2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue 
    
    Jan 22, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
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    AC 201 - Financial Accounting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Focuses on introducing financial accounting which provides information for decision makers outside the entity primarily by means of general-purpose financial statements. Students acquire a basic knowledge of the language of business. Topics include the application of accounting theory and generally accepted accounting principles to business transactions encountered by corporations during the accounting cycle.
  
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    AC 202 - Managerial Accounting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 201  or BH 200 . Introduces managerial accounting for internal decision makers. Students learn how to prepare and use financial information primarily for internal decision-making purposes. Topics include accounting for manufacturing; job order cost systems; incremental analysis, standard costs, budgeting, and statement of cash flows.
  
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    AC 301 - Intermediate Accounting I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 201 , EC 102 , EC 103 . Corequisite: AC 310  (Required only for in-class delivery in the fall). Recommended Prerequisite: EC 220 . Focuses on the development of financial information for investors and others external to the organization. Topics include review of the accounting cycle; cash, receivables, inventories, operational assets, and preparation of financial statements. Students learn to prepare, understand, and interpret financial statements. Pronouncements of the AICPA, FASB, and SEC are an integral part of the course. (Fall/Summer)
  
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    AC 302 - Intermediate Accounting II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 301 . Corequisite: AC 310  (required only for in-class delivery in the spring). Students learn to develop and analyze the information reported in financial statements. Topics include operational assets, intangible assets, short-term and long-term investments, short-term and long-term liabilities, leases, and financial analysis. Pronouncements of the AICPA, FASB, and SEC are an integral part of the course. (Spring/Summer)
  
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    AC 303 - Intermediate Accounting III

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 302 . Corequisite: AC 310 . Students learn to develop and analyze information reported in financial statements. Topics include stockholder's equity, dilutive securities and earnings per share, pensions, income taxes, statement of cash flows, accounting changes, and financial analysis. Pronouncements of the AICPA, FASB, and SEC are an integral part of the course. (Fall only)
  
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    AC 310 - Accounting Lab

    (0.00 cr.)

    Additional problem solving sessions, examinations, and guest speakers. For students taking AC 301 AC 302 , AC 303 , and AC 311  (excluding Loyola study abroad students). May be repeated. (Pass/Fail) (Fall/Spring)
  
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    AC 311 - Cost Accounting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 202 , EC 102 , EC 103 .  Corequisite: AC 310 . Recommended Prerequisite: EC 220  .  Deals with cost measurement, recording, and forecasting. In-depth coverage of cost-volume-profit analysis, costing systems, budgeting, manufacturing-costing systems, relevant costs, and decision making. Emphasizes the use of computers as tools for managers. Students learn to identify, classify, and apply cost accounting techniques in business applications. (Fall only)
  
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    AC 320 - International Accounting: Study Tour

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: FI 320  or BH 320  may be taken concurrently. Restricted to junior or senior accounting or business administration majors with cumulative GPA of 2.500 or higher. In a global market place, the need for a deep understanding of how to manage and account for transactions in various currencies and to protect against the fluctuations in the exchange rate is real for any sizable firm. This course provides an opportunity for students to gain a better understanding of topics such as the foreign exchange market, risk management and foreign currency hedging, financial accounting for derivatives instruments, and foreign currencies transactions and translation accounting. A 10-day study tour to China with site visits to global companies in Beijing and Shanghai is included. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. (Spring only)
  
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    AC 401 - Advanced Accounting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 302 . Focuses on specialized financial accounting topics related to business combinations and consolidated financial statements; partnership accounting; financial reporting by multinational corporations, including foreign currency translation and transactions; governmental accounting; nonprofit entities. Students develop a thorough understanding of these topics. (Spring only)
  
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    AC 402 - Accounting Information Systems

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 301 . Examines the role of accounting systems in the flow of information and assets. Students learn to recognize the strengths and weaknesses of accounting information systems from both an internal control and an efficiency perspective. Topics include accounting transaction cycles, system documentation, internal control, and information technology system reliability. (Spring only)
  
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    AC 409 - Individual Income Tax

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 202 , EC 102 , EC 103 , EC 220 .  A study of the federal tax law for preparation of individual income tax returns. A consideration of the ethical obligations of tax preparers is also included. (Spring only)
  
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    AC 412 - Taxation of Business Entities

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 202 , EC 102 , EC 103 , EC 220 .  The study of business entity taxation. The first theme involves the structure of federal income taxation and investment taxation. The second theme involves types of business entities, accrual tax accounting, and the determination of business entity net income. The third theme involves the business deductions, including tax depreciation and tax consequences of asset dispositions. The fourth theme involves the taxation of business entities, including accounting for income taxes and the taxation of flow-through entities. The fifth theme involves the taxation of cash distributions from corporations and flow-through entities. The sixth theme deals with special business topics, including multijurisdictional taxation and acquisitive corporate reorganizations. Additional topics include a comparative analysis of the various forms of doing business and an introduction to tax research. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    AC 421 - Auditing

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 302 . Focuses on the concepts of auditing in manual and computer-based accounting systems, as well as the generally accepted auditing standards and procedures. Students develop the judgment and decision-making skills needed to function as auditors. Topics include ethical responsibilities, internal control evaluation, evidence gathering, reporting standards, and basic auditing concepts. (Fall/Summer)
  
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    AC 459 - Research Topics in Accounting

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to senior accounting majors. Students develop individual research with a faculty member in a specific area of mutual interest. Students must begin with a written plan for the project and conclude with a written research report. Written or electronic permission of the department chair. (Fall/Spring)
  
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    AC 498 - Accounting Internship (100 Hours)

    (1.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 301 . Restricted to accounting majors. Provides students with preparation for careers in accounting through practical work experience. Through on-site work requirements, students learn to apply accounting knowledge to actual business experiences and work environments. Minimum expectation is 100 hours over six weeks, under the guidance of an onsite supervisor. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Does not count toward the 120-credit graduation requirement.
  
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    AC 499 - Accounting Internship (150 Hours)

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AC 301  or AC 311  Restricted to accounting majors. Provides students with preparation for careers in accounting through practical work experience, personal development, and career planning. Through the on-site work requirement, students learn to apply their accounting knowledge to actual business experiences and work environments. Minimum expectation is 150 hours of internship experience under the guidance of an on-site supervisor. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Only one internship may count toward the 120-credit degree requirement.

Arabic

  
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    AB 101 - Arabic I

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the four language skills: reading, understanding, speaking, and writing, as well as the structure of Modern Standard Arabic and the cultures of Arabic-speaking countries. For students with no previous knowledge of the language. Heritage speakers should discuss placement with the instructor. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    AB 102 - Arabic II

    (3.00 cr.)

    A continuation of AB 101 . Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    AB 103 - Arabic III

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AB 102  or equivalent. A continuation of AB 102 . Further development of speaking, understanding, and writing skills of Modern Standard Arabic, as well as the cultures of Arabic-speaking countries. Heritage speakers should discuss placement with the instructor. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    AB 104 - Arabic IV

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AB 103  or equivalent. A continuation of AB 103 . Heritage speakers should discuss placement with the instructor. Laboratory study outside the classroom is required.
  
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    AB 201 - Arabic Composition and Conversation

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: AB 104 . Increases students' oral and written proficiency through assimilation of advanced structural patterns, stylistic analysis, and discussion of contemporary topics.

Art History

  
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    AH 110 - Survey of Art: Paleolithic to Gothic

    (3.00 cr.)

    A broad overview of art from the Paleolithic age to the Gothic era, focusing on Egyptian, Greek and Roman, early Christian, and medieval art and architecture. Fulfills fine arts core requirement. Same course as CL 241 .
  
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    AH 111 - Survey of Art: Renaissance to Modern

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of major artistic styles from the beginning of the Renaissance to the modern era. Fulfills fine arts core requirement.
  
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    AH 202 - African Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the great variety of both the ancient and living arts of Africa focusing primarily on those traditions in sub-Saharan Africa. An overview of African art exploring its distinctive genesis, history, and evolution by emphasizing such traditional media as sculpture, architecture and fiber, and body arts. Looking at African art in its cultural context reveals its importance as an integral part of African society, as well as awakening an awareness of the great beauty, refinement, and aesthetic appeal of the arts of Africa. IAF/IG
  
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    AH 203 - The Arts of East Asia

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines East Asian civilization through the visual arts. Discusses selected masterpieces of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese painting, calligraphy, sculpture, bronzes, ceramics, and architecture. Through analytical study of these objects, students come to an understanding of the shapes and shaping of East Asian civilization and the characteristics that distinguish the separate traditions of China, Korea, and Japan. IA
  
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    AH 204 - Islamic Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of the rich and diverse artistic heritage from the seventh century to the present. A wide range of media is covered, including architecture, calligraphy, ceramics, textiles, and manuscript illumination. Religious and secular art is examined within its historical context in Spain, North Africa, the Middle East, and central and south Asia. IA
  
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    AH 207 - African American Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    This survey of African American art begins in the slave communities of eighteenth-century colonial America, continues with African American artists' adaptations of Western art in the nineteenth century, and ends with the political and aesthetic concerns of black artists in the twentieth century. Examples of architecture, decorative arts, folk art, painting, sculpture, graphic arts, and photography demonstrate how African American artists have enriched the art and culture of America. The social and political place of African Americans throughout America's history is also explored to provide a context for the struggle these artists experienced in pursuing their careers. IAF/IU
  
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    AH 300 - Survey of Architectural History

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of major architectural monuments from ancient Egypt to the present. Explores the relation between the appearance and function of buildings, the use of ornament in relation to materials, and the social and symbolic importance of architecture. Formerly AH 210.
  
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    AH 301 - Women in Art

    (3.00 cr.)

    In a 1971 essay, art historian Linda Nochlin asked, "Why have there been no great women artists?" When looking at art created by women from the Renaissance to the present, this question will provoke many ways of thinking about women and the making of art: is there such a thing as "women's imagery"? Are all women artists necessarily feminists? Why have women artists been left out of the art history of the past—or have they? Is it any easier today for women to become artists than it was 500—or 50—years ago? Formerly AH 200. IG

  
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    AH 306 - Ancient Egypt: Cultural Crossroads in Africa

    (3.00 cr.)

    Investigates the development of Egyptian visual arts in the ancient world, and the spread of Egyptian culture to such diverse cultures as the Mesopotamians of the ancient Near East and the Nubians and Kushites of the southern Sudan and eastern Horn of Africa. Visits to the Walters Art Museum and the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum will provide opportunities to study a broad range of Egyptian art from its coalescence in the Neolithic era (c. 4000 B.C.E.) to its final years as a province of Rome (30 B.C.E.). IAF
  
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    AH 307 - Discovering Difference: Art in the Age of Exploration

    (3.00 cr.)

    The two centuries following Columbus's "discovery" of the New World in 1492 were marked by an unprecedented degree of interchange between formerly unconnected cultures. In both Europe and the New World, this contact had wide ranging implications in terms of politics, economics, food ways, science, religion, and art. Using art and visual culture as points of entry, this course examines the history and implications of this interchange during the age of exploration.
  
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    AH 308 - Art of Ancient Greece

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of Greek art and architecture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Era. Among the topics considered are Mycenaean tombs and palaces, the development of temple architecture, and the ways in which polytheistic religion shaped life in ancient Greece. Same course as CL 308 .
  
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    AH 309 - Art of Ancient Rome

    (3.00 cr.)

    A survey of Roman art and architecture from the emergence of the Etruscan Civilization to the fall of the empire. Topics include the forging of a new Roman culture from Italic and Greek origins, the invention of new construction techniques, and the appropriation of art for propagandistic purposes. A section of this course is offered in Rome. Same course as CL 309 . II
  
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    AH 310 - Church and Empire: Early Medieval Art, c. 250-1050

    (3.00 cr.)

    An exploration of European art beginning with the earliest emergence of Christian art in the mid-third century through the flowering of magnificent church architecture in the twelfth century. Brilliant mosaics; sculpture in stone, ivory, and bronze; glittering reliquaries holding saints' bones; monasteries; and illuminated manuscripts are among the types of artworks examined. Students investigate how Christianity and the growing influence of Germanic ethnic groups transformed the artistic heritage of the Roman Empire during this period, and how pilgrimage, aesthetic theories of beauty, the fear of idolatry, assertions of sacred and secular power, and other contextual factors shaped artworks. This course meets in the Manuscript Room and Medieval Department at The Walters Art Museum several times during the semester. IC/IM
  
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    AH 312 - The Renaissance in Italy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Investigates art's reflection of the rise of humanism, the rebirth of interest in antiquity, and a new concentration on the earthly world in thirteenth- to sixteenth-century Italy. Studies art and patronage in Republican Florence, Papal Rome, and the ducal courts of Northern Italy, from the time of Giotto to the High Renaissance of Leonardo and Michelangelo, and on to Mannerism and the Counter-Reformation. IC/II/IM
  
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    AH 313 - Renaissance Art in Northern Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    A study of the developing humanism of the fifteenth century in Flanders where the manuscript tradition of painting developed into the naturalistic and symbolic painting of the late Gothic period, as well as the increasing influence of Italian art on Northern Europe in the sixteenth century. IC/IM
  
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    AH 314 - From Caravaggio to Rembrandt: Art of Baroque Europe

    (3.00 cr.)

    Originating in late sixteenth-century Italy, the Baroque soon spread, influencing the production of painting, sculpture, and architecture throughout Western Europe. The course examines the rise of the Baroque in the workshop of Caravaggio, traces the development of the style throughout Europe, and culminates with the works of Rembrandt and the Dutch School. IC/II
  
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    AH 315 - Art of the Revolutionary Era: Europe, 1780-1848

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the radical politics of art in France from 1780 to 1848 and the concurrent emergence of landscape painting and portraiture as art forms that reflected the values of the growing middle class in England, Germany, France, and Spain.
  
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    AH 316 - Realism and Impressionism

    (3.00 cr.)

    Throughout the second half of the nineteenth century, artists such as Courbet, Manet, and Monet struggled to free themselves from older art forms in an effort to become "modern," to capture the life and spirit of their own times. Investigates the artistic transformation that occurred in an era of rapid social change as artists struggled with new avenues for marketing their works (through dealers and galleries), mined new urban spaces and newly created suburbs, and combed the diminishing countryside for their images. IG
  
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    AH 317 - Modern Art in Europe: 1880-1945

    (3.00 cr.)

    At the end of the nineteenth century, artists prized self-expression over centuries-old conventions for art. Examines the dreamy world-weariness of Symbolist artists at the end of the nineteenth century; the assault on conventional art forms by artists such as Picasso, Matisse, and Duchamp in the early twentieth century; and the Surrealist effort to capture and objectify the subjective in art.
  
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    AH 318 - American Art: Art for a Democracy

    (3.00 cr.)

    Although American artists looked to European models for their inspiration, their art consistently reflected the complexities of American culture. In America, English aristocratic portraits were transformed into Puritan celebrations of hard-earned and therefore, well-deserved wealth; American architects responded to the practical demands of climate and materials at hand; painters of American life glorified the wilderness even as it was disappearing; the democratic process was both glorified and satirized. Examines the American response to European art as it was assimilated and transformed by American artists from the seventeenth century to the Great Depression. Same course as HS 356 . IU
  
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    AH 319 - History of Photography

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of the major technical and aesthetic movements in the history of photography since its invention. Covers the works of major artists working in this medium as well as the major styles. Students in this class will not be expected to produce photographs. Same course as PT 319 .
  
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    AH 320 - Contemporary Art, 1945 to the Present

    (3.00 cr.)

    In the aftermath of World War II and with the advent of the Abstract Expressionists, American artists seemingly pioneered the successive waves of postpainterly and hard-edged abstraction, Pop and performance art, conceptual art, and earthworks. Explores the diversity of European and American art from 1945 to the present.
  
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    AH 322 - Michelangelo

    (3.00 cr.)

    Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) was arguably the most important artistic figure of the sixteenth century. Active as a painter, sculptor, architect, draftsman, and poet, Michelangelo greatly influenced the development of art in Italy (and Europe) both during and after his life. Works such as David and the Sistine Chapel ceiling are examined in the context of the political, religious, artistic, and philosophical concerns of the time. Michelangelo's art also is examined in relation to that of his predecessors, contemporaries, and followers, so that students may come to understand not only his art but his impact on the art of the Renaissance and, more broadly, on Western European art. II
  
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    AH 325 - Gothic Art and Architecture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Beginning around Paris in the mid-twelfth century, this course investigates the emergence and development of Gothic-a style of art and architecture that dominated Western Europe for centuries and offered new ways of envisioning the world and the divine. Gothic is studied in its social contexts across a range of media, from towering churches to manuscripts in local collections. IC/IM
  
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    AH 326 - The Crusades in Medieval Visual Culture

    (3.00 cr.)

    Explores the crusades as a catalyst for artistic encounter between western European, Byzantine, and Islamicate cultures in the Holy Land and the Mediterranean from the eleventh through the fourteenth centuries. The investigation of the richly varied art and architecture of this period-which includes intricately carved ivory boxes, scintillating mosaics, and imposing castles-provides critical insights into the complex historical processes of cultural conflict and convergence. IC/IM
  
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    AH 351 - American Urban Culture: A Tale of Four Cities

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students explore the growth of cultural institutions in four American cities-Baltimore, Boston, New York, and Philadelphia-in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. For much of the time under consideration, the elite and the citizenry in each of these cities competed to establish exemplary cultural institutions that would be emulated-or envied-by other cities. Early urban planning, religious edifices, monuments, parks, museums and libraries, and department stores are among the topics considered. Same course as HS 351 . IU
  
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    AH 352 - Transatlantic Exchanges: Modernist Art in Europe and America

    (3.00 cr.)

    What is/was modernism in art? This course explores the emergence of modern art in Europe and America from the 1860s to the 1960s-chronological parameters that coincide with the emergence of a self-conscious, antitraditionalist aesthetic on the part of some artists (notably Edouard Manet in France in the 1860s) and the post-World War II globalization of Western art that produced an international modernism with its commercial roots in New York City (in the works of abstract expressionist and pop artists such as Jackson Pollock and Andy Warhol). Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    AH 400 - Methodology and Historiography

    (3.00 cr.)

    Through readings, discussions, museum and gallery visits, students examine the diverse methodologies of art history and the history of the discipline from its emergence in America in the 1930s to the present. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Strongly recommended for art history majors and minors.
  
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    AH 402 - Special Topics in Art History

    (3.00 cr.)

    An intensive investigation of a special topic, artist, limited span of time, or a particular artistic "problem" in the history of art. Combines a lecture and seminar format. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    AH 403 - Internship: Art History

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students interested in an internship in the history of art or museum studies should contact the instructor. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. May be repeated for nondegree credit.
  
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    AH 404 - Summer Internship: Art History

    (1.00 cr.)

    Taken by art history majors and minors participating in off-campus internships in museums, galleries, auction houses, or other art-related venues. Written or electronic permission of the instructor. Does not count toward the 120-credit degree requirement. (Summer only)
  
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    AH 405 - Prints and Printmaking: A History of Printmaking in the West

    (3.00 cr.)

    Examines the history of European and American prints from the early fifteenth century up to the present day. Prints are viewed in their historical, artistic, material, and cultural contexts, and numerous meetings are held in the print room of the Baltimore Museum of Art. The course uses critical theory and features practical demonstrations of printmaking techniques. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    AH 406 - Museum Studies: History, Politics, and Practices

    (3.00 cr.)

    Offers a critical introduction to museums, one of the most influential types of cultural institutions. Far more than repositories of objects, museums today are vital crucibles of discussion and debate about public values, memory, and identity. Participants survey the historical development of museums from the Renaissance to the present and consider challenges that currently confront museums. Written or electronic permission of the instructor.
  
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    AH 412 - Senior Project in Art History

    (3.00 cr.)

    Restricted to seniors. Students develop an advanced research project under the direction of a faculty member. Work on the project continues throughout both semesters of the student's senior year. Written or electronic permission of the department. Proposals for senior projects must be approved by the fine arts faculty during the spring semester of the student's junior year.
  
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    AH 490 - Capstone Project in American Studies

    (3.00 cr.)

    As the capstone experience for the American Studies minor, each student develops an independent research project, internship, or service-based project, to be advised by two professors from different departments and presented at an end-of-year American Studies Symposium. The project constitutes the culmination of the student's work in American Studies and provides an opportunity for the student to bring together the perspectives of two different disciplines on a research area of particular interest. A project proposal must be submitted to and approved by the American Studies committee prior to registration for either the fall or spring semesters of senior year. The project must contain both a research and a formal writing component (the equivalent of a 20-25 page research paper). Written permission of the instructor. IU

Biology

  
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    BL 100 - Insects in Our World

    (3.00 cr.)

    Touches on the practical aspects of the effects of insects on man, animals, agriculture, and the environment. Topics include a brief overview of general entomology, medical entomology, forensics, methods of insect control, beneficial insects, pesticide use, IPM, and transgenic technologies. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. Closed to students who have taken BL 250  and BL 351 .
  
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    BL 101 - Introduction to Forensic Science with Lab

    (4.00 cr.)

    Restricted to students minoring in forensic studies or written permission of the department chair. An introduction to the field of forensic science and its application in the world today. Topics include crime scene investigation, DNA analysis, questioned documents, forensic psychology, and toxicology. Lab topics include fingerprint and shoe print analysis, crime scene investigation, blood typing, and use of DNA in criminal investigation. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. Closed to students who have taken BL 110 . IFS
  
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    BL 102 - Medicinal Plants

    (3.00 cr.)

    The use of herbal remedies is common in our society and is increasing. This course explores the basic biology of common medicinal plants, the historical uses of medicinal plants with an emphasis on ethnobotany, and the current regulatory status of herbal remedies. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors.
  
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    BL 103 - Microbes and Man: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    (3.00 cr.)

    Microorganisms shape the world that we live in in countless ways. This course provides a framework for understanding microorganisms like viruses, bacteria, and protozoans while focusing on their influence on day-to-day life. Topics range from the beneficial uses of microorganisms to diseases caused by them, as well as our efforts to control them. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. Closed to students who have taken BL 332 .
  
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    BL 104 - Twisted Planet: Global Issues in Biology

    (3.00 cr.)

    An examination of biological issues of significance in our global society, which is increasingly marked by an understanding of environmental consequences; worldwide markets and technology; competition for resources; civil/ethnic wars; changing traditional boundaries to disease; and the increasing disparity between developed and developing countries and regions. Major topics include biological considerations of race, population dynamics, the consequences of war, forest and biodiversity loss, global climate change, global water distribution, and the threats of emerging diseases. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. A field trip to the National Aquarium in Baltimore is required. GT/IES
  
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    BL 105 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology

    (4.00 cr.)

    A lecture/laboratory course designed for psychology majors that introduces basic anatomy and physiology of the human body, from a single cell to the coordinated whole. Topics include the function of each organ system, development, and interactions with the central nervous system. The laboratory component emphasizes physiological experiments. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. Closed to students who have taken BL 206  or BL 208 .
  
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    BL 106 - Science of Life

    (4.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: PH 110  or written permission of the teacher education department chair. Restricted to elementary education majors. A lecture and laboratory course that investigates life's activities from the molecular to the ecosystem level. Explores aspects of human biology, ecology, molecular biology, and diversity. Written assignments and laboratory activities supplement text and lecture material. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors.
  
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    BL 107 - Life on the Edge

    (3.00 cr.)

    Biology is the study of life. Perhaps the most fascinating examples of adaptations for life occur in extreme environments such as salt marshes, deep ocean vents, hot springs, and arctic tundra. Students examine a wide diversity of organisms "living on the edge" in extreme environments to investigate the pivotal relationship between structure and function. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors.
  
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    BL 109 - Modern Marvels of Biotechnology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Biotechnology is an exploding, ever-changing field. This course explores current techniques in biotechnology, the impact of this technology on human life, and the ethics of this new science. Topics may include recombinant DNA; medical forensic science; genetic engineering; and medical research for the advancement of understanding of human disease and conditions. Some lab work may be required. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors.
  
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    BL 110 - Introduction to Forensic Science

    (3.00 cr.)

    An introduction to the field of forensic science and its application in the world today. Topics include crime scene investigation, DNA analysis, questioned documents, forensic psychology, and toxicology. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. Closed to students who have taken BL 101 .
  
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    BL 111 - Environmental Biology

    (3.00 cr.)

    An integrated study of environmental problems, connections and solutions. Environmental issues are explored by combining information from the natural sciences with ideas from the social sciences. Topics include ecosystem functioning, sustaining biodiversity, climate change, conservation efforts, environmental risk, waste issues, food production, and energy resources. A variety of learning techniques are used including debates, student presentations, field trips, service activities, timely readings, group discussions, and weekly laboratory work. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. IES
  
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    BL 113 - Human Biology

    (3.00 cr.)

    A general introduction to biology focusing on humans. Topics include cell biology, genetics, molecular biology, form and function of organ systems, and the interaction between humans and their environment. Intended for nonscience majors. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. Closed to students who have taken BL 105  or BL 121 .
  
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    BL 114 - Biology: A Human Approach

    (3.00 cr.)

    Designed for the nonbiology major to explore selected topics of the biology of humans. Topics include testing ideas about the transmission of communicable diseases; how human activities change the animal vectors of communicable diseases; and that human efforts to obtain food change the rest of nature. Students explore analysis with multiple working hypotheses. The course ends with an exploration of birth. Four to five laboratory sessions. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors.
  
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    BL 115 - Biology, Evolution, and Human Nature

    (3.00 cr.)

    Designed for the nonbiology major to explore how the process of evolution created such complexity of life. Topics include Darwinian theory, the genetic basis of selection and adaptation, evolutionary social theory, the biology of behavior, and human evolution. Lecture only. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors.
  
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    BL 116 - The Chesapeake Bay Environment

    (3.00 cr.)

    A comprehensive study of the Chesapeake Bay that introduces students to the wealth of resources and the fragility of the United States' largest estuarine system, which happens to be here in our own backyard. The course examines physical, chemical, and biological processes affecting coastal and estuarine ecosystems, focusing primarily on the Chesapeake Bay. Historical and present day human influences and impacts, as well as important management techniques in the Chesapeake Bay Region are examined. Topics include estuary types; diversity of animal, plant, and microbial communities in the Bay; energy and material flows (including such things as erosion); policy and economic decisions; and ecosystem management in the Chesapeake Bay region. A variety of learning techniques are used including readings, group discussion, laboratory activities, case studies, student presentations, and field trips. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. IES
  
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    BL 117 - Beans and Bugs: Food Production Implications

    (3.00 cr.)

    Students investigate the science and issues involved in food production. Topics include agricultural practices and policy; environmental effects of producing food; nutritional illnesses and the obesity epidemic; use of technology to increase food supplies; pest management practices; and sustainable agricultural systems. The issues are explored using case studies, debates, and lab experiments. Some lab work is required. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. Closed to students who have taken BL 120 .
  
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    BL 118 - Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: BL 119 . An examination of the cellular basis of life, specifically how cell structure determines cell function, thereby enabling cells to adapt to their environment. Topics include metabolism, energy conservation, central dogma, gene regulation, cell reproduction, and the cell in its social context. Required for biology majors. Fulfills the natural science core requirement.
  
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    BL 119 - Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology Lab

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: BL 118 . Laboratory work supports and enhances material from the lecture. In addition, students are introduced to techniques used in the laboratory, as well as in the field of cellular and molecular biology. These techniques include microscopy, enzyme kinetic studies, DNA isolation, and gel electrophoresis.
  
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    BL 120 - Food: Environmental and Human Impacts

    (3.00 cr.)

    The development of agriculture was one of the great innovations in human history, allowing our species to expand to the current population size of over six billion. However, this change in diet has had broad implications for human health and the health of the Earth. This course investigates the science and issues involved in food production. Topics include the ecology and physiology of nutrition; evolutionary changes in the human diet; food and the environment; the impact of diet on human health; and social justice issues related to food production and accessibility. This course serves as a core course in the natural sciences or as a free elective for biology majors. Closed to students who have taken BL 117 . One weekend field trip to the Chesapeake Bay is planned. IES
  
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    BL 121 - Organismal Biology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 . Corequisite: BL 126 . Students are provided a brief introduction into the diversity of organisms, followed by a more in-depth examination of the relationship between the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organ systems in plants and animals. A comparative approach is used to examine how organisms solve various issues pertaining to life. These problems include nutrition, exchange of gasses, reproduction and development, transport of materials, and control via hormonal and neural communication. Students are introduced to the process of scientific thinking, as well as the principles of organismal biology. Required for biology majors. Fulfills the natural science core requirement.
  
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    BL 126 - Organismal Biology Lab

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: BL 121 . Laboratory work supports and enhances material from the lecture. The course focuses on observational skills and covers topics that include diversity of organisms, introductory comparative anatomy, and vertebrate anatomy. Technical skill development includes microscopy and invertebrate and vertebrate dissections.
  
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    BL 201 - Ecology, Evolution, and Biodiversity

    (3.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: BL 202 . Restricted to majors, interdisciplinary majors, and biology, environmental and sustainability, or natural sciences minors, or students with written permission of the department chair. An examination of the processes which produce the diversity of organisms on our planet. Topics include the biotic and abiotic factors which determine the distribution and abundance of species and evolutionary processes which lead to adaptation, speciation, and extinction. Also examines conservation of the diversity of life by studying the interaction between humans and other organisms. Addresses quantitative aspects of biology, modeling, and graphical representations of empirical and theoretical concepts. Required for biology majors. Fulfills the natural science core requirement for nonscience majors. IES
  
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    BL 202 - Process of Science and Ecology, Evolution, and Biodiversity Lab

    (2.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: BL 201 . Students explore the biodiversity of life on earth through field trips, lab experiences, and computer simulations. Basic biostatistics is introduced and used throughout this course. Student-designed investigative projects allow students working in small groups to practice skills in experimental design, data collection, computer-aided analyses, and communication skills.
  
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    BL 206 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126  or equivalent. Corequisite: BL 207 . The first in a sequence of courses in human anatomy and physiology designed to meet the requirements for students pursuing careers in nursing or allied health. The course covers basic body organization; functional biochemistry; cytology; histology; study of integumentary, skeletal, muscular, circulatory, and respiratory systems; and emphasis on the study of normal anatomy and physiology with clinical applications. Written or electronic permission of the department chair or director of curriculum and advising. Closed to students who have taken BL 260  or BL 452 .
  
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    BL 207 - Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab I

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: BL 206 . A laboratory course designed to provide exercises and other activities that supplement and reinforce topics covered in BL 206 .
  
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    BL 208 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 206 , BL 207 . Corequisite: BL 209 . A continuation of BL 206 . A comprehensive study of the digestive, excretory, endocrine, reproductive, and nervous systems. Written or electronic permission of the department chair or director of curriculum and advising. Closed to students who have taken BL 260  or BL 452 .
  
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    BL 209 - Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab II

    (1.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: BL 208 . A laboratory course designed to provide exercises and other activities that supplement and reinforce topics covered in BL 208 .
  
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    BL 210 - Introduction to Human Nutrition

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126  or equivalent. An introduction to nutrition principles including the digestive system; the six nutrients and their roles in the body; food sources with an emphasis on the anatomy, physiology, and biochemical processes; nutrient recommendations; nutritional needs during the life cycle; nutritional factors in food selection and preparation of foods with an emphasis on the nutritional and chemical properties of foods; nutrition in health and disease: weight control, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dental health, cancer and nutrition; conducting a diet history; development of healthful recipes and menus; and evaluation of nutrition information for the public. Exercises include evaluation of the diet and recipes using computerized analysis; evaluation of body composition; and sampling of foods with healthful properties such as vegetarian items, low fat foods, and foods with particular phytochemicals.
  
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    BL 220 - Natural History of Maryland Species

    (4.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 121 , BL 126 , BL 201 , BL 202 ; or written permission of the department chair for nonmajors. Studies the natural history of Maryland's native plants and animals. Their ranges, habitats, adaptations, conservation status, and interactions with other species are studied using ecological and evolutionary principles. Through lectures, laboratory exercises and field trips, Maryland's many habitats-from the Chesapeake Bay to the Appalachian Plateau-are explored. IES
  
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    BL 222 - Aquatic Biology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 121 , BL 126 , BL 201 , BL 202 . Corequisite: BL 223  . A study of physical, chemical, and biological interrelationships in aquatic environments including freshwater, estuarine, and marine systems.
  
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    BL 223 - Aquatic Biology Lab

    (2.00 cr.)

    Corequisite: BL 222 . Field trips reinforcing the concepts of BL 222 . Trips may include visits to local streams, reservoirs, and Chesapeake Bay sites. Trips may be supplemented by laboratory analysis of collections. Weekend field trips may also be required.
  
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    BL 230 - Avian Biology with Lab

    (5.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 121 , BL 126 , BL 201 , BL 202 . An introduction to the study of birds, their evolutionary origins, diversity, special adaptations, life histories, social behavior, and ecology. The laboratory includes bird watching, identification, dissections, and behavior. Two or three weekend day trips are included.
  
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    BL 241 - Invertebrate Zoology with Lab

    (5.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126 . Recommended Prerequisite: BL 201 , BL 202 . An introduction to the exciting and amazing world of animals without backbones. The course focuses on the life histories, behavior, structure, physiology, and ecology of common invertebrate groups. Consideration is given to adaptations for interacting with plants and animals. Emphasis is also placed on those creatures that have a significant impact on the human condition, including those invertebrates of medical and agricultural importance. Students explore live and preserved specimens in lab to gain a greater understanding of structure-function relationships.
  
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    BL 250 - General Entomology with Lab

    (5.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 121 , BL 126 . Recommended Prerequisite: BL 201 . An introduction to the insect world emphasizing insect life histories, structure, behavior, physiology, and ecology. Consideration is given to adaptations for interacting with plants, animals, and man. Laboratories are designed to introduce all aspects of insect biology and implement methods for studying insect pollination, carrion ecology, morphology, apiculture, and cell culture. Field trips to various habitats emphasize insect diversity and collection techniques.
  
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    BL 255 - Introduction to Biomedical Research

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126 . Restricted to sophomores or juniors. A laboratory course aimed at developing essential skills utilized in various areas of biomedical science research such as developmental biology, cancer biology, neurobiology, physiology, stem cell biology, biotechnology, and regenerative
    medicine. The course introduces students to laboratory techniques, process of experimental design, laboratory record keeping, scientific ethics, troubleshooting experimental challenges, and scientific research communication. Closed to students who have taken BL481 or BL482.
  
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    BL 260 - Vertebrate Morphology with Lab

    (5.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126 . An integrated approach to the development, microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of vertebrates. The course examines the evidence of how major vertebrate organ systems have evolved from basal deuterostome ancestors. It also examines how transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitat paralleled transformations of the respiratory, skeletal, and circulatory systems. The laboratory component explores the early embryology of frog and chick and the gross anatomy of the cat. Closed to students who have taken BL 206  or BL 208 .
  
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    BL 270 - Ecology with Lab

    (5.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 201 , BL 202 . An introduction to the principles of ecology stressing interaction between organisms and their environment at the levels of the individual, population, community, and the ecosystem. These principles are then applied to current environmental and conservation problems and issues. Laboratory experiments, computer simulations, and field experiences designed to demonstrate basic ecological principles. One weekend field trip may be required.
  
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    BL 276 - Human Health and the Environment

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 111  or  BL 201  or CH 114 ; and SC 276  (may be taken concurrently); or written permission of the environmental and sustainability studies minor director. What does Lyme disease have to do with climate change? Why did children lose millions of IQ points to leaded gasoline and paint? Why do so many children in Baltimore have asthma? Answers may be found in this exploration of the bidirectional relationship between our health and the health of our homes, communities, food, air, waterways and climate. Study of toxicology, risk assessment, prevention, environmental justice, history, and policy will provide framework for understanding effects of environmental exposures. Examples of how major exposures such as air toxins are managed in Baltimore and Maryland lend context and relevance to class discussions. Finally, examples of environmental impacts on children, the most vulnerable population group will emphasize a major course theme: a multidisciplinary approach is necessary to guarantee the health of future generations and the planet. Same course as SC 276 . IES
  
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    BL 280 - General Genetics with Lab

    (5.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126 . Recommended Prerequisite: Recommended BL 201 . An introductory course in genetics with lab exercises using plants, drosophila, and humans to reinforce the principles of classical, molecular, and population genetics.
  
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    BL 281 - General Genetics

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126 . Recommended Prerequisite: BL 201 . An introduction to genetics focused on principles of classical, molecular, and population genetics.
  
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    BL 305 - Plant Ecology with Lab

    (5.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 121 , BL 126 , BL 201 , BL 202 . General principles of ecology are used to study the relationship of plants to physical and biological factors. Through a synthetic approach using lecture, lab, and discussion, students learn about the pivotal role of plants in the ecosystem. Topics include urban ecology, plant community ecology, restoration ecology, and global climate change. Field and laboratory experiments emphasize ecological research techniques and allow students to gain experience in designing studies, making field observations, and learning standard methods of data collection and analyses. A weekend field trip may be required. IES
  
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    BL 310 - Botany with Lab

    (5.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126 . The cell biology, anatomy, physiology, diversity, and economic importance of plants with emphasis on practical applications in pharmacology, horticulture, and the environment. Laboratory activities acquaint students with practical applications of botany while maintaining a strong emphasis on the basic facts and principles necessary for a sound foundation in the plant sciences. IES
  
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    BL 316 - Comparative Physiology with Lab

    (5.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126 . A comprehensive introduction to the similarities and differences in the functional processes of animals at selected levels in phylogeny. Emphasis is placed on the adaptive significance of life processes that have evolved as a consequence of an ever-changing environment. Laboratory experiences include comparative examination of the structure and function of select vertebrate and invertebrate organ systems. Techniques rely on modern and classic research methods used to study physiological processes, including protein electrophoresis, cell structure, electrocardiography, and electroencephalography.
  
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    BL 317 - Comparative Physiology

    (3.00 cr.)

    Prerequisite: BL 118 , BL 119 , BL 121 , BL 126 . A comprehensive introduction to the similarities and differences in the functional processes of animals at selected levels in phylogeny. Emphasis is placed on the adaptive significance of life processes that have evolved as a consequence of an ever-changing environment.
 

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