated questions about knowledge, virtue, being, and human nature that we continue to ask today. The course focuses on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical topics in Thales, Pythagoras, Parmenides, Heraclitus, the Atomists, the Sophists, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Same course as PL 358 .
  
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    CL 359 - The Presocratics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL200-level course. An investigation of the writings of the pre-Socratic philosophers, from Thales to the Sophists. The course looks at their work both in terms of its own intrinsic interest and its influence on later philosophers, chiefly Plato and Aristotle. Same course as PL 359 .
  
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    CL 360 - Independent Study: Classical Civilization

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS 100-level course. An independent study in classical civilization. Topics vary. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.
  
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    CL 362 - Special Topics in Classics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students focus on a specific author, genre, or topic in Classics. May be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.
  
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    CL 364 - God and Radical Evils

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: TH 201 . Addresses the general question, "How does God deal with evil?" and primarily the more specific question, "How does the triune God of Jesus Christ deal with radical (non-trivial) evils?" The diverse and conflicting responses to such difficult questions bear, directly and indirectly, on how Christians and others should deal with radical evils in their lives and those of their neighbors. Students read responses in the Biblical and Christian tradition, as well as contemporary literary, philosophical, and theological responses. Students develop their own responses in conversation with these readings. Same course as TH 364 .
  
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    CL 366 - Studies in Plato

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL200-level course. An inquiry into the epistemological, moral, and metaphysical writings of Plato's middle and later periods, with special reference to the relation of anamnesis, participation and the theory of forms in the middle dialogues to koinonia and the theory of the greatest kinds in the later dialogues. Same course as PL 366 .
  
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    CL 367 - Plato's Republic

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL200-level course. An examination of the teachings contained in one of the most important of the Platonic dialogues. A close study of the dialogue and lectures treats the nature of justice, the quarrel between poetry and philosophy, relationship between philosophy and politics or theology, the character of the philosopher, the purposes of education, the doctrine of "ideas," and the naturality of political life. Same course as PL 367 .
  
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    CL 368 - Introduction to Aristotle

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL200-level course. A study of Aristotle as a systematic thinker with an integrated view of the natural world, the goals of human life, and the formal properties of thought. Primary focus on selections from Aristotle's logical works and psychological treatises, together with his Physics, Metaphysics, Ethics, and Politics. Same course as PL 368 .
  
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    CL 380 - Platonic Political Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Socrates and the founding of political philosophy; Thucydides and the crisis of the polis; the critique of Aristophanes; Plato's Apology, Crito, Gorgias, Republis, Theaetetus; subsequent contributions to the tradition by Cicero, Saint Augustine, Alfarabi, and Saint Thomas More; Plato's modern enemies: Machiavelli and Mill. Same course as PS 380 .
  
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    CL 381 - Aristotelian Political Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    An investigation of the founding of political science by Aristotle devoted to a reading of Nicomachean Ethics and Politics, as well as selections from Aristotle's scientific and logical treatises. Subsequent contributions to the tradition are also considered, including those of Marsilius of Padua and Saint Thomas Aquinas. Aristotle's modern enemies: Hobbes and Marx. Same course as PS 381 .
  
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    CL 388 - Socratic Political Philosophy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Socrates, the first political philosopher, wrote nothing. His unique life and thought are known only through the writings of others-both friends and enemies. By reading works by Aristophanes, Plato, Xenophon, and Nietzsche, students seek to understand the Socratic way of life. The famous "Socratic turn" is examined-Socrates' move from natural philosophy toward political philosophy and the study of "the human things." Students also examine Socrates' quarrel with poets, the Sophists, and the political community itself. Was the Athenian democracy right to put Socrates to death? Finally, Socrates' relations with his friends and students are examined-how and what did he teach them. Same course as PS 388 .
  
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    CL 405 - Aristotelian Ethics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PL 201  and one additional PL200-level course. An examination of the ethical writings of Aristotle, with an emphasis on the Nicomachean Ethics. It then explores contemporary Aristotelian ethics in its religious (Alasdair MacIntyre) and secular (Martha Nussbaum) variants. Same course as PL 405 .
  
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    CL 420 - Homer and History

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS100-level course, one HS300-level course. Was there a Trojan War? What is the relation of Homer's epic Iliad to historical events of the Bronze Age Aegean? What was its impact on the Greek world of the Geometric era (the most likely period for the composition of the Homeric poems), a lively period of expansion, colonization, trade, and the rise of the nation-state of the polis. Investigates Homer's effect both on contemporary Greek national identity and later Greeks' understanding of and deliberate construction of their own past. Interdisciplinary approach combining literary texts, archaeology, and secondary historical analysis. Same course as HS 420 .
  
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    CL 421 - Caesar and Augustus

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: One HS100-level course. They transformed a great republic into a monarchy; killed (literally) millions of people; conquered a huge chunk of the Mediterranean World and Europe; carried out one of the greatest urban renewal projects in history; revived and transformed religion; revised the calendar; inspired Shakespeare, Shaw, and dozens of movies. And yet, the one wound up assassinated by his peers, and the other had so little control over his own family that he felt compelled to exile his jet-set daughter to the Roman equivalent of Siberia. Who were they? And how did the epochal events of their lifetime give birth to such genius monsters? Same course as HS 421 . II
  
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    CL 450 - Senior Honors Thesis

    (3-6.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: Senior standing. An optional program available to select classics or classical civilization majors in their senior year. A directed, intensive study of an author, topic, or theme from classical literature, history, or art and archaeology culminating in a written thesis and oral defense. Students are expected to confront scholarship and to do research at an advanced level. Students using this course as a substitute for two advanced language courses are expected to produce a very involved, two-semester honors thesis. By invitation only. May be repeated once for credit.

Communication

  
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    CM 203 - Introduction to Communication

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the history, theory, practices, institutions, and impact of modern communications media in the United States, including audience experience of media, the media's impact on society, producing and consuming media, and media industries and careers. Includes readings in primary texts of the field. Serves as the foundation for the study of communication. Required for all communication majors and minors.
  
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    CM 204 - Introduction to Multimedia

    (3.00 cr.)

    Drawn from the Western tradition in the arts and philosophy, applied media aesthetics is used to examine how all mass media (including publications, radio, sound recordings, television, motion pictures, video games, and computer applications) communicate sense and meaning. Learning activities include spoken and written analysis and interpretation of sample works. IF
  
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    CM 205 - Introduction to Journalism

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the American news media including newspapers, magazines, broadcast, and online news. Topics include the history and development of the news media and news media institutions; the political, economic, social, and cultural impact of journalism; the rights, responsibilities, and changing roles of journalists; and examples of classic reporting. This course provides a conceptual foundation for learning about contemporary journalistic practice. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 226 - Introduction to Advertising

    (3.00 cr.)

    This course is designed to foster a critical understanding of advertising as an institution and its role in American culture and society. Students develop a framework within which to understand the continuing dialogue between supporters and critics and confront issues related to the institution's ethical conduct, regulatory issues, and social responsibility. The course serves as an introduction to the field of advertising in which students learn how to connect the institution of advertising to its social, political, economic, and cultural impact on society. Students develop the ability to critically assess the role of advertising, and an awareness of ongoing legal and ethical issues that confront the advertising industry.
  
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    CM 227 - Introduction to Public Relations

    (3.00 cr.)

    The role of public relations in society has never been greater. Private and public organizations depend on good relationships with groups and individuals whose opinions, decisions, and actions shape the world in which we live. The course provides a comprehensive overview of the practice of public relations including the history and development of the field; a survey of the use of public relations in business, government, crisis management, and other areas; and an introduction to many of the pragmatic skills needed by public relations practitioners.
  
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    CM 301 - News Reporting and Writing

    (3.00 cr.)

    A lab course devoted to learning the basics of news reporting and writing for print and online publication. The emphasis is on learning to report and to write the basic news story types that most entry-level journalists are expected to have mastered. Students learn the best practices associated with professional journalism, including objectivity, fairness, balance, and verification, as well as interviewing techniques and story research. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 302 - Free Speech, Free Expression

    (3.00 cr.)

    Through close examination of major U.S. Supreme Court decisions, students explore the contours of free speech and free expression in America. The relationship of free speech to democracy; the need for and possible restrictions on robust debate; and the First Amendment protections for commercial speech are discussed. IU (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 303 - Media Ethics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Features a comprehensive examination of the ethical issues and ideas informing today's communications media. Students examine real world, personal and workplace ethics, and case studies specific to advertising, public relations, journalism, and online and digital media. Does not fulfill the ethics core requirement.
  
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    CM 305 - Media and the Political Process

    (3.00 cr.)

    An in-depth look at the relationship of all forms of media (including journalism, advertising, and public relations) to the political system in the United States. Readings drawn from both the scholarly and popular literature in the field. IU
  
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    CM 306 - Popular Culture in America

    (3.00 cr.)

    An upper-level introduction to the issues surrounding popular culture and approaches to studying contemporary popular culture. Students explore the ways in which consumers experience the popular arts and entertainment and the significance of popular culture as both a reflection of, and an influence upon, American attitudes, beliefs, expectations, hopes, and concerns. The course is taught as a colloquium in which various topics are introduced by the instructor and explored in class discussion. Emphasis is placed on primary source artifacts of contemporary American popular arts and techniques for analyzing their social and cultural implications. Other dimensions such as historical and cross-cultural comparisons, discussion of the industries that develop and distribute commercial entertainment and information, and various critical and evaluative theories are included. The goal of the course is to refine the students' abilities to read, evaluate, and synthesize materials from popular culture into their own interdisciplinary analysis. IU
  
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    CM 310 - Public Speaking

    (3.00 cr.)

    Informed by classical rhetoric, students become skilled in the Jesuit tradition of eloquentia perfecta: clear thought delivered eloquently. Students research topics, write basic informative and persuasive speeches, practice speaking individually and in teams, and give and receive supportive critiques. This course helps students to build skills and confidence for oral presentations in other classes and the wider world. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 311 - Story Development and Scripting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore brainstorming and other strategies for story development, basic story structure, character development, and the natural arc of storytelling as it applies to dramatic, comedic, and nonfiction audio and video productions. Students analyze these structures in professional prototypes and put them into practice in developing their own script projects for audio, video, and the Web. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 312 - Web I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Offers students the conceptual understandings—such as design principles, Web usability, and search engine optimization—associated with website design and development. Students also learn essential skills with applications such as HTML, CSS, Contentment Management systems and other related programs needed to build effective websites. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 314 - Communication Research

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn to analyze and understand the broad range of methods used to systematically evaluate communication processes in advertising, public relations, journalism, and popular culture. Students learn how to design and select methods to conduct in-depth studies in all forms of mass communication and to analyze and understand research data and results. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 316 - Travel Reporting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to students studying abroad. Students explore contemporary forms of travel reporting, developing their own travel stories as well as critiquing those of others.
  
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    CM 322 - Graphics I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn basic concepts of file formats, bitmap picture editing, vector drawing, and page layout while developing skills in industry-standard computer graphics software tools. For visual journalists, designers, and media producers.
  
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    CM 324 - Video I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn digital moviemaking, camera handling, lighting, editing, motion tilting, basic animation, and studio techniques for broadcast television, DVD, Internet streaming, and podcasts. IF
  
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    CM 330 - Stereotypes in U.S. Film and Television

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students use critical-cultural approaches to examine how narrative and documentary films, television shows, and music videos have constructed racial, gendered, and class images of U.S. society. They also examine how these images intersect, inform, and influence our perceptions, biases, and behaviors. Students view, discuss, write, and reflect on these issues as they consider appropriate responses to these social constructions, including ways in which the camera can be used to redefine social images and spaces to enhance respect for diversity. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 340 - Advanced Reporting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 205 , CM 301 . Students practice reporting and writing more complex story types and learn how to report on society's primary institutions and major social issues. Public affairs emphasis includes government, elections, budgets, criminal justice system, environment, labor and major issues facing urban and suburban communities. (Spring only)
  
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    CM 342 - Media, Culture, and Society

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore the impact of media on culture and social structure through the close examination of cultural products including books, television shows, music, and advertising. Using a wide range of theoretical constructions, students learn to analyze the social meanings of cultural objects. IU (Fall/Summer)
  
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    CM 345 - Global Advertising

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on global marketers, global media companies, and transnational advertising agencies that impact global culture. Students engage in critical study of the variety of distinctive cultural factors that impact global advertising regarding class, racial, and gender divisions within a country. (Spring only)
  
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    CM 346 - International Public Relations

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 227 . A study of how public relations can be used in and adapted to different countries in the globalized economy by multinational corporations, nongovernmental organizations, militaries, governments, and/or activist groups. Students learn how identity and power are negotiated across multiple cultural contexts to communicate about organizations, ideas, products, and services. Students are invited to explore their special interests in accordance with class/professor guidelines.
  
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    CM 347 - The Documentary Tradition

    (3.00 cr.)

    A close study of the documentary tradition-including ethnography, propaganda, cinema verité, and postmodernism-that testifies to the tremendous vitality of the form, assesses its current state, and projects the future. Screenings celebrate human dignity and diversity in its many variations of race, gender, ethnicity, national origin, culture, religion, and sexual orientation. Students view, discuss, and write about majors works and apply insights to their own documentary projects. IF
  
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    CM 349 - Book Arts and Artists' Books

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: SA 224  or written permission of the instructor. Students are introduced to the materials, techniques, concepts, and equipment used in the craft of making traditional and nontraditional books. They learn folding, stitching, enclosing, and binding methods while creating three-dimensional works that literally or metaphorically reference the structure of books and address contemporary ideas about visual content. Same course as PT 353 /SA 353 . ART
  
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    CM 350 - Advertising Copy Writing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 226 . Students participate in a copywriting workshop aimed at providing practice in writing print advertisements (magazine, newspaper, billboards), radio and television commercials, storyboards, direct mail, and other types of material. Consideration given to how the copywriter interacts with the creative team and the development of a complete campaign.
  
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    CM 351 - Introduction to Radio and Digital Audio

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the contemporary radio industry, digital platforms, and basic audio production. The course explores fundamental concepts of production theory, aesthetics, and techniques. Students produce proficient and creative audio projects suitable for radio broadcast and multimedia platforms. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 352 - Graphics II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 322 . Students learn the basics of publication design, layout, and production while using industry-standard computer software tools to create, choose, and manipulate formats, grids, layouts, logo/ nameplates, and typography. The overall goal is to relate effective design to clear and meaningful communication. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 353 - Video II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 324 . An advanced class that focuses on video story telling. Students develop their own movie concepts, write full scripts, recruit and rehearse actors, and shoot and edit the videos for public presentation. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 354 - Writing for Public Relations

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 227 . An introduction to the wide range of communications materials developed by public relations professionals. Students learn how to write press releases, speeches, corporate background material, position papers, and internal publications such as newsletters. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 355 - Advertising Management

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 226 . Students explore the challenges of account management, account planning, and media planning/buying-functions that are crucial in the advertising industry. The course focuses on developing advertising plans and budgets, conceiving media plans and advertising strategies, and executing media buys.
  
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    CM 356 - Case Studies in Public Relations

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 227 . An in-depth approach to the practical aspects of public relations management. Using real-life examples from the corporate, government, education, and nonprofit sectors, students discover how and why public relations practitioners make decisions and apply their techniques. The psychological, ethical, and legal aspects of public relations communications are covered.
  
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    CM 357 - Seminar in Public Relations Specialties

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 227 . In-depth investigation of several public relations (PR) specialties, depending on student interest. Possible topics include event planning, entertainment PR, sports PR, fund-raising, community relations, nonprofit PR, crisis communication, investor relations, and healthcare. Students are invited to explore their special interests in PR practice in accordance with class/professor guidelines.
  
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    CM 358 - Social Media in Advertising and Public Relations

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 226  or CM 227 . A study of social media use (e.g., Facebook, Twitter) for advertising and public relations functions, including promotion of products and services, image formation and management, and community relations. Students learn industry "best practices" for utilizing social media-such as consumer tracking/measurement and search engine optimization (SEO)-and plan a social media campaign. Use of classroom technology is required.
  
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    CM 359 - Advertising Culture and Identity

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 226  or written permission of the instructor. Students examine the role of the audience's identity in the advertising process. Students learn about the potential for advertising messages to shape and reflect the identity of viewers; the role of viewer identity in determining advertising outcomes; and the effectiveness of how commercial messages are influenced by the personal and social identities of consumers.
  
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    CM 360 - Literary Journalism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 205 , CM 301 . A study of journalism as art. The course examines the techniques and methods of reporting and writing literary journalism by close study of prominent examples-books, essays, and articles. IU (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 361 - Copy Editing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students become familiar with the newspaper process: copy editing, specifying type, writing headlines, and proofreading. Students work with wire service copy and other raw copy, editing, rewriting, and copy fitting. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    CM 362 - Arts and Entertainment Journalism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 205 , CM 301 . Analyzes media coverage of arts and culture—fashion, food, TV, film, music, and technology. Students learn skills to develop and craft specialized content—articles, blogs, and criticism—using multimedia elements across multiple platforms.
  
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    CM 364 - Contemporary Digital Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: CM 322  or SA 224  or written permission of the instructor. Students gain an understanding of contemporary artists who use a combination of digital and traditional tools to create artworks, while also developing their own art practice. Video, animation, sound, web-based artwork, interactivity, and other media practices are addressed. Same course as PT 364 /SA 364 .
  
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    CM 365 - Podcasting and Long-Form Digital Audio

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students learn the theories and techniques of creative audio storytelling to produce long-form features and podcasts. Skills in pitching stories, research, field recording, interviewing, scripting, multitrack production and editing are developed to professional standards within the context of contemporary radio broadcasting and digital media platforms.
  
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    CM 366 - Reporting on Urban Affairs

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students study examples of outstanding writing on urban affairs in newspapers, magazines, and books. Students then report and write about such key urban issues as development, education, poverty, growth, transportation, housing, employment, quality of life, etc. Special emphasis on cultural diversity. Formats include news, feature, and opinion writing.
 

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